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THE 



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ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS >y / 



OK THE 








[ mn 



OF THE 



Iptesbietedan Cbuvcb in Canaba 



HALIFAX, JUNE 13-20, 1900. 




TORONTO : 

MURRAY PRINTING COMPANY, GLOBE BUILDING. 
1900. 






\ 'I 



OFFICERS i)V THE GENF:1{AL ASSEMBLY, 1900. 



Thic Ukv. ALLAN I'OLI^OK, D.I)., Mixhnilor. 

Thk Rkv. ROBERT CAMPIUOLL. D.l)., ^ 

- Joint ('lrrk->* 
Tin; Rkv. ROBERT H. WARDEN, D.D., J 



BOARDS AND CO MM ITT ICES . 



HCniBCTH. 



Hronliytcriiiii CuHi-ku. HnKfux llonril 

■' ■' '■ Si'tiiilf 

I"r«Hliyioriiiii Collo^r, MohIilmiI Hoard 

" " .SlMllltl! 

• ^ui'i'ii s rnivcrsity iviul ('Dllrgc BiirHiiry CoiiiiiiiUee. . 
Knox ('ollcCM l!o;iiil 

" Seniiti' 

Mitiiitoliii Collrno lloaril 

Home MinHioiia Wcstirii .Section 



CONVBKBRA. 



P()HT OFFICE. 



RKV. T. .Si;j)OWICK, 7> D ' TntanmgoiuhcN.H 

I'ltist IIAI. I'OI.I.OK. I) D Halifax 

DAVID MOKUK'K. V.s^| Montr, al 

ritrxi [|-AI. Mac VK'AU. U.D.l.L.I) Monlr.al 

J. M( l.NTVHK. Ksv. I/.C KinKHU>" 

W. M(»l!TI.Mi:i! t;i,AKK, Enc,., <^,C Toronto 

1'KIN< ll'Al. CAVKN, D.D., I,I,.D Toronto 

COLIN 11. CAMI'IJKI.I-. Ks.^, (/.(; Winnipej,' 

KKV. K. H. WAKDKX, DD Toronto 



KKV. T. HTKWAKT. 11.1). . 



Dartmouth 
Hamilton 
Middle Stewiaeke, 
Ottawa IN.S. 



" KaHlerii Silt ion 

AiiBmentatloii Wiv^iein .Siilion I KKV. H. l.Vl.K. D.D 

Kastcrn.S.rtion ' KKV. K. SMITH, H.A 

Foreign MisMJnns We.-iern .Seet ion ( KKV. WIM.IAM MOOllK, D.D 

Kastein Seelion I UKV. AI-K.XANDKK I'Al.CONKU, D.D.ilMelou, N.S 

FremhKvaii),'eli/.alion l'KIN< irvM. MxcVlCAK, D.D., I, K D. .. .Montreal 

DiHlriliution of I'roliationern UKV. KOltKKT TOKUANCE, D.D Guelpli 

CHuirrh Life ami Work ' KKV. D. I). Mcl.KoD Harrie 

.SaliKtCth Schools : KKV. .lOllX NKH, Toronto 

Widows' and Orphans' Kinid Western Seetion '\ JOSKI'll HKNDKKSOX, K.si; Toronto 

Maritime I'rovinees See. j UKV. lioliHUT LAlNti, U.A Halifax 

Chinch of Scotland See..' UKV. KOllKUT CAMriiKI.U D.D .Montreal 

Ajted and Intirni MinistcT.s Fund Western Section....! J. K. MacDONAI-D. Ksc^i Toronlo 



Kaslcrn Secaion. . . .' KKV. A.NDKKSON IKKiKKS, Il.A.. 



New <Jla!>({ow, N.S. 



Finance 



Wcslern Section i ttKOK<iE K KIT 11, KSt/ Toronto 

Kasi.ern Section .1. t'. .M Al'KINTO.SH, K.si; Halifax 

glati.siies UKV. KOl'.KKT TOKKAXCE. D.D (Inelph 



ProtBct ion of Clmrih Property Hon. 

(."hitich and .Manse ISiiilding Fund i ,1. 1!. 

Hymnal Com in it tee ' UKV. 

Preshyleriaii Kecord KKV, 

Younn l'cHi|>lesSocic>ties KKV 

Sahl'ai h School I'uhlieations UKV 

Saliliath Oiiservaiico ' UKV 

Ce-ilury Fund i UKV 

Hoard of Triisteua ' UKV 



•UsTii K .MaiI.KXX/\X Toronto 

.MiTiAUKX, Ksc; Winnipeg 

WIM.IAM t;UK(!(i,D.D Toronto 

UODKUT H. WAKDKX, D.D Toionlo 

AKKKKD IJANDIKK, H.D Halifax 

KOUEKT U, WAKDKX, D.D. .. Toronto 

D. K. DRUMMOXD. It, I) St. Thomas 

ROHEKT 11. WAUDKN, D.I) Toronto 

. UOHKKT II. WAKDKX, D.D . . Toronto 



Genf.h.vi. Adkxt of the Church Western Section, 

-Kasteni Seclion, 

KnrroK "I'resbyierian Uccord," 

Gknkkal AGKXTof ihcCeiiHiry Fund, 



Ukv. K. H. WAUDKN, D.D., Toronto. 

Ukv. K. a. MtOUUDY. Hnjifiix. 

Ukv. K. HCOTT, M.A., Montrefil. 

Ukv. UOBT. CAMPBELL. Sell., Perili, Ont. 



A 



c4l 



MATTERS TO WHICH THE ATTENTION OF THE 
VAinOUS PKESr.VTElUES 18 DIRECTED BY 
THE GENERAE ASSEMIJLY. 



1. Tlic fiillDwinK Remit is ii<,'iiiii sent down to ProsbyterioH, in terms of the IJarrier 
Act, with iiiatructions tr) them to report their views thereon to J{ov. Dr. Warden, 
Toronto, not hiter than Febniiiry 28th, 1901. (See page ;{2) : 

Whercd.i experience hua shown that much of the time of the General .Assembly is 
taken up i;i deaiini; with luatters of detail, which could fully and more conveniently be 
dealt with at the meetinj^s of our several Synods ; 

And whereas, according to the procedure hitherto followed; cases are permitted to 
come l»y way of appeal to the <!eneral Assembly which might well bo issued in one of 
the inferior judicatories, and with which the (ieneral Assembly cannot satisfactorily deal 
without unduly extending the sittings of that Court, and also involving the parties con- 
cerned in much needless expense. 

Therefore, the Venerable, the (General Assembly, is hereby humbly overt ured by 
the Synod of Toronto and Kingston : — 

That the power of the Synods of the Church shall be extended by conferring upon 
them the right »,; exercising final jurisdiction in all matters of petition, reference, com- 
plamt or appeal coming from I'resbyteries within their own bounds, which do not 
involve matters f administration or of doctrine affecting the Church as a whole, or 
matters of disci))lme atl'ecting the ecclesiastical status of any member or ottice-bearer (sf 
the Church. 

2. Rf Aids to Social Worship. — That the Committee be continued and instructed 
to ascertain the mind of the Church more fully in regard to the use of such a Manual, 
for the purp(j8e8 contemplated. (See page 50.) 

'A. Presbyteries arc asked to arrange meetings for conferring with Dr. Campbell. 
Agent of the Century Fund. (See {lage .'».'<.) 

4. Presbyteries are asked to make returns to the (Jlorks of Assembly <>f all Remits 
sent down to them befori3 April 1st next. (See p^ge 09.) 

5. The (pieation of the desirability of having a Sabbath School and Field Secretary 
for each Synod is referred to the several Presbyteries and Synods. (See page 02.) 



I 



^ 



111 



THE 



ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS 



OK THK 



TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



OK THK 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



FIRST SEDERUNT. 

At the Oity of Halifax, and unfhin St. Matthew'a Church there, the thirteenth day of 
June, One thonaand nine hundred, at htdf-pant seven o'clock in the evenimj : 

Which time and place ministers and ruling elders, commissioners fron. ..le several 
Presbyteries of the Presbyterian Church in Canada, convened, pursuant to appointment 
by the General Assembly held in the City of Hamilton, on the twenty-second day of 
June last year. 

The Rev. Robert Campbell, Sc.D., of Perth, General Agent of the Century Fund, 
Moderator of the last General Assembly, conducted public worship, and preached a 
sermon from the words in Psalm forty-six, tifth verse : " God is in the midst of her, she 
shall not be moved," and then by prayer constituted the General Assembly in the name 
of the Lord Jesus Christ, che only King and Head of the Church. 



, ROLL CALL. 

The aames of the Commissioners having been presented in a printed list, the 
Assembly on motion duly seconded, in accordance with the recommendation of the 
Business Committee, agreed co accept the same as the roll of Assembly, subject to any 
corrections, subsequently to be made when it came to be scrutinized. The Roll is as 
follows : — 

[1015] 



A rTS AM) IMt()("Ki:i»IN(j.s (»K nn.; IWIATV-slXTII (SKNKIIAL ASSEMIU.Y 



(Till' names jf //lo.ic juisihI iu» iiiiirl.>'il nitli nn i/.s/ccm/.). 



1.— SYNOD OF TlIK MARITIMK rHOVLNX'KS. 



T'llKSIJVTKKV OK Tl{ri{(t. 



yiinisfefn. 

*.Thiiiuh McLuhu. 
*I). S. FniNor. 
*.I. n. McLoim. 
*A. B. McLeod. 

K. S. ColHu. 
*J()hn Mumy. 



*>]. H. Tumor. 

*( Miorge (). F(irl)08. 

*('. 15. Spenocr. 

•Iiilin Kirke. 
*<it!iiri4« lUirris, 
*(ie()r'j;e Ciuiipbt-ll. 



*r)avid DruniiiKuul. 
*NViIlmin (Jriiiit. 
*Mfilc«)lm McLeod. 
♦T. C. .lack. 
*.f. F. For 1)68. 



PKKSTiVTKIlV OF SVDXKV. 



*Normiiii McDonald. 
*F. Falconer, 
■^deorge McI'lierHon. 

Alexander IJoyd. 

Win. Campbell. 



*!). McLeod, M.A. 

*A. McMillan. 

*L. H. McLean, M.A. 

*Neil Currie. 



I'JIFSIJYTKKV OF INVKItXKSS. 



Ale.xander Oainjyi)ell. 
*Neil Nicholson. 
*Colin Nicholson. 
*1). McAskill. 



PREST5YTKIIY OF HALIFAX. 



*.T. F. Dustan. 

*.). RosborouL'h, M.A. 

*Profe8sor R. Falconer, H.l). 

*A. (Jandier, B.D. 

*H. Dickie, B.D. 

*.). S. Black. D.D. 

♦Principal PoUok, D.D. 

*Thunia8 Fowler, M.A. 

♦President Forrest, D.D. 

*.>L G. Henry. 

*.I. P. Falconer, B.A. 



*T. A. Malcolm. 
*\\. H. (:ha.se. 
*A. G. Troop. 
*.l. K. Munnis. 
♦Sherifl" Archibald. 
*I.saac i;'rei<!hton, 
*Dr. Cr.'elman. 

Anj^us McLeod. 
*ThoniiiiS Forbes. 
*R. Baxter. 

Georjje Bowles. 



*T. Sedgwick, D.D. 
*C. Munro, B.A. 
*D. Wright. 
W. S. Darragh. 



PRFSRYTERY OF WALLACE. 



*,IamP8 B. Wilson. 
♦.Archibald McKenzie. 

.John McKeen. 
♦.Tames W. .\dams. 



[1016] 



OF THK IMIKSHVTKUIAN CIIUIM ll I\ r.\\Al)A. 



I'UKSIJVTKIIY OF IM('T(H 



*\\'. V. Arcl.ilmld. H.I). 
*.J. (Jiirruthers. 
♦.J. K. Munro. KU. 
*J. A. CHirns, M.A. 
*(;. S. Ctirm.ii, H.A. 
♦.MexHiidor Fiilconor, D.l). 
♦T. Cuininini;. 
*VV. M. TuHtB, n. I). 



Kid'' IS. 

*.1. I). FrHHor. 
*A. C. ThoiiiHon. 
*S. \V. M>icd..n«ld. 
♦Ddiiiid Monoiifkld. 
*.l. D. CniickuhHiikH, 
*AIoXiiiiil«r Miickiiittmh. 
*.I. A. MHclemi. 
*.l()hn FrHHiT. 



PHESBVTEUV OF PRINCE EDWAKD ISLAND. 



*W. n. Spoiicer. 
^Roderick McLuiin. 
Adiiin (iuiui, U. A. 
*.I. Laytoii. 
*<iei>rj^e Milliir. 
*D. H. McLeod. 
* Alexander Ster! .u 
♦John GilliH. 



*J. (i. McCrtlluiii. 

(iu(>ri;o H. Ailkon. 
*(Jei>rj,'o Hull. 

D. C Murwtn. 
*.lHiiit's liiiiiiHny. 
*\V. H. Hn.wn. 
♦William Mutch. 
♦T. C. .laniBH. 



PRESHYTERY OF LrNENRrilG AND YARMOUTH. 



*G. A. Leek. 
.J. H. Stewart, R.A. 



*E. L. Nash. 
*.]. Levi Oxner. 



PRESRYTERY OF ST. .TOHN. 



*D. J. Praser, B.D. 

*A. D. Eraser, B.A. 

♦R. G. Vans. 

♦Wm. Peacock. 

♦A. A. McKenzie, D.Sc. 

Willard McDonald. 
*\V. R(.s.s, B.A. 
♦.Tames Ro.ss. 
*A. S. Morton, B.D. 
♦T. F. Fotheringham, M.A. 
♦J. A. Morison, Ph.D. 



♦H. A. White. 
♦I). McLean. 

L. W. Johnstone. 
♦Dr. VV. S. Morrison. 
♦W. C. Whittakur. 
*Dr. Walker. 
♦.John Willet. 
♦.I. A. CJray. 

A. Henderson. 
♦A. M. McKenzio 



♦T. G. Johnstone. 
♦W. Aitken. 
♦J. D. Murray. 

.John Robertson. 

A. F. Cam M.A. 



PRESBYTERY OF MIRAMICHI. 

.Tohn Menzies. 
♦W. R. McMillan. 
William Anderson. 
George Haddow. 
R. N. Weeks. 



ii 



♦John Morton, D.D. 



PRESBYTERY OF TRINIDAD. 



I ♦Robert Murray. 

[1017] 






« ACTS AND I'ltOCEEDINQH OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH OENEUAL ASSEMBLY 



2.— SYNOD OF MONTREAL AND OTTAWA. 



PRESBYTERY OF gUEBEC. 



Minister n. 
»Donald T»it, B.A. 
*D(mRld McRao, D.D. 
.iHrnes M. VVhiteltiw, B.D. 
*Neil Mac Kay. 
*K. Maclennan, M.A. 



Eldf.ia. 
Robert Stewart. 
* William Sutherland, 
•lames W. Kadie. 
J. T. Tebbutt. 
William Thumpnon, M.D. 



PRESBVTKRY OF MONTREAL. 



J. L. George, M.A. 
^Calvin E. Amaron, D.D. 
*E. Scott, M.A. 
♦Andrew Rowat. 

Ci. Colborne Heine, B.A. 

S. J. Taylor, M.A. 

Jules Bourgoin. 

J. C. Thomson, M.D. 
♦Principal MacVicar, D.D.,LL.D. 
*John Scrimger, D.D. 

Thomas A. Mitchell. 
*A. J. Mowatt. 
*J. E. Duclos, B.A. 
*A. B. MacKay, D.D. 

D. McDonald, Ph.D. 
*R. Campbell, D.D. 



David Morrice. 
♦Walter Paul. 
''^Janieb Rodger. 

R. Munro. 

(». E. Roberton. 

William Drysdale. 

A. McCormick. 

J. H. Scott. 

Dr. Berwick. 

S. R. Clendinning. 

George Loy. 

Malcolm Thomson. 

.7. H. Cay ford. 
♦D. McCormick. 
*D. Torrance Fraser. 
♦James Ross. 



PRESBYTERY OF GLENGARRY. 



^Archibald Graham, B. 
♦James L. Miller, B.A 
♦George Weir, B.A. 
♦James Cormack, B.A. 
♦John McLeod, B.A. 
Neil MacNish, LL.D. 



A. 



♦R. McCrimmon. 

♦A. C. McArthur. 

A. N. Cheney, 



PRESBYTERY OF OTTAWA. 



♦William Moore, D.D, 

J. A. Moir, LL.B, 
♦W. T. Herridge, D.D. 
♦Robert Gamble, B.A. 
♦William Patterson, B.A, 

D. M. Ramsay, B.D. 
♦A. Logan, B.D. 

Isaac Campbell, Ph.D. 
♦T. A. Sadler. B.A. 

J. W. H. Milne, B.A. 



Dr. J. Th«)rburn. 

F. A. Coffin. 

J. B. Halkett. 

George Hay. 
*,]. R. Reid. 

E. B. Holt. 
♦William Hamilton. 

James Gibson. 

John Hardie, 

R, H. Cowley. 



[1018] 



or THE PH&SBYTEUIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



9 



PRK8BYTKRY OF LANARK AND RENFREW. 



Minii'tfrii. 

* Robert Cftmplwll, Mc.D. 

A. A. Soott, M.A. 
♦A. H. Scott, M.A. 
♦Hugh Taylor. 
*Alex«ndflr H. Maofftrlane. 

Thot. Nixon. 

<}eurge D. Bayne, Ph.D. 

Charles M. Cuoke, B.A. 

John Flay, B.D. 



F. T. Froet, M.P. 

Andrew Johnston. 

Nornmn Riddell. 
*Janies A. Allan. 

JaineH Turner. 
^Alexander (i. Farrell. 

Samuel WiUon. 



PRKSBYTERY OF BROCKVILLE. 



*John Maofarland, B.A. 
♦John McC. Kellook. M.A. 
John J. Cameron, M.A. 
♦Andrew C. Bryan, B.A. 
♦Daniel Strachan, B.A. 



♦William B. Smelliu. 

John M. Gill. 

Jamea Moodie. 
♦James P. Fox. 
♦Jamea Cochrane. 



3.— SYNOD OF TORONTO AND KINGSTON. 



PRESBYTERY OF KINGSTON. 



Robt. Laird. 
♦W. T. WilkinB, B.A. 

M. MacGillivray, M.A. 

Joseph Gandier. 
♦W. W. Peck, LL.B. 
•Principal Gran., D.D., LL.D. 
♦David Fleming, B.A. 
♦Prof. MacNaughton, M.A. 

James Cumberland, M.A. 
♦W. S. McTavish, B.A. 



D. O. Sinclair. 

Lieut.-Col. Duff. 

W. O. Craig. 
♦D. McLean. 
♦Professor Dyde. 

(ireorge Gillies. 
♦Wellington Boulter. 

J. W. Maxwell. 

John Terrill. 

Samuel Russell. 






PRESBYTERY OF PETERBOROUGH. 



m 



W. M. Kannawin. 

Peter Duncan. 
♦C. S. Lord, B.A. 
♦R. F. Hunter, M.A. 
♦J. W. Mcintosh, M. A. 

J. G. Potter, B.A. 



♦James H. Johnston. 

J. F. Clark. 
♦W. E. Roxburgh. 

James Russell. 
♦A. Fairbairn. 

William Moncrief. 



[1019] 






10 ACTS AND PIIOCEEDIXGS OF THE TVEXTV-SIXTH GEVERAL ASSEMBLY 



Ministers. 

*Il. M. Phnlen, B.A. 

Alexander McAuley, B.A 
*.l (lines Hodges, B.A. 



PRESBVTERV OF WHITBY. 

Elders. 

a. J. Hooy. 
*Thoma8 Mcjrris. 
T. C. Foriiiau. 



J. McD. Duncan. 
K J. Macdonald. 
D. M. Martin. 
A. U. Caniul)ell. 
R. C. H. Sinclair. 



PRESBYTERY OF LINDSAY. 



John Campbell. 
a. F. Bruce. 
.John Madiil. 
P. R. McEachern. 
Henry Ulendinning. 



PRESBYTERY OF TORONTO. 



*.Tanies Carmichael, D.D. 
*l*rincipal Caven, D.D., LL.D. 
*R. i'. MacKay, D.D. 
* William McLaren, D.D. 
^Robert H. Warden, D.D. 
*R. D. Fraaer, M.A. 

Thomas McLachlan, B.A. 

Alexander McMillan. 
*.John Neil, B.A. 

S. Carruthers. 

W. McKinley. 

Prof. .1. Ballanfyne, B.A. 

J. A. Brown, B.A. 

W. M. McKay. 

Alex. MacCiillivray. 



*W. Wilkie. 

*,Jame8 Bain, jr. 

*\\'. Mortimer Clark, Q.C. 

♦Robert Davidson. 

S. C. Duncan-Clark. 
*Goorge Keith. 

.John Lowden. 
*David McClure. 

Ebenezer Bauld. 

.J. Iv. Macdonald. 

Hamilton Casaels. 

.John Gowans. 

W. B. McMurrich. 

Robert Brown. 

.John Winchester. 



• 


PRESBYTERY OF O RANGE VILLE. 


*J. W. Orr. 




Thomas Akitt. 


*J. R. Bell. 




Thomas Knox. 


if *L. W. Tliom. 




A. .M. Gibson. 


i J. McMillan. 




R(;bert Taylor. 


' *.]. A. McConnell. 




*David Menary. 




I'RESBYTERY OF BARRIE. 


1 ,J. A. Ross, B.A. 




*W. Campbell. 


' *N. Campbell, M.A. 




^-George Grant. M.A 


(Jeor^e Craw. 


^ 


E. (iarrett. 


James Skene. 




D. Cameron. 


P. Nichol. 




Thomas Slott. 


' J. E. Smith. 




W. Wrijrht. 


*D. D. McLeod. 




.John Rogerson. 


i *A. Findlay, D.D. 




W. M. Lawrence. 


' D. L. McOrae, Ph.D. 




J. J. Brown. 



*W. G. Smith. 
John Bucket. 
S. Childerhose, B.A. 



PRESBYTERY OF NORTH BAY. 



E. Mclvenzie. 
George Morrison. 
S. (}. Best. 



[1020] 



OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA, 



11 



Ministers. 

*Janie8 Anderson. 
E. D. Pelletier. 
VV. J. MacBean. 



PRESBYTERY OF ALGOMA. 

Elders. 

Q. W. Angus. 

■') William Matheson. 

F. R. Bennett. 



*J. Hunter. 
*J. Somerville, D.D. 
*A. Thomson, B.D. 
*E. W. Waits, Sc.D. 
*.). S. Davidson, B.A. 



PRESBYTERY OF OWEN SOUND. 



*John Armstrong. 
*.Jame.s Gardner. 
*Dr. A. E. Henry. 
*Alex. Pringle. 
*Wm. Rohson, 



Jas. J. Peterson, B.A. 

D. L. Campbell, B.A. 
*John Gray Reid. 
*N. A. McDonald, B.A. 



PRESBYTERY OF SAUGEEN. 



R. Fotheringhain. 
A. T. Dodds. 
Alex. Murdock. 
Peter Kean. 



PRESBYTERY OF GUELPH. 



*R. J. M. Glasbford. 
■"•Robert Torrance, D.D. 

R. E. Knowles. 
*J. B. Mullan. 
*J. A. Cranston. 
*A. M. Hamilton, M.A. 
* William Robertson, B.A. 



*Richard Hanna. 
*(ieorge Sutherland. 
*Jame8 Chambers. 

David M. Allan. 
*John Rutherford. 

John Orr. 
♦William Weir. 






4— SYNOD OF HAMILTON AND LONDON. 



PRESBYTERY OF HAMILTON. 



D. C. Mclntyre, Ph.D. 
R. H. Abraham. Sc.D. 
S. W. Fisher. 

M. Eraser, D.D. 

E. B. Chestnut. 
W. A. Cook. 

J. Young. 
*S. Lyle. D.D. 
J. D. Edgar. 
J. Muir. 
A. McWilliams. 



F. Reid. 
*R. A. Thompson. 
*.I. B. Hamilton. 

Dr. .1. McKinnon. 
*A. I. MacKenzie. 

J. Charlton, M.P. 

R. McQueen. 

W. R. Leckie. 
*George Rutherford. 
♦Alexander McPherson. 

R. Lawrie. 



[1021] 



12 ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



•4 
I'iii. 



Minuiters. 

M. McGregor, M.A. 
*R. Pettigrew, M.A, 
*E. R. Hutt. 

J. M. Millar, B.A. 

.1. Skinner Scott, B.D. 

Alex. Stewart. 



PRESBYTERY OF PARIS. 



Elders, 

George Bryce. 

Jas. McKnight. 

Dr. Ddwar. 

S. M. Thomson. 
*David Brown, 
■^.lohn Sutherland. 



PRESBYTERY OF LONDON. 



1 



*J. (i. Stuart. 
*W. A. VVyllie. 
*W. M. Kay. 
*R. W. Leitch. 
♦William Gauld. 
♦James Steven. 
*.I. H. Barnett. 
♦James Little. 
♦S. Lawrence. 



♦D. C. McKellar. 
♦D. Mc Alpine. 
♦Edward Waugh. 
♦C. ii . Fitzgerald. 
♦James I. Sutherland. 

Andrew Allan. 
♦D. Campbell. 

John McPhail. 
♦William Watson. 



PRESBYTERY OF CHATHAM. 



N. D. Keith, B.A. 

A. McGregor, B.A. 
♦G. Munro, M.A. 

J. R. Battisby, Ph.D. 

F. H. Larkin, B.A. 
♦John Mclnnis. 



Robert Currie. 
Dr. Stewart. 
Thomas Trotter. 
Alexander Bartlet. 
♦James Law. 
John S. Laird. 



PRESBYTERY OF SARNIA. 



*John Thompson, D.D. 

♦W. D. Bell, B.A. 

*T. A. Bell, B.A. 

♦A. A. Graham, B.A., B.D. 

*W. G. Richardson, B.A. 



♦P. A. McDiarmid. 
♦E. M. Copeland, M.D. 

D. Prittie. 

R. M. Brown. 
*George Scott. 



PRESBYTERY OF STRATFORD. 



♦Robert Hamilton, D.D. 
♦W. M. Haig, B.A. 
♦J. S. Hardie. 
♦M. L. Leitch. 
J. H. Graham, B.A. 
♦Peter Scott. 



John Leslie. 
*Duncan Stewart. 
♦William Haddow. 
*George McCalium. 
♦John Campbell. 
*Robert Hovey. 



PRESBYTERY OF HURON. 



♦Neil S.iaw, B.A. 
♦Archibald McLeai , 
*Samuel Acheson. 
♦J. A. Anderson, B.A. 
♦James Hamilton, B.A. 



[1022] 



♦J. P. Ross. 
*John Eraser. 
*R. P. Bell. 
♦William Moir. 
♦Gordon Young. 



OP THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



13 



Minwters. 

George Ballantyne. 

Robert Fairbairn, B.A. 
♦Roderick McLeod, B.D. 

R. S. G. Anderson, B.D. 
*W. J. West, M.A. 



PRESBYTERY OF MAITL/ ND. 

Ekhrs. 

*H. D. Henderson. 
♦Sherborne Waddell. 

William Dawson. 

Hon. Judge Forbes. 



PRESBYTERY OF BRUCE. 



*.Ia". R. Craigie, M.A. 
♦D. A. McLean. 
^James Fitzpatrick. 
♦H. McQuarrie. 



William Rowand. 
T. Robertson. 
James Craig. 
Peter Cameron. 



5— SYNOD OF MANITOBA AND NORTH-WEST 
TERRITORIES. 



*S. C. Murray. 
W. A. Rae. 



PRESBYTERY OF SUPERIOR. 
I ♦John Grierson. 



PRESBYTERY OF WINNIPEG. 



♦C. B. Pitblado. 
♦A. G. Bell. B.A. 
*J. H. Cameron. 

C. W. Gordon, B.A. 
♦Joseph Hogg. 

Professor Hart, B.D. 



♦J. B. Mitchell. 
♦Geo. Cunningham. 

Hon. D. MacKeen. 

Jas. D. McGregor. 

John O. Hogg. 

Peter Cavanagh. 
♦S. G. Mathison. 



PRESBYTERY OF ROCK LAKE. 



*' James Farquharscn. 
J. A. Bowman. 
Alexander Hamilton. 
Thomas Beveridge. 
F. J. Hartley. 



J. Bowman. 

R. Menteith. 

Lieut. -Col. D. McCrae. 

David Duncan. 

A. McQuarrin. 



PRESBYTERY OF GLENBORO. 



J. A. ReddoiJ, B.A. 
R. Thynne, M.A. 



♦W. R. Ross. 
♦W. G. McLaren. 



[1023] 



■ 1 



U\ 



14 ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



PRESBYTERY OF PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE. 

Mhiisters. Elders. 

Peter Wright, D.D. 



•James Douglas. 
Fanjuhar McRae, M.A. 
*.\ndrew Chisholra. 



*D. W. McCuaig. 

E. H. Sharp. 

John (irant. 
* William Ross. 



PRESBYTERY OF BRANDON. 



P. Strange, B.A. 
E. Mason. 
E. A. Henry, B.A. 
T. A. Shearer, B.A. 
R. A. Finlaysnn, B.A. 



T. Jeffrey. 
J. J. Grant. 
J. McKinnon. 
E. Ives. 



PRESBYTERY OF MINNEDOSA. 



H. N. McLean. 
*C. McDiarmid. 
William J. Herbison, B.A. 
H. T. Murray. 



J. McMillan. 

R. H. Meyers. 
*Prof. W. C. Murray. 
*Dr. A. H. MacKay. 



PRESBYTERY OF MELITA. 



*G. P. Tattrie. 
Peter Fisher. 



H. J. Archibald. 
James Perrin. 



J. A. Carmichael. 

C. A. Bryden. 
A. Lee, B.A. 
T. McAfee. 

D. Oliver. 

*S. W. Thomson. 



PRESBYTERY OF REGINA. 



W. D. McLaren. 
J. A. Hill. 
R. Martin. 
*J. C. Mcintosh. 
Simon Bannerman. 



6.— SYNOD OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Gavin Hamilton. 
J. A. J affray, B.A. 



*M. White. 
*G. Vetter. 
*J. Robertson, D.D. 



PRESBYTERY OF CALGARY. 



*Wm. T. Kennedy. 
*Geor<re Mitchell, M.P.P. 



PRESBYTERY OF EDMONTON. 



R. McQueen. 
*J. D. McGregor. 



[1024] 



OF THE FRESBYTEBIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



15 



Ministers. 
*\y. W. Hardie, M.A. 



PRESBYTERY OF KAMLOOPS. 
1 



Robert Frew. 
I). Mc(J. (irtiulier, B..>.. 
J'isoph McCoy, M.A. 
Duncan C nipbell, H.A. 



PRESBYTERY OF KOOTENAY. 



George M. Kinyhorn. 
A. S. Mcdregor. 
C. R. Somorville. 



.John A. Loyan. 
.J. C. Forster. 
*.John Prinale. 



PRESBYTERY OF WESTMINSTER. 



*\V. H. Fniaer. 
*David Blackwood. 
*J. A. Macdonald. 



Wi Leslie Clay. 
*A. B. Winchester. 
E. G. Taylor. 



PRESBYTERY OF VICTORIA. 



Thornton Fell. 
Hon. William Roas. 



7.— PRESBYTERY OF INDORE. 



*F. H. Russell, M.A. 
J. Frazer Smith, M.D. 
N. H. Russell, B.A. 



C. R. Woods, M.D. 



*W. Harvey Grant. 



8.— PRESBYTERY OF HONAN. 

I *.Iudge Steveiid. 



Dr. Campbell addressed the Assembly, thanking.' the brsthren for all the support 
which he had received in the discharge of his duties in the Chair, reviewing the efforts 
and the successes of the year, recalling the events by v/hich the hearts of the peoplejof 
the Briti.sh Empire have been drawn together, and referring to the deaths in the ranks 
of the ministry, especially mentioning Dr. Morrison, Dr. MacDonald, Dr. T. G. Smith, 
Mr. Alexander Young and Dr. Thomas Duncan, and iiitimated that the time had come 
for the election of a Moderator of this Assembly, an' asked for nominations for the 
ottice. 

[1025 






I: : 



16 ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

Mr. Kenneth MacLennan moved that the Rev. Allan PoUok, D.D., Principal of 
the Presbyterian College, Halifax, be elected Moderator. The motion was seconded by 
Dr. Lyle. The motion was unanimously carried, and Principal PoUok, having been 
introduced and welcomed, took the chair and deli'v ered a suitable address. 

KEPORT OF THK MOUKRATOK FOR 1899. 

Dr. Campbell reported that the Loyal Addresses had been forwarded as directed by 
the last General Assembly, and the replies received were laid upon the table. 

THANKS TO DR. CAMPBKLL. 

It was moved by President Forrest, seconded by Mr. Walter Paul, that the thanks 
of the Oeneral Assembly be tendered to Dr. Campbell, the Moderator of last year, for 
the courteous and efficient manner in which he had filled the chair, and for the able and 
interesting sermon which he preached at the opening of the Assembly. The motion was 
carried and the Moderator accordingly conveyed the Assembly's thanks to Dr. Campbell, 
which he briefly acknowledged. 

AGENT FOR THK EASTERN SECTION. 

Dr. Campbell also reported the action he had taken after the death of Dr. Morrison, 
Agent of the Church for the Eastern Section, in authorizing Dr. McMillan to act as 
temporary Agent, in response to a request from the Conveners of the several committees 
of the Eastern Section ; and in subsequently endorsing the action taken by the Synod 
of the Maritime Provinces in nominating Mr. McCurdy to that office. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON BUSINESS). 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on Business, which was given 
in and rjad by Dr. Warden, Clerk of the Committee, and is as follows : — 

Th<) Business Committee met this afternoon and adopted the following recom- 
mendations : — 

(1) That the Roll of Assembly which has been printed be held as read. 

(2) That, with a view to have the attendance accurately recorded, each member be 
requested to write upon the card which has been provided for the purpose, his name, 
address, and the Presbytery which he represents, and to hand those in at the clerk's 
office, receiving in return therefor a copy of the stitched reports to be submitted to this 
Assembly. 

(3) That the Sederunts of the Assembly be from ten in the morning to half-past 
twelve, and from half-past two to a quarter to six in the afternoon, and from a quarter 
to eight to ten in the evening, and that the first hour to-morrow morning be spent in 
devotional exercises. 

(4) That the Committee on Bills and Overtures be composed as follows : — The 
Clerks of Assembly, the Clerks of Synods and Presbyteries who are members of Assem- 
bly, together with the following : — Dr. J. S. Black, Messrs. George Miller, W. C. 
Whittaker, Daniel McDonald, James Cormack, Dr. IVIoore, A. H. Scott, James 
Rodger, John Neil, Dr. D. L. McCrae, J. S. Davidson, Professor Dyde, William J. 
West, J. S. Scott, Neil Sha George Rutherford, Joseph Hogg, James Farquhar- 
son, George Mitchell, M.P.P.; Hon. D. MacKeen, A. B. Winchester, G. Vetter, 

[1026] 

/ 



OP THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



17 



J. A. Macdonald, Judge Stevens and W. H. Qrant ; and that the Committee on Bills 
and Overtures hold its first meeting to-morrow morning at nine o'clock. 

(5) That the following be a Committee on the Roll of Assembly : — Messrs. W. T. 
Wilkins, Convener, T. C. Jack and George Keith. 

Dr. Warden moved that the Report be received and its recommendations adopted. 
The motion was seconded and agreed to. 



i^VNOU K0LL8. 



'ii 



Dr. Warden submitted the Rolls of Synods, along with the changes that have taken 
place, and moved that they be received and held as read, and be printed in the appendix 
to the Minutes. The motion was seconded and agreed to. 

The Assembly adjourned to meet in this place to-morrow morning at ten o'clock, 
whereof public intimation having been made, this Sederunt was closed with the 
benediction by the Moderator. 



SECOND SEDERUNT. 



At the City of Halifax, and within St. Mattheio'a Church there, Thursday, the fourteenth 
day of June, One thousand nine hundred, at ten o'clock in the forenoon : 

The General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Canada met, pursuant to 
adjournment, and, as agreed upon last night, the first hour was occupied in devotional 
exercises, conducted by the Moderator, who constituted the Court, Principal Mac Vicar, 
Mr. Grierson, Mr. Cumming, Dr. Thompson and Mr. MacKay. 

The minutes of the First Sederunt were read and approved. 



COMMITTEE ON BILLS ANI> OVERTURES. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on Bills and Overtures, 
which was given in and read by Mr. J. Farquharson, Clerk to the Committee, who 
moved its reception and adoption. The motion was seconded and agreed to. The 
following is the docket so far as arranged for : 

This Evening — Home Mission Reports, East and West. 

Friday Evening — Foreign Missions. 

Monday Evening — Church Life and Work ; Sabbath Schools ; Youn» People's 
Societies, and Sabbath Observance. 

Tuesday Evening — French Evangelization and Augmentation. 

Thursday Morning — 

1. Minutes of Commission of Assembly. 

2. Applications to receive ministers, with recommendation that they be referred to a 
Committee. 

3. Application regarding students and that they be referred to a Committee. 

4. Returns to remits, with recommendation that they be referred to a Committee. 

5. A communication from the Synod of Maritime Provinces re the signing of 
permanent records. 

6. The appointment of Committees to examine the records of the Assembly, 
Synods, and Presbyteries having Synodical powers. 

[1027] 



18 ACTS AND PHOCKKDINOS OK TIIK TWKNTV-SIXTII GKNEUAL ASSEMIU.V 

» ' KEPOIIT or COMMISH'MN OK A8HKMIII.Y. 

The Asaeiuhly culled for the niituitHs of the CrJiiimiNsion of Unt AHHemhIy, instructed 
to deal with the miitter of (ippointiii!,' li Priiici{)iil and Professor for Manitolm Colleye, 
which wore submitted l>y Dr. Wiirdeii. 

The minutes were, on motion of \)r. Warden, duly succmded and ordered to ho 
printed alonu with the minutes of the Assumhly. 



Ii:i: s 



APHUCATIONS ON HKIIAI.K OK MIMSTKKH AHKINO TO BK KKCBIVKO. 

Applicati(mH of Proshytorien for leave to receive ministers of other ChurcheH into 
the ministry of this Churcli were siihmilted and dealt with as follows : — 

1. Presbytery of Quebec, on behalf of Kov. Placide Huudreau. 

2. Presbytery of North IJay, on behalf of Rev. K. W. Watson. 
'A. Presbytery of Hamilton, on behalf of llev. (J. Hooth, 1),D. 

4. Presbytery of Winnipejj;, on behalf of Rev. .J. C. Madill. 

5. Presbytery of Minnedosa, on behalf of Rev. Itobert (jow. 
(5. Presbytery of Westminster, on behalf of Rev. W. A. (Iray. 

7. Presbytery of Victoria, on beli.ilf of lU-v. I). A. .M uilae. H.A. 
Those a{»plicationH were, on motion, duly seconded, referred to a Committee on the 
Reception of Ministers, to bo named by the Moderator. 

APPLICATIONS OK PRKSnYTKKIK.S OS UBHALK OK STIUKNTS. 

Applications on behalf of students, etc., were made by Presbyteries as follows : — 

1. Presbytery of Sydney, on behalf of Mr. Melville Grant, M. A. 

2. Presbytery of Tnverness, on behalf of Mr. R. P. Murray. 
.'{. Presbytery of W^allace, on behalf of Mr. J. H. Hattie. 

4. Presbytery of Algoma, on behalf .)f Mr. James Steele. 

5. Presbytery of Sarnia, on behalf of Mr. Robert Harbour. 
(>. Presbytery of Superior, on behalf of Mr. James Russell. 

7. Presbytery of Superior, on behalf of Mr. .J. L. King. 

8. Presbytery of Regina, on behalf of Mr. Campbell H. Munro. 

9. Presbytery of Calgary, on behalf of Mr. W. Simons. 

These applications were, on motion, duly seconded, referred to a Committee to be 
named by the Moderator. 

PEN LSKl) AT SIONINO THK TNION MINUTES IN 1875. 

Dr. J. S. Black presented to the Assembly the pen used at the signing of the 
Articles of Union in eighteen hundred and seventy-five by the Moderators and Clerks 
of the uniting Churches, which was accepted by the Assembly and left in the custody of 
the Clei-lc to be kept in the Presbyterian office at Toronto. Dr. Black was thanked for 
the interesting memorial. 

COMMITTEE ON KKMITS. 

The returns from Presbyteries on the Remits, sent down by last Assembly, were 
referred to a Committee to be named by the Moderator. 



SIGNING OF PERMANENT R!:CORI)S OF SYNOD OF MARITIME PROVINCES. 

There was presented and read a request to the Assembly from the Synod of the 
Maritime Provinces, asking thafe the printed record of that Synod for the meeting of 

[1028] 



OF THK IMIESHYTEKIAN' CHrHf M IN CANAKA. 



19 



October, one thousHiul uii'ht huiidrud »nd ninety-eij^ht, be Httestcd as the puriimitent 
record of the 8yiu)d. 

On motion, duly seconded, thu request wan comi>lied with, and the naid record was 
ordered to be attehtod accordingly. 



KXAMINATION OK KKCOKIiS. 

The Moderator was reijueHted to name Conimittoos to examine the Records of the 

General Assembly, of the several Synods, and of those I'resbytories that are clothed with 

Synodical powers. 

I 

STATISTICS. 

The .VsHembly called for the Report of the Committee on ytatiatics, which was 
given in by Dr. Torrance, Cunvi-net; who dre)v attention to its salient points and con- 
cluded with moving, seconded by Dr. Somerville, the reception and adoption of the 
Report. The motion was carried. 

Principal Caven then moved, seconded by Dr. Somerville :— 'I'hat the hearty thanks 
of the (Jeneral Assembly be ijjiven to the Rev. Dr. Torrance for the very excellent 
Report which he has now presented. The niotion was agreed to. 

Tt was moved by Dr. Warden and duly seconded :— That the following bo a Com- 
niitteu to consider what, if any, changes may be desirable in re Statistics, conseciuenb 
uptm the action of last Assembly : — Dr. R. P. MacKay, Cimvener, .Toseph Hogg, Presi- 
dent Forrest and Walter Paul. 

The Assembly adjourned to meet at this place at half-past two o'clock in the after- 
noon, of which public intimation was given, and this Sederunt was closed with the 
benediction by the Moderator. ' 



THIRD SEDERUNT. 



On ihe same d(i>j <i)ul <it the same place, at half-past tiru u'dock in t 'e a/ternaon : — 

The General Assembly met, pursuant to adjournment, an. was constituted with 

devotional exercises, Principal Given leading in prayer at the request of the Mocferator. 
The minutes of last Sederunt were read and confirmed. 



yUEEN S UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE. 

The Assembly called fctr the Report of Queen's University and College, which was 
given in by Principnl Grant, and which, being printed and in the hands of members, 
he called attention to in his remarks. Ho specially asked that the Assembly should 
give careful consideration to the matter of the proposed changes in the constitution. of 
the Governing Body of the University, and moved, seconded by Principal Mac Vicar i — 

That the report be received ; that the General Assembly express satisfaction at the 
continued prosperity of the University, and instruct the Presbytery of Kingston to 
receive Rev. Samuel McComb, M.A., when duly certified that he has been installed as 
Professor of Church History and History of Doctrine in the Theological Depai<tment ; 



[1029] 



;t 



20 ACl'H AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTV-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMHL. 

and defer further contiderntion of the report until » Committee, appointed by the 
Moderator, has connidered the important constitutional ohangei Huggeated. 

The motion waN carried. 

The Moderator named the following in terms of the resolution : — 

OOMMITTKK ON gUKEN's rNIVKIlHITY. 

Dr. John Thompson, (Jonfener ; Drs. Forrest, Sedgwick, Warden, Torrance, €»r- 
michael, Lyle, Herridge, Campbell (Perth) ; Principals (irant, Caven, MaoVicur, 
Messrs. Alfred Gandier, McNaughton, .1. G. Htuart, Strachan, Peck, Cormack, Hodges, 
Professor Falconer, Ministers ; with A. G. Farrell, ProfesHor W. Murray, Robert 
Murray, George Keith, (jeorge Rutherford, George Hay, >Senator McKeen, W. E. 
Roxburgh, JameH Baird, Robert DHvidaoii, J. A. Macdonald, •). A. Allan, William 
Hamilton, Jamen Rodger, Professor Dyde, EldetH. 

The Moderator's nomination whs approved of. 



I I 



'ilii 



KKI'OKT OK THK I'RKNIIYTEKIAN COLLK<IK, HALIFAX. 

The Assembly next called for the Report of the PreHbyterian College, Halifax, 
which was given in by Dr. Sedgwick, Chairman of the Roard of .Management, and 
which, being printed and in the hands of members, he called attention to in his remarks 
thereanent. 

Mr. A. J. Mowatt moved, seconded by Mr. .1. Neil : — 

That the (General Assembly adopts the Reports of the Board and Senate of the 
Presbyterian College, Halifax, with the recommendations of the Board, and is gratified 
at the continued prosperity of the College. The Assembly rejoices to learn that the 
new building has contributed so much to the etticiency of the work done during the last 
session, and hopes that the comparatively small amount still to be paid on the original 
cost will soon be received. In view of the growing needs of East and West, the 
Assembly would direct the attention of the members of the Church to the necessity of 
securing an even larger supply of students for the ministry of the Gospel. The 
Assembly would heartily commend the College to the continued and increasing 
sympathy and support of the members of the Church. 

The motion was agreed to. 

MOKRIN (JOLLKGK. 

The Assembly called for the report of Morrin College. The Clerk read a letter 
which he had received from the Secretary of the Board of Governors, intimating that 
no printed report was issued by the Board this year. 

Mr. D. Tait gave some verbal explanations as to the state of the College. 



KEl'OKT OF 81'KUIAL COMMITTEE ON MORRIN COLLEGE. 

At this stage, the Assembly called for the report of the Special Committee 
appointed by last Assembly to confer with the Governors of Morrin College, which was 
given in by Dr. Herridge, Convener, and which is as follows : — 

The Committee appointed by the General Assembly to confer with the Governors 
of 'Morrin College, begs to report that a conference was held, with the Governors in 
November last, at which the Committee suggested that, in view of the fact that the 
College could not be maintained on its present basis, part of the endowment fund be 

[1030] 



OF THK PURSMYTEIUAN CHUUrn IN CANAHA. 



SI 



used to further the iiitereats <>f higher eduj>iti(>ti in th« uity of (^iiulivc, mul part for the 
eiulowinent of h chuir in Thoolo^y in one of the oxiHtinn CollegeH of the ('hureh. 

On ni«>tion of Dr. Sedgwick, necouded hy Dr. VVnrden, the report was reccivod liiid 
adopted, and tne Oouiinittee wan reap{Miinted with instructionH to watch over the 
intereHta of the Church as they are involved in Morrin College, and report to next 
AHHeinbly. • 

(iOVKKNOIlH or M«)RIUN OOM.K.uK. 

On motion of Dr. Robert Ciinipbell, Aj^ent of the Century Fund, duly aeconded, 
MesHrH. .1. Fl. MacLeod and Kphraim Scott were appointed (lovernors of Morrin 
College for the current year. 

I'llKSBVTKIUAN <JOLI,E«<K, MONTUKAI-. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Presbyterian College, Montreal, which 
waH presented, in the absence of the Chairman of the Board of Management, by 
Principal MacVicar and which, being printed and in the handH of members, he called 
attention to in his remarks. He concluded by offering the following motion : — 

That the Assembly receive and adopt the Reports of the Board of Management and 
Senate of the I'resbyterian College, Montreal, and express its satisfaction with the 
success of the institution during the past year, gratefully acknowledging the liberality 
of those who have added to its endowments, and commend it to the consideration of 
the Church for continued .support, both by increasing its endowments and by annual 
contributions. 

The motion was seconded by Mr. .1. R. Munro, and adopted. 

KNOX COLLROl!;. 

The Assembly called for the report of Knox College, which was given in by 
Principal Caven, and which, being printed and in the hands of members, he called 
attention to in his remarks regarding the College and its work. He concluded with 
moving, seconded by Dr. R. Hamilton, as follows : — 

The Assembly receives and adopts the report, expresses satisfaction in the fact that 
the attendance of students remains good, approves of the action of the Senate in 
relation to the termination of the Preparatory Course, and authorizes the Board of 
Management, in conjunction with the Senate of the College, to appoint a Professor of 
Apologetics before the commencement of next session, if the Board shall be satisfied 
that the financial position of the College shall make such action safe and expedient. 

The motion was adopted. 



% 



MANITOBA COLLKOK. 

The Assembly called for the report of Manitoba College, which was presented by 
Mr. C. B. Pitblado, and which, being printed and in the hands of members, he called 
attention to in his remarks thereanent. He concluded with moving, seconded by Dr. 
Robertson : — 

That the report be received and adopted ; that the Assembly is truly thankful for 
the report of the progressive and efficient work that has >)een accomplished by Manitoba 
College during the past year, and for the appointment of Dr. Patrick to the Principal- 
ship of the Institution, and also for the success of the summer session up to this time, 



[1C31] 



f . \ L 



22 ACTS AM) IMUUJKKDINIJS OK TMK TWKNTY-SIXTH (JKNKIIAI. ASSKMIILY 

Hiut f)«HrfiIy coiniMflntiB th«> CoIIvkb to the nympntliieii, prHyern Hiid fiiiHiiciHl Nupport 
of the peuplu of our ('hiirch. 
The iitutiuii WHN carried. 

PINANOK IIKI'OHT, KAHTRBM HKCtlON. 

The ANiieiiil)ly cnllod for the FiiiHiico llvport, K)inturii Section, wliich whb preHeiited 
Wy Mr. .1. C. MitcKintoHh, (.'hiiirnuii, who CHllod Httuiitioii to its luiuliii({ fuiitureN. 
On motion, duly Miconded, tho report wiis received und tidupted. 

KINANCK KKI'OHT, WKHTKHN HKCTION. 

The AHseuihly ctillod for the Report of the KiiiHUce Committee, NVoitorn Section, 
which, in the H))Hence of the ChHirnmn, wiis pruHunted hy Dr. Warden, who eniphHni/.ed 
the fact that notwithHtandin^ the Mpecial uppualH made to the Church on l)ehalf of the 
Century and Famine Kundn, the ordiiniry funds iiad not in any way fallen off, and 
also called attention to the low relative cost of administering the funds of the Church, 
Hucb cost hein^ Icns than three and a-half per cent, lie moved, aeounded by Principal 
Caven, the rece])tion and adoption of the repoit. 

The motion whh carried. 



V ' :■' 



KKI'OHT ON THK KOLL. 

The AHsembly called for the Report of the Committee appointed to examine the 
Roll of Assembly, which was }^iven in and read by Mr. VV. T. Wilkins, Convener, who 
moved itH reception and the coiiMideration of its recommendations. The motion was 
seconded and agreed to. 

The recommendations of the report were, after amendment, adopted. The report 
is aa follows : — 

Returns have been received from tifty-five Presbyteries, jjiving the names of .'{05 
ministers and 295 elders, appointed as Commissioners. 

The name of Mr. Robert Murray is returned by the I'resbyteries of Trinidad, 
NTaitland, Superior, Victoria and llonan. He chooses to sit as a Commissioner from 
the Presbytery of Trinidad, and your Committee recommends that his name be 
removed from the list of Commission), rs of the other Presbyteries above named. 

Mr. J. A. Macdonald has been returned as a Commissioner from the Presbyteries 
of Westminster, Edmonton and Regina. He elects to represent the Presbytery of 
Westminster, c-tnd your Committee recommends that his name be removed from the 
Kdmonton and Regina lists. 

Mr. George Mitchell has been returned as a Commissioner from the Presbyteries 
of Brandon and Calgary. He chooses to represent the latter, and your Committee 
recommends that his name be removed fi'om the Brandon list. 

Mr. D. Morrice is a Commissioner from his own Presbytery, Montreal, and your 
Committee recommends that his name be removed from the lists forwarded by the 
Presbyteries of Kamloops and Kootenay. 

The Rev. Professor Falconer, whose name as a minister is on the roll of Halifax 
Presbytery, has been chosen as a Clerical Commissioner by the Presbytery of Calgary. 
In the opinion of your Committee, he was not eligible for electi(m by the Presby- 
tery of Calgary, and the Committee recommends that his name be removed from the 
-Calgary list. 

Your Committee would suggest the desirability of more uniformity in the matter 



[1032] 



OF TIIK I'UKsHYTKHlAN OHIMICH IN CANADA. 



18 



of reportiiijj or not niportitiij tho ftciwlomir Ualiis of thone choNeii OomiiUHHinnom to 
.\«oml)ly. Homo rroMhylnry ClorkH niiiit hII lefun'nco to ncHdoiiiio dcKret!! ; othnrn lot 
fiM'tli tliu ilttf^rooN li«)ld liy their (JomiiiiartioiierN ; niul utiiuri, still, net forth thu ilo^ruoa 
hold by Home Hiid omit nil rofuroiicu to thoiH which othurH of thoir ComniiiiHioiiorii ttre 
ui|U>iUy uiititlcil to. Voiir ('oiiimittiu< think, thnt in Mmkini; up tlio otliciiil roll of 
AHnonilily, noniu rulu rti^uliitin^ thin nmttor nhoiild h« itnpHrti)tlly ntrriud out. 

OHKRTINO KKOM THK KKM'KHAN HV.NOH OK NOVA HCOTIA. 

A doputiition from tho Dioouniiii Synod of Nova Hcotin, ooiiHintin^ of Ari-hdi>iicon 

Kitullokoh imd Kurikl Duau ArniitHi^tt, uppoHrcd oii tho floor of thu AHKvinlily, nnd wkh 

iiitroducud to thu Modunitor, liuitrin^ thu following; ruHolution of ^reutiii^ to tho 

AHHcmhly ; 

Hamh-a.i, N.S., ./.(»(.• /}//(, /.WO. 

\{K\ . !)K. I'oI.I.OK, 

!)KAit Sir : Tliu Diocumtii Synod of Novh Scutia, in Hosnion HHsunililud, thin morning 
piiSHud tho following ruHolution : 

" Thiit tho Synod of tiilH diocese dosires to convoy its jjrootings to tho I'roHhytorian 
(joiusriil AHsembly now in suHfiion in lliilifiix, and to cxpreHs the hope thiil its deliherK- 
tioii.i limy liu liluBsed to thu ^lory of <iod and thu liuildin^ up of IliH Kini^dom upon 
oifth." 

The mover anil Hecoiider were appointed by tho Synod to present the samu t(j tho 
Moderator of the Assembly. 

F. NOVA SCOTIA. 
W. .1. ANCIKNT, 

ClfHral Sertt'tary. 
U. .1. WILSON, 

//((;/ Secretary. 

Mr. Armita<,'e added a few words to tho formal resolution of the Synod. 

Thereupon I'rincipal Grant moved, seconded by Dr. Sedgwick : — 

That a deputation be sent to the Diocesan Synod of Nova Scotia, cordially reci- 
procating tho kindly feelingH expressed in the resolution transmitted to this Assembly, 
and desiring for them all fulnosH of blessing from our ccmnnon Lord. 

The motion was carried unanimously, and in accordance therewith, Principal Cavon, 
Corti-enef, Principal Grant, Dr. Si-dgwick and (Jeorj^'o Mitchell, M.l'. P., were appointed 
a deputation to convey tho Assembly's resolution to the Diocesan Synod of Nova Scotia. 

AlTOtNT.MK.NT OK COMMmUKS. 

The Moderator, a;j re(|uestud at a previous sederunt, submitted the names that he 
had selected to form the following Committees : 



C'OMMITTKK ON KEt'Kl'TIO.NS OF MINISTERS. 

Dr. Forrest — Conretifr. 

Messrs. .Tames Maclean, Prof. Falconer, Dr. Sedgwick, D. .1. Fraser, Dr. K. P. 
MacKay, Dr. Carmichael, D. D. McLeod, Dr. John Somerville, Dr. S. Lyle, W. H. 
McTavish, Dr. .Jas. Robertson, Prof. Hart, G. P. Tattrie, G. W. Th()mp.son, S. J, 
Taylor, D. Mc.G. (dandier. Dr. Herridge— iV/((ti,s^f;,s ; and Messrs. .J. D. Fraser, .Jas. 
Law, D. T. Fraser, .T. H, Reid, Henry Glendenning, Geo. Bryce, Walter Paul and 
Judge Stevens — Elders. 

COMMITTKE ON THE RECEPTION OF STL'UENTS, 

Dr. Moore — Convener. 

. ■ [1033] 



24 ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



I 



I 



Dr. A. Findlay, Messrs. Neil Shaw, And. Rowat, John Neil, Jas. Hodges, R. D. 
Frtiser, a. J. Mowatt, Wm. Patterson, Dr. Morison, C. B. Pitblado, A. S. Morton, J. 
S. Carruthers, Henry Dickie, Geo. Millar — Ministera; and Messrs. J. R. Reid, Walter 
Paul, W. B. McMurrich, Robert Murray, T. C. James, J. Cameron, and A. M. 
Hamilton — Eldfrs. 

COMMITTED ON RKCORDS. 

General Assembly — Dr. Sedgwick, Convener, J. B. MuUan, Chas. H. Cooke. 

Synod of Maritime Provinces — R. Gamble, Convener, John McLeod and Wm. 
Hamilton. 

Synod of Montreal and Ottawa — J. Neil, Convener, N. Campbell and S. Waddell. 

Synod of Toronto and Kingston — D. Tait, Convener, J. E. Duclos and D. Mc- 
Cormick. 

Synod of Hamilton and London — Jas. Cormack, Convener, Dan. Strachan and 
A. G. Farrell. 

Synod of Manitoba and North- West Territories — Dr. Scrimger, Convener, A. H. 
Scott and Geo. Keith. 

Synod of British Columbia— D. Stiles Eraser, Convener, J. R. Munro and R. 
Baxter. 

Presbytery of Indore— J. F. Dustan, Convener, J. F. Forbes and T. C. James. 

Presbytery of Honan — G. A. Leek, Convener, Geo. Fisher and John Willett. 



COMMITTEE TO STRIKE STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Rev. Dr. A. Falconer — Convener, 

Messrs. Alfred Gandier, D. J. Fraser, E. Scott, Dr. Moore, James Cormack, J. 
McD. Duncan, Dr. Somerville, R. J. M. Glassford, Dr. Thompson, J. A. Anderson, 
George Munro, S. C. Murray, Joseph Hogg and A. B. Winchester — Ministers ; and 
Messrs. Robert Murray, G. Mitchell, M.P.P., Jas. Rodger, George Keith, J. A. 
MacdonUd, George Rutherford and A. I. McKenzie — Elders. 



f.l 



COMMITTEE ON REMITS. 

Rev. Dr. Somerville, Convener. 

Messrs. W. P, Archibald, T. F. Fotheringham, D. Tait, J. L. George, James 
Cormack, W. Patterson, W. E. Roxburgh, James Bain and A. G. Farrell. 

The nomination of the Moderator, as to the composition of these committees, was 
approved of. * , . 

The Assembly adjourned to meet in this place, this evening, at a quarter to eight 
o'clock, whereof public intimation having been given, this Sederunt was closed with the 
benediction by the Moderator. 



FOURTH SEDERUNT. 



Af^the same place, on the same dan, at a quarter to eiijht o'clock in the evening: 

The General Assembly met, as per adjournment, and was duly constituted, Dr. Lyle 

leading in prayer, at the request of the Moderator. 

The minutes of the afternoon Sederunt were read and confirmed. 

[1034] 






OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



HOMK MISSION REPORT, EASTERN SECTION. 



m 



The Assembly called for the report of the Home Mission Committee, Eastern Section, 
which was presented by Dr. McMillan, Convener, and which, being printed and in the 
hands of members, he called attention to in his address. Mr. T. Fowler offered the 
following resolution by way of disposing of the report : — 

The General Assembly receives and adopts the report of the Home Mission Com- 
mittee, Eastern Section, and records its gratitude to God for the manifold tokens of His 
favor granted to their work and workers during the past year. The AssemVjly highly 
appreciates the continued liberality of the people in the Synod of the Maritime Pro- 
vinces, and rejoices that they manifest hearty sympathy with the efforts put forth by 
the Committee for the consolidation and extension of the Church, by removing the debt 
on the Home Mission Fund at the beginning of the year, and by contributing two 
thousand three hundred and fifteen dollars for the work in the North- West. The 
Assembly sorrows with the Committee on account of the death of their efficient Secre- 
tary, Rev. Dr. Morrison, whose intimate acquaintance with all the congregations of the 
Synod, sound judgment, wise counsel and unfailing kindliness aided greatly in making 
the Committee's work pleasant and successful. The Assembly commends anew this 
important scheme to the generous support of the congregations of the Synod, and p -»ys 
that in imparting blessings to others, they may be abundantly blessed themselves. 

The resolution was seconded by Mr. T. C. James and adopted. 



HOME MISSIONS, WESTERN SECTION. 

The Assembly next called for the Report of the Home Mission Committee, Western 
Section, which was given in by Dr. Warden, Convener, and to which, being printed and 
in the hands of members, he directed attention in his remarks anent the claims of 
Home Missions. 

He closed with moving, seconded by Dr. Robertson, the following resolution : — 

The General Assembly receives and adopts the Report of the Home Mission Com- 
mittee (Western Section) with the exception of the recommendation on page seventeen, 
bearing on the lengthening of the time of students' preparation for the ministry, said 
recommendation to be considered along with certain overtures coming before the General 
Assembly anent the more efficient supply of Home Mission field a ; the Assembly records 
its gratitude to God for the large measure of success that has accompanied the labors of 
the past year, and its high appreciation of the self-denying service of the missionaries 
through whom that success was achieved ; it notes with satisfaction the efforts made to 
overtake the needs of new settlements and to provide for the evangelization of the for- 
eign people settling in Western Canada ; the Assembly would impress on all her sons, 
especially on the graduates from her Colleges, the duty, in the interests of patriotism 
and religion, of giving due weight to the claims of the Home Mission field in frontier 
districts ; the Assembly cordially approves of the action of the Committee of Women in 
sending nurses to Atlin, congratulates them on the valuable service rendered to human- 
ity through the nurses, and commends this work to the women of the Church ; the 
General Assembly hereby tenders its cordial thanks to British Churches and congrega- 
tions for the help rendered last year, and expresses the hope that tho- may still continue . 
their good offices, especially in view of the increased immigration from Britain, and the 
large inflow of alien races from the continent of Europe ; and the General Assembly 
commends the work of Home Missions anew to the generous support of all the members 



[1035] 






4 



i 



26 ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

and adherents of the Church, and urges them to increase their contributions to such an 
extent that the Committee may be able to keep pace with settlement. 

The resolution was carried unanimously. 

Rev. John Pringie, Missionary in the Yukon territory, addressed the Assembly as 
to the nature of the work in which he and his fellow-laborers in that diflicult field are 
engaged. 

INVITATION TO MAPLEWOOn. 

An invitation from Mrs. MacKeen of Maple wood, for Monday, eighteenth .Tune, at 
five o'clock, was extended to the members of the General Assembly and their wives, and 
on motion, duly seconded, the Assembly resolved to accept the same. 

The Assembly adjourned to meet again in this place to-morrow morning at ten 
o'clock, whereof public intimation having been given, this Sederunt was closed with Mie 
benediction by the Moderator. 



FIFTH SEDERUNT. 



At Halifax, and iinHiin St. Mattheio's Glinrch lltere, the fifteenth day of Jinie, One 
thousand nine hundred, at ten o clock in the forenoon: 

The General Assembly met, pursuant to adjournment, and was constituted with 
devotional exercises, Dr. R. Hamilton leading in prayer, at the request of the 
Moderator. 

The minutes of last Sederunt were read and sustained. 



W 



COMMITTEE ON BILLS AND OVERTURES. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on Bills and Overtures, 
which was given in and read by Mr. J. Farquharson, Clerk of the Committee, who 
moved its reception and ado[)tion. The motion was seconded and agreed to. 

The following is the docket : 

1. Appointment of Committee to arrange for su{)ply of Assembly pulpit. 

2. Appointment of Committee on Loyal Addresses. 

3. That a reference from the Presbytery of Indore be the order of business for a 
quarter to eleven o'clock this morning, with the recommendation that, after the reading 
of the extract minute of the Presbytery, the reference be placed in the hands of a 
Judicial CumniiLtes Ui be appointed by the Moderator. 



COMMITTEE OS SABBATH SERVICES. 

As requested, the Moderator named a Connnittee on Sabbath services, as follows : — 
Mr. Thomas Fowler, Convener ; Dr. Campbell (Clerk) and Mr. W. Mortimer Clark. 

AGEP AND INFIRM MINISTERS' KUND, EASTERN SECTION. 

The Assembly called for the report of the C(jmmittee on the Aged ana Infirm 
Ministers' Fund, Eastern Section, which was (jresented by Mr. Anderson Rogers, 
Convoicr, who explained its salient features. Mr. T. Cumming moved the reception 



[1036] 



ill 



OF THE PUESHYTERIAN CHURCH IX CANADA. 



27 



and adoption of the report. The motion was seconded by Mr. J. F. Forbes, and 
adopted. 

Mr. J. R. Munro moved : 

That the application of the Presbytery of Truro on behalf of Mr. William H. 
Ness, that he receive an annuity of one hundred dollars, from October fifth, eighteen 
hundred and ninety-nine be adopted. The motion was seconded and agreed to. 

Moved by Mr. Thomas Cumining, seconded by Mr. William M. Tutt'ts : 

That Mr. James McLean receive a full annuity from the date of hia retirement 
from active duties. The motion was adopted. 

On motion, duly seconded, Mr. D. McLeod, of Borrowston, was admitted to the 
privile'j;es of the Fund, on payment of arrears, in terms of the regulations of the fund. 

REB'ERENCE FROM THE PRESBYTERY OK INOORE. 

The Committee on Bills and Overtures, throu<4h its Clerk, submitted a report 
recommending that the reference from the F'resbytery of Indore be now considered, 
and that after the extract minutes of Presbytery bearing on the matter are read, the 
reference be referred to a Judicial Committee to be appointed by the Moderator. The 
recommendation was adopted. Extract minutes of the Presbytery of Indore of date 
eighth of December, eighteen hundred and ninety-nine, and eighth February, nineteen 
hundred, were read. Dr. Warden reported that the reference itself was not attested when 
it reached his hands, but that Mr. F. H. Russell, one of the Commissioners from 
Indore Presbytery, had ap[)eared before the Committee on Bills and Overtures, and 
verbally attested the reference '.s that adopted l)y the Presbytery. The documents 
were, on motion, rec-eived and referred to the .ludicial Committee to be appointed. 

APi'LICATION TO RECEIVE MR. .1. H. REID. 

An application was made by the Presbytery of Westminster for leave to receive 
Mr. .J. G. Reid into the ministry of this Church. 

On motion, duly seconded, it was resolved to remit the application for the 
consideration of the Committee appointed to deal with such applications. 



AOKI> A.NI> INFIRM MINISTERS FUND, WESTERN SECTION. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on the Aged and Infirm 
Ministers' Fund, Western Section, which was given in and read, in the absence of the 
CdHcetier, by Mr. A. H. Scott, and which, being printed and in the hands of members 
of Assembly, he called attentit)n to in his reniarks on tlu.^ same. 

Mr. Scott moved the reception of the report and the consideration of its recom- 
mendations seriatim. The motion was seconded by Mr. James Anderson, and adf)pted. 

On motion of Mr. Scott, duly seconded : 

The Assembly gave power to the Committee of the Western Section to receive all 
applicants on payment of the proper rate. 

On motion of Mr. Scott, duly seconded, the recommendations of the Committee 
regarding Mr. Turnbull, Dr. Parsons, Mr. Andrew Hudson, Mr. A. Campbell and Mr, 
D. (j. Cameron, were adopted. 

On motion, duly seconded, it was agreed to remit the cases of Mr. E. Mullan and 
Mr. .James Cameron to the Connnittee for further consideration. 

The reconimendatioi! of the Committee regarding Mr. Norman McPhee was also 
on motion, duly seconded, agreed to. 

[1037] 



•■ I 



hi 



28 ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



II 



III 



The recommendation of the Committee as to the deferred annuity scheme was, 
on motion, duly seconded, adopted. 

On motion of Mr. Scott, seconded by Dr. A. B. McKay, it was resolved that the 
report aa a whole, as amended, along with the recommendations, be adopted, and that 
the thanks of the General Assembly are due to the Committee on the Fund, and that 
special acknowledgment be accorded to the Convener of the Committee for his pains- 
taking labour during the year. 

MINI.STKRS' widows' AND OKl'HAHS' FUXU, MAKITIMK PKOVINCES. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Ministers' Widows' and Orphans' Fund 
of the Maritime Provinces, which was presented by Dr. Sedgwick, in the absence of the 
Convener, and which, being printed and in the hands of members, he called attention 
to in his remarks thereanent. 

He concluded by moving the reception and adoption of the report. This was 
seconded by Dr. Moore and agreed to. 



ministers' widows' and orphans' fund, church of SCOTLAND SECTION. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Ministers' Widows' and Orphans' Fund. 
Church of Scotland Section, which was presented by Dr. Campbell, Chairman of the 
Board, and which, being printed and in the hands of members, he called attention to. 
He moved, seconded by Mr. J. B. MuUan the reception and adoption of the report. 
The motion was carried. 






MINISTERS WIDOWS AND ORPHANS FUND, WESTERN SECTION. 

The Assembly next called for the Report of the Ministers' Widows' and Orphans' 
Fund, Western Section, which was presented, in the absence of the Convener, b)' Dr. 
Warden, who drew attention to its leading features as printed and in the hands of 
members. 

He moved the reception and adoption of the report. The motion was seconded by 
Dr. Torrance and agreed to. 

The Assembly adjourned to meet in this place, this afternoon, at half-past two 
two o'clock, whereof public intimation having been given, this Sederunt was closed 
with the benediction by the Moderator. 



SIXTH SEDERUNT. 



At the same place, and o)i the same day, at half-pad tiro o'clock in the afternoon: 

The General Assembly met, pursuant to adjournment, and was constituted with 
prayer by the Moderator. 

The minutes of the last Sederunt were read and sustained. 

[1038] 



OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



|ft 



JUDICIAL COMMITTEE. 

The Moderator named, aa requested, a Judicial Committee, as follows : 

Dr. A. B. MacKay — Convener. 

Professor Falconer, Dr. Forrest, Dr. Sedgwick, Messrs. A. S. Morton, Dr. 
Campbell (Perth), Donald Tait, Robert Gamble, Principal Caven, Dr. Somerville, D. D. 
McLeod, J. G. Stuart, Archibald McLean, Dr. Lyle, James Farauharson, Dr. Robert- 
8on, C. B. Pitblado, S. C. Murray — Ministers ; and Judge Stevens, James Rodger, John 
R. Reid, W. Mortimer Clark, James Bain, A. I. McKenzie, William Haddow, Professor 
W. C. Murray, D. W. McGuaig and Senator MacKeen — Elders. 

The nomination of the Moderator was approved of. 



SABBATH 8ERVICKH. 

The Aasembly called for the Report of the Committee on Sabbath services, which 
was given in and read by Mr. Thomas Fowler, Convener, who moved its reception and 
adoption. 

The motion was seconded and agreed to. The report in as follows 

The Committee begs leave to recommend as follows : 

1. That Rev. A. B. Winchester be appointed to conduct divine service in this 
church at 11 a.m., and Rev. John Neil, B.A., at 7 p.m. 

2. That a Communion Service be held at 4 p.m., the Modera*'.or to preside, to be 
assisted by Principal Caven and Rev. .J. F. Forbes, and that the following elders be 
asked to officiate : — Messrs. R. Baxter, W. Mortimer Clark, D. Torrance Fraser, 
George Grant, S. G. Mathieson, George Mitchell, M.P.P., Walter Paul, J. R. Reid, W. 
R. Ross, George Rutherford, Judge Stevens and W. C. Whittaker. 



I »> 



of 

by 



ith 



REPORT ON RKMITS. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on Remits, which was given in 
and read by Dr. Somerville, Convener, who moved its reception and the consideration of 
its recommendations seriatim. The motion was seconded and adopted. 

The following is the report of the Committee : 

Your Committee appointed to consider answers to the Remits sent down to Presby 
teries, begs leave to report as follows : — 

I. Re College of ex-Moderators. 

Thirty-four Presbyteries report. Of these 

Twenty-three disapprove simpliciter. 

Seven approve simpliciter. 

Four suggest radical changes in the method proposed. 

II. Re extension of powers of Synods, sent down in terms of the Barrier Act. 

Thirty-three Presbyteries report. Of these 
Twenty-three approve simpliciter. 
Six disapprove simpliciter. 
Three approve with changes. 
One reports no action. 

III. Presbyteries have also sent returns to the General Assembly regarding : 
(1). Aids to Social Worship. 

(2). Proposed regulations regarding Deferred Annuities. 
(3). Probationers' Scheme, left over from last year. 



[1039] 



30 ACTS AND I'ROCEEnrXGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH OENEUAL ASSEMIJLY 

As fcheHe returns were ordered to be sent to the committees in ch irge of such mat- 
ters, your Committee has not tabulated them. 

BKCOSIMENnATION.-i VP REMITS. • 

1. Jie College of ex-Moderators. That no action be taken. 

2. /vV extension of the powers of Synods, that inasmuch as this matter was sent 
down under the terms of the Barrier Act, ana a minority of the Presbyteries have 
approved, your Committee recommends that nu action be taken. 

.'i. Your Connnittee further recommends that the returns on Aids to Social Worship, 
Regulations on Deferred Annuities, and Prol)ationers' Scheme be sent to the committees 
in charge of such matters. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

The tirst recommendation was agreed to. 

The second rec(jmmLMidation was amended to read that the Remit be again sent 
down to Presbyteries, in terms of the liarrier Act, with instructions to Presl)y teries to 
report to Dr. Warden not later than Fel)ruary 28th next. 

The third recommendation was agreed to. 

On motion of Dr. Somerville, duly seconded, the rej)ort, as a wiiole, thus amended, 
was adopted. 



IIEI'OUT O.N S.AIJHATH SCHOOL PUBLICATIONS. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on Sabbath School Publi- 
cations, which was presented by Dr. Warden, Convener, and which, being printed and 
in the hands of members, he referred to in speaking of the work of the Committee. 

Rev. R. D. Fraser addressed the Assembly, giving particulars regarding the publi- 
cations. 

Dr. Thoujpson moved the following resolution, which was seconded by Dr. A. B. 
MacKay, and adopted : — 

The (Jeneral Asseml)ly has heard with gratification the very encouraging report of 
the Committee on Sabbath School Publications, given in by the Convener, and notes 
with pleasure the great advancement made during the year in the additional matter 
provided in the Leasan Hdps, the high standard of the work, both in matter and form, 
and the greatly increased circulation, shoving that these publications are rapidly finding 
their way into the confidence and life of the Church. 

It ia also matter of congratulation that the transformation of The Gliildren's liertird 
into an illustrated weekly, under •'.he name of The Kimfs Oir)i, has been successfully 
accomplished, and that both The Kiuf/s Own and Jeioels, the illustrated paper for 
the little ones, have already attained a large circulation. 

The financial aspect of the imdertakiug i-i suojially gratifying and warrants the 
Committee in seeking still further improvement. It has greatly strengthened the hands 
of the Committee that their efforts have so speedily met with such ready and generous 
support on the part of the Church. And, in order to make these publications, which is 
now the established policy of this Assembly, still more successful, and to secure their 
more general adoption, the practical co-oi)erHtion of ministers, elders, superintendents 
and Sabbath School workers generally is earnestly solicited. 

Special reference is hereby made to the very able and etticient work of our editor, 
Rev. R. D. Fraser, M.A., whoso labours are the chief cause of the remarkable success 
attendinj' this branch of the Church's work. 



[1040] 



OK TUK I'HESBYTERIAN CHUIirH 1\ CANADA. 



31 



n 



ly 



10 



CENTl'llV kunh. 

The AH8emI)ly called for tlie Report of the Century Fund Couiinittee, which wiis 
given in by Dr. Warden, Cnnrmii'i-, the salient features of which he emphasized in pre- 
8ontin<; the same. Me concluded l)y moving the following resolution, seconded by 
Dr. Campl)el], At,'ent for the scheme : — 

The General Assembly receives the report ; expre.sses thankfulness to God for 
the measure of success attained and for the interest so largely manifested by our 
Congregations, our Voung Peoples' Societies and Sabbath Schools ; earnestly commends 
the scheme to the lielp of congregations yet uncaw/assed and to the further and 
more systematic liberality of many in which the canvass has been begun, being 
affectionately desirous that an opportunity should be given to every family, adherent, 
young person and child, in every station, to express thoir gratitude to (Jod and to 
give freely to this movement, as lie his freely given 'o them. 

The Assembly again commends the C(mimon Fund, so necessary for the right 
equipment and extension of the Church's enterprises, to the consideration of all ccm- 
gregations, and to the special consideration of the f)lder, stronger, more C()m^)rtably 
situated and better organized congregations who, as is believed, would not sufl'er but 
be ble.ssed even were they to leave their debt very much in the background, and 
who, remembering how they were gladly helped and gladly received help in e;irly 
days, should now account it a privilege to helj) others rather than to think chieHy of 
themselves. 

The General Assembly, believing that the stage has been reached when an 
appeal on behalf of the Common Fund may fitly au'l h(»[)efiilly be made to niembers 
and adherents of our Church, who have been much jirospered and endowed with 
larger means, affectionately commends that fund to their generous sup|)ort ; further, 
the Executive is instructed to take such action as may secure such support, and, for this 
purpose, are empowered to add tc their number as they may deem it necessary. 

The Assembly reappoints the Executive, substituting Dr. Milligan for Mr, L. H. 
.Jordan, the Literature Committee and the Synodical Advisory Committee ; appoints 
Rev. E. Scotf, Convener of the Advisory Committee for the Synod of Montreal and 
Ottawa, and Mr. MacBeth, a member of the Advisory Committee <)f the Synod of 
British Columbia ; thanks those Committees for their diligence, and thanks the sub- 
agents, the Presbyterial Committees, members in charge of groups and others who, 
at much personal sacrifice, have furthered this moven)ent ; also the Sabbath School 
Committee and the Young Peoples' Society Committee f<jr their cordial co-operation. 

The Assembly earnestly solicits the hearty co-operation of all sessions, with a 
view to secure for the fund a generous contribution from every Sabbath School and 
Church, on Children's Day, in September next. 

The Genex'al Assembly atl'ectionately recommends that in our congregations, 
Sabbath Schools and all other organizations, j's well as in the home and in the closet, 
prayer be made so that, if God will, the most memorable result of passing from the 
nineteenth to the twentieth century shall be a time of great refreshing from Ilis 
presence ; and continues the sub-conmiittee of the Life and Work Committee, charged 
with pressing this point on the mind of the Church. 

The 'general Asseml)ly, believing that a further consultation of the Agent with the 
Presbyteries may l)e productive of excellent results, again clothes the Executive with 
power t(> arrange that dates of regular meetings of Presbytery may be changed, if 
necessary, and as bj' authority from Assembly, to permit of the Agent visiting them 
consecutively, and that in sections of the Church which the Agent cannot reach, some 

[1041] 



f '' ! ! 



M 



32 ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

other peraon may be delegated by the Executive to appear before a Presbytery or an 
arranged group of Presbyteries in his stead. 

It was then moved by Dr. Herridge, seconded by Dr. MacLaren : — 
That this Assembly desires to express its sincere appreciation of the zealous and 
successful labours accomplished by the Rev. Dr. Campbell, ex-Moderator and Agent of 
the Century Fund, and pledges its cordial assistance to him and those more immediately 
connected with him in bringing this monumental work to a successful issue. 
The motion was carried. 

I • - • 

DISTRIBUTION OF FKOBATIONEK8. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on the Distribution of Pro- 
bationers, which was presented by Dr. Torrance, Convener, who directed attention to the 
contents of the printed report in the hands of members. 

He concluded with moving the reception of the report. 

The motion was aeconded and agreed to. 

It was then moved by Dr. Warden, seconded by Mr. R. J. M. Glassford : — 

That the scheme for the supply of vacancies, embraced in the report, be remitted to 
a special committee to be appointed by the Moderator, said committee to report not later 
than Monday next. 

The motion was adopted. 

The Moderator named the following said comuiittee : — Mr. R. J. M. Glassford, 
Convener ; Messrs. Cumming, Hutt, D. Stiles Fraser, Ministers ; and Messrs. Paul, 
John Armstrong, Wellington Boulter, and James P. Fox, Elders. 

The nomination was approved. 

OVERTURE re TRAVELLING EXPENSES. 

There was presented and read an Overture from the Synod of British Columbia, 
bearing on the travelling expenses of commissioners to the General Assembly, laid over 
from last year, but there being no one present to support the same, the Assembly passed 
to the next business. ' 

REPORT ON THE PRESBYTERIAN RECORD. 

The Assembly called for the report of the Record, which was given in by Dr. 
Warden, Convener, who referred to the prosperous situation in which the publication is, 
as indicated in the printed report in the hands of members, and moved the reception and 
adoption of the report. The motion was seconded by Dr. R. Campbell (Clerk), and 
adopted. 



, TRANSFER OP CONGREaATION OF CRAWFORD. 

There was read a memorial from the Presbytery of Owen Sound, asking leave of the 
Assembly to transfer the congregation of Crawford within the bounds of that Presbytery, 
and of the Synod of Toronto and Kingston, to the Presbytery of Bruce, within the 
bounds of the Synod of Hamilton and London. There was also read a communication 
from the Presbytery of Bruce, signifying its willingness to receive the congregation of 
Crawford under its care. 

On motion of Dr. Warden, seconded by Mr. James Anderson, it was resolved to 
grant the prayer of the memorial of the Presbytery of Owen Sound. 

i V , [1042] / . ,. 



f 



OF THE I'HKSHYTEUIAN CHUIirn 1\ CAN'AnA. 



WOMAN S MISSIONARY HOCIKTY OF MONTKKAL. 



33 



There whh read an extract minute from the Pre8l)ytery of Montreal relating to the 
work accomplished by the Woman's Missionary Society of that Presbytery, and forward- 
ing an abstract of the proceedings of said Society for the past year. 

It was agreed, on motion of Dr. Warden, seconded by Mr. Walter Paul, to receive 
the said abstract, with an expression of the Assembly's warm appreciation of the energy 
and zeal of the Society, and of the special "ratification felt at the Society's recent 
extension of its sphere of operations. 

HOUR OF AIUOURNMKNT TO-MOUKOW. 

Dr. Black moved that the hour of adjournment to-morrow be twelve o'clock noon» 
not half-past twelve. This motion was seconded, and a vote being taken thereon, it was 
carried by a majority. 

liKANTFORK LAhlEs' COLLEtiE. 

The Assembly called for the report of the Ladies' College, Brantford, which was 
presented by Dr. Warden, and which, being printed and in the hands of members, he 
called attention to. He concluded with moving that the Assembly receive and adopt 
the report, and commend the Institution anew to the confidence and patronage of the 
Church. 

The motion was seconded by Mr. Hutt, and agreed to. 

Mr. Gustavus Munro and Mr. J. B. Mullan were appointed the Assembly's visitors 
for the year. 

OTTAWA ladies' COLI.EOE. 

The Assembly called for the report of the Ladies' Ci)llege, Ottawa, which was pre- 
sented, in the absence of the Chairman of the Board, by Mr. AH. Scott, who called 
attention to the cheering situation of the institution and its improving prospects. 

He moVed, seconded by Mr. Walter Paul : 

That the (General Assembly receive and adopt the report of the Presbyterian Ladies 
College, Ottawa ; express satisfaction with the encouraging statements contained therein; 
commend the institution to the confidence and patronage of the Church, and appoint the 
following as the Board of (iovernors ror the current year, viz : — Dr. Herridge, Dr. Arm- 
strong, Dr. Moore, Rev. D. M. Rumsay, Professor Scrimger, Rev. A. H. Scott, Rev. J. 
R. McLeod, and Rev. Dr. Neil McNish, Messrs. Levi Crannell, George Hay, James 
Moodie, F. T. Frost, G. L. Orme and Walter Paul. 

On motion, duly seconded, the Moderator of the General Assembly and the 
Moderator of the Synod of Montreal and Ottawa, were appointed visitors to the College 
for the year. 

The Assembly adjourned, to meet in this place this evening, at a (juarter to eight 
o'clock, whereof intimation having been given, this Sederunt was closed with the bene- 
diction by the Moderator. 



if il 






»i 



SEVENTH SEDERUNT. 



At the same plare, and on the same day, at a ijunrter to eujht o'clock in the ecenimj : 

The General Assembly met, as per adjournment, and was constituted with devo 

[1043] 



34 ACTS AND rnOCEEniXGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMHLY 

tiuiml exorcises, I'rinciiml M>icVictir leading in prayer at the request of the Moderator. 
The minutes of last Sederunt were, on motion of Principal MacVicar, dulyae^^onded, 
held over to be read to-morrow morning, along with the minutes of this Sederunt. 

KOIIKIUN MIHSION8 IIEI'ORT. 

i'he Assembly called for the lloport of the Foreign Mission Committee, which was 
pre.^ented by Dr. Moore, Convener of the Western Division, and which, 'uoing printed 
and in the hands of members, he drew attention to, concluding with moving the follow- 
ing nerios of resolutions, seccmded by Dr. Falconer : — 

That the (ieneral Assembly receive and adopt the Report and resolve : — 

1. To express gratitude to God for the mercies and encouragements that have been 
granted to our missionaries laboring in our different tiulds during the past year. 

2. To record their sympathy with those missionaries who, on account of the exces- 
sive strain of their conditions and work, have suffered in health, and pray that they may 
be sustained in afHiction, and restored in due time to health, and to the service to which 
their lives are devoted. 

."{. To record their satisfaction with the liberal response of the Church to the cry for 
help that comes from the famishing millions in India, and express approval of the action 
of the Foreign Mission Committee in applying these funds to the saving of life by the 
relief of present distress and also in receiving < t'phan children in order to save their 
lives and train them up in the knowledge of the (iospel of the grace of (Jod. 

4. To express gratitude to C4od that our missionaries in Honan have hitherto been 
protected from the many dangers to which they were exposed, and ask the united 
prayers of the Church that they may be delivered from all evil ; and that the important 
movements taking place in China may be over-ruled for the evangelization of that great 
country and the universal enlargement of the kingdom of Jesus Christ, 

The resolutions were carried. 

KEY. WILLIAM (JAlLlt's AttDRESS. 

The Moderator introduced to the Assembly, Mr. William Gauld, Missionary to For- 
mosa, who gave an interesting account of the work doing in that distant field, especially 
emphasizing the self-sustaining principles inculcated upon the converts connected with 
the mission. 



1, 



OK. MOUTON S ADDRESS. 

The Moderator then called upon Dr. Morton, for upwards of thirty-two years in the 
service of the Church as a missionary in Trinidad, to address the Assembly. Dr. Morton 
referred to the interesting problem of dealing with the minds of the natives of India in 
the new circumstances in which they are found in the West Indies, and shewed that 
while the.'e were advantageous features in the situation of the coolies, the constant 
accession to the population from India keeps them still largely under heathen influences. 
He made a strong plea for closer intercourse, commercially and otherwise, between 
Trinidad and Canada, as likely to be helpful to the missions of the Church. 



KEV. F. H. RUSSELL S ADDRESS. 



After the singing of a hymn, the Moderator introduced Mr. F. H. Russell, mission- 
ary in India, who pleaded for a deeper interest on the part of the people of Canada in 
the millions of India, bound to them by the ties of a common heritage in the British 

[10J4] 



OF THE PHESBYTEUIAN CHUltrH IN CANADA. 



35 



Empire'; for an increase in the number uF wnrkerM, who are overtasked ; and shewed 
the importance of taking over as largely an poHHil>lu the care of the young, in gaining an 
influence over whom the hope of the mission re^illy lies ; the opportunity atfordud Wy the 
present distressing famine being great, as the people were having recourse to the misHion 
stations in large numbers, as ho many refuges. 






HKV. W. II. tIKANTS ADDKEHH. 

Mr. VV. H. Qrant, home on furlough from Honan, was next introduced to the 
Assembly, and gave an interesting account of the present disturbances in China, showing 
that the country is honeycombed with secret societies, that of the lioxers being of recent 
origin and being specially directed against foreign influences. !So far, the niissionaries of 
the Church in Honan had been exempt from danger, but there was no telling how long 
this happy situation might continue. He concluded with urging that not Western civil- 
ization, but Christianity alone could save China. 

REV. .1. WILKIK's AKDRESS. 

The Moderator next introduced Mr. .1. Wilkie, of the Indore Mission, who referred 
to the invincible prejudices created by caste ; to the succe-sses attained specially among 
the low caste portion of the population, and also emphasized the crisis through which 
India is passing, occasioned not only by the famine, but also by the unrest evinced by 
the educated young men of the country who are assuming the role of agitators. 



h "i 



RRV. A. U. WINCHESTER S ADDRESS. 

The last of the foreign missionaries introduced to the Assembly was Mr. A. B. 
Winchester, in charge of the Chinese missions on the Pacific coast of the Dominion, who 
entered a powerful plea for fair play to the Chinamen who come to our country in the 
enjoyment of treaty rights, defending them from the unjust aspersions cast. upon them 
by politicians who were trading on the question. He also cited instances to show that 
in spite of the feeling of unfair treatment which these foreigners entertained, not a few 
of them were receiving the Gospel. 

After the singing of another hymn, the Assembly adjourned to meet in this place 
to-morrow morning at ten o'clock, and this Sederunt was closed with the benediction by 
the Moderator. 



EICxHTH SEDERUNT. 






At Halifax, and icithin St. Matthew's Onurch there, the sixteenth day of June, One thous- 
and yiine hundred, at half -past ten o'clock in the morning : 

The General Assembly met, as per adjournment, and was constituted with devo- 
tional exercises, Mr. J. B. MuUan leading in prayer at the request of the Moderator. 
The minutes of last Sederunt were read and confirmed. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON LEGISLATION. 

The Assembly called for the report of the Committee on Legislation, which was 

[1045] 



t' 
J 



^ 



^' 



'M ACTS AND I'IKM'KKDINUS l)V TMK TWKNTV-SIXTll (JKNKIIAI, ASSKMIII.V 



presented hy Dr. Warden, Oonvcner, Mr. W. Mortimer Olwrk tiddroHied the Court, 
dwelling; on the ndvHnttigeH to he derived from Haid le^iNlation, and moved, and it waH 
duly Muoonded, and agreed to : 

That the AH8enil)ly receive and adopt the report, and continue the committee, to 
secure Huch further le){iHlation as may he rinjuired ; and that the TrustoeN elected l>y 
last AsHomhly be reappointed. 

KKI'OKT OK THK COMMITTKK ON OHl'IKJH I'KOI'KUTV. 

The AHHomhly called for the Report of tho (/ommitt«<e on Church Property, which, 
in the abnence of tho Conifiu't; Hon. .luHtice MacLennan, was preaontud by Dr. War- 
den, and is as follows ; 

1. The Committee on the Protection of Church Property to whom was referred the 
Petition of Mary Webber, of the City of Hamilton, widow, presented to the General 
Assembly on .June 16th, 1891), having; heard what was alleged by the Petitioner, who 
appeared personally before the Committee, and having considered the said Petition, beK 
leave to report as follows : 

2. In the year 18<.M) the congregation of Waterford, within the Presbytery of Ham- 
ilton, bein^ about to build a church, ob.tained from the Presbytery its sanction to raise 
money by mortgage. Thereupon a loan of a thousand dollars was obtained from the 
Petitioner, repayable, with interest, ono-half in two and the remainder in five years, 
and the trustees of the congregation mortgaged the Church property to her by way of 
security. 

;{. The Petitioner appears not to have taken any personal bond, covenant, or other 
oblii^ation for her debt from any rusponsible ))er8on, in addition to her mortgage. 

4. In making the loan, the Petitioner had the advice and assistance of a firm of 
solicitors who had acted for her in other matters. * 

5. Interest was duly paid upon the mortgage for several years, but in eighteen 
hundred and ninety-seven the congregation Secame dissolved and extinct, and it is said 
that the security is now not worth more thai e-third of the debt. 

6. Under the circumstances the Petitioner appeals for relief to the (general 
Assembly. 

7. The special ground upon which she rests her appeal is that she made the loan 
upon the re(]uest, as she alleges, of a legal firm who are prominent members of the 
Presbyterian Church, and that she did not examine the property, being led to believe 
by one of the members of the firm that the borrowers, being a Presbyterian congrega- 
tion, it was a choice investment and that there was not the remotest probability of the 
debt not being repaid. 

8. The Petitioner does not impugn, but expressly admits, the honesty of her 
solicitor in so advising her. 

9. Your Committee are of opinion that a very important and far-reaching principle 
is involved in the petition, namely, whether the Church at large, or the General Assem- 
bly, can or oucrht to assume responsibility for the due payment of congregational debts, 
and they are of opinion that it cannot and ought not to do so. 

10. Under the circumstances of this case, your Committee are of opinion that the 
Petitioner's loss is due to the want of ordinary care and prudence in making her invest- 
ment, and while sympathizing with her they are unable to see any substantial relief 
which it is in the power of the Assembly to afford her. 

11. As it may save expense to the Petitioner in disposing of the property, your 
Committee recommend that the General Assembly pass a resolution authorizing and 



[104«] 



OF TICK IMIKSMVTKIMAN cmTHCII IX CANADA. 



87 



diructiiiM tliu proHent TrtiRtuun, if she HhouI'd doHire it, to vxvcute h rel«M(* nf tlie equity 
of ru(leiii|>tinn in the property to thu I'etitioner. 

It WHS moved lij I>r. ('Htupliull, Clerk, luid duly Hucondud, thnt the ANnenihly 
receive itiul Hd'tpt the report, Htid phhh tho roHohitioii rccoiiiiuended by (he Coiiiiiuttee, 
" KUthoriziiii{ and diri>ctiii}{ the present TruHteea, if nIu) Hhoiild denire it, to execute a 
releHNe of the e<|uity of redemption in the property to the I'etitioner." 

The motion wns ndopted. 

It WHN Hfturwnrda moved hy Principnl (ir»nt, Noconded by Dr. lilnck : 

That till! I'reshytery of Ifnmilton in recommended, in view of till the circumatHnces, 
and i'.i-(iriilln, to appoal to thoHe menihorH of the Church whime aympiithieH are enliated 
in MrH. Webbur'a case, fur contributions to ennure her Hul^«rin^ no loaa, and to aak the 
aHaistance Npocially of the I'resbytery of I'aria in the matter. 

It waa moved in amendment by Dr. Campbell, Heconded by Mr. .1. D. McGrej^or: 

That the membera of AaNembly who Hympathi/.e with Mrs. Wobbor in her aituation, 
be allowed an opportunity of atlordin^' her relief. 

A vote being taken, the motion waa carried. 



t 



I'KTITloN OK .loHN I.AND.SUOIlOroM i-l til. 

There waa presented and read a petition from Mr. .John Landaborough and others, 
»-f]the will of the late Mrs. ./amea Carnochan. 

It waa on motion, duly aoconded. resolved to send the petition and relative docu- 
ments to a committee to bo named by the Moderator. 

The following Committee was named by the Moderator in accordance with the wish 
of the As-sembly : 

Dr. MacLaren, Convener, Dr. Black, Dr. Macrae, Dr. Thompson, Mesara. Paul, 
.1. D. McGregor and (leorge Mitchell. 

The nomination was approved. 



FORKIflN MISSION KSTIMATKS. 

The Assembly {called for the annunl cHtimates of the Foreign Mission Committee, 
which was submitted by the Clerk, and on motion, duly seconded, they were passed, and 
are as follows : 

KASTKUN KIVISION. 

New Hebrides $ «i,.".00 00 

Trinidad and St. Lucia 19,()0(» 00 

Demerara :{,500 Go 

Korea 4,000 (M» 

Interest and expenses HoO 00 

$.'{4,. •150 00 

WKSSTKHN DIVISION. 

India , $26,838 00 

Honan 15,524 00 

Shanghai 1,250 00 

Formosa 12,H50 00 

Chinese, B.C 4,1(J0 00 

Chinese, Montreal 1,900 00 

Indians, B.C 1,100 00 

[1047] 



\r 



38 ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

WESTERN DIVISION— Continued. 

Indians, N. W $6,173 00 

General Expenses 4,800 00 



$73,035 00 

woman's foreign missionary society, western section. 

India $35,840 00 

Honan . . 4,873 00 

Formosa 1,145 00 

Indians, N.W 10,104 00 

Indians, B.C 3,640 00 

Chinese, B.C 500 00 

$56,102 00 

AGENCY OP THE CHURCH, EASTERN SECTION. 

There was presented and read a communication from the Synod of the Maritime 
Provinces regarding the vacancy in the Agency of the Church, Eastern Section, become 
vacant by the death of Dr. Morrison. Dr. Falconer was heard in reference to the 
matter of the communication ; but the hour of adjournment having arrived, the further 
consideration of the subject had to be deferred. 

The Assembly adjourned to meet in this place on Monday, the eighteenth instant,, 
at ten o'clock in the forenoon, of which public intimation was given, and this Sederunt 
was closed with the benediction by the Moderator. 



NINTH SEDERUNT. 



At Halifax, and unthin St. Matthew's Church there, the eighteenth day of June, One 

thousand nine hundred, at ten o'clock in the forenoon: 

The General Assembly met as per adjournment, and was constituted with devotional 
exercises. Dr. Morton leading in prayer at the request of the Moderator. 

The minutes of last Sederunt were read and sustained. 

COMMITTEES ON BILLS AND OVERTURES. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on Bills and Overtures, which 
was given in and read by Mr. J. Farquharson , Clerk of the Committee, who moved its 
reception and the adoption of its recommendations. The motion was seconded and 
agreed to. 

The following is the docket recommended : 

1. Communication from the Maritime Provinces anent Agency, Eastern Section. 

2. Communication from Synod of Maritime Provinces re annuity to Mrs. Morrison. 

3. Petition of the Synod of British Columbia re Mr. Swartout. 

4. Overtures re Mission Work, from Synod of British Columbia and Presbytery of 
Algoma, and a communication from the Home Mission Committee on the same question ; 
and that these Overtures be the order of business for eleven o'clock this forenoon. 



[1048] 



OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



89 



5. A petition from Halifax Presbytery \-e Labrador Session. 

6. Overture from Owen Sound Presbytery re Assembly Remits. 

7. Overture from Owen Sound Presbytery re Term service of elders. 

8. Letter from Mr. Alexander Fraser anen* publishing speeches in Assembly. 
Orders of the day were fixed, — 1st, Appointing time and place of next General 

Assembly, at a quarter to three o'clock ; 2iid, Hearing the report of the Committee on 
the subject of the proposed changes in the constitution of Queen's College, at three 
o'clock. 

CHUKCH AIJEXCY, EASTERN SECTION. 

The Assembly resumed consideration of the communication from the Synod of the 
Maritime Provinces on the subject of the Church Agency, Eastern Section. 
It was moved by Dr. Falconer, seconded by Mr. E. Scott, and resolved : 

1. That the General Assembly sustain the action taken by the ex-Moderator, Dr. 
Campbell, in making temporary arrangements for the discharge of the duties connected 
with the Agent's office, rendered vacant by the death of Rev. P. M. Morrison, D.D. 

2. That the Rev. Edward A. McCurdy be and hereby is appointed Agent of the 
Eastern Section of the Church, as successor to the late Dr. Morrison, and on the same 
terms, and that the Presbytery of Halifax be instructed to take the necessary steps, in 
the event of his accepting the appointment, to place his name upon its roll. 

A committee consisting of Dr. Falconer and Messrs. E. Scott and Robert Murray 
was appointed to wait upon Mr. McCurdy, notifying him of his appointment, and 
ascertaining whether he agrees to accept the same. 






':,- 



Hf 



if n 



Iff : 



■i 



1? .; } 



ANXUITV TO MRS. MOURI80N. 



There was presented and read a communication from the Synod of the Maritime 
Provinces, asking that an annuity of $250 be paid during her lifetime to Mrs. Morrison, 
widow of Dr. Morrison, late agent of the Church — the amount to be paid from the funds 
of the Eastern Section. The request was agreed to unanimously. 



I.OYAL ADDRESSES. 

As requested, the Moderator appointed a committee to frame addresses to Her 
Majesty, the Queen, and His Excellency, the Governor-General, as follows : — Dr. 
Herridge, Convener ; Principal Grant, Dr. Scrimger and Mr. Robert Murray. 

The nomination was approved. 

PETITION re MR. SWARTOUT. 

There was presented and read a petition from the Synod of British Columbia 
regarding the status of Mr. Swartout, Missionary among the Indians on the Pacific 
Coast. Relative documents having also been read, it was, on motion of Dr. Moore, 
seconded by Mr. James Anderson, rciolved to remit the matters involved to a 
committee consisting of Dr. R. P. McKay, Convener ; Mr. Joseph Hogg, Dr. R. Torrance* 
and Mr. A. G. Farrell, to report on the same at an early sederunt. 



OVERTURES re HOME MISSION WORK. 



There were presented and read Overtures from the Synod of British Columbia and 
the Presbytery of Algoma, craving the Assembly to extend the period of study of 
Theological students to four years, one year to be devoted to practical work in the Home 

[1049] 



40 ACTS AND I'HOCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASS^-MBLV 



Mission field, bo as to secure continuity in the Home Mission service ; as also a recom- 
mendation from the Honm Mission Committee bearing on the same subject. Dr. 
Findlay, Mr. James Anderson, Dr. Robertson, Mr. Vetter and Dr. Warden were heard 
in support of the Overtures. Principal Grant was addressing the house on the subject 
when the hour of adjournment arrived. 

A letter was read from Mr. Alexander Fraser, proposing to publish a verbatim 
report of the speeches delivered in treating of the businer^s of the Assembly, provided a 
sufticient number of the members supported the proposal. On the recommendation of 
the Committee on Bills and Overtures, Mr. Fraser was given permission to place 
circulars bearing on the subject in the hands of members in the house. 

The Assembly adjourned to meet in this place this afternoon, at half-past two 
o'clock, of which public intimation was given, and this Sederunt was closed with the 
benediction by the Moderator. 






TENTH SEDERUNT. 



Hi 



li 1, it 



At the sume place, on the same day, at half-past two o'clock in the afternoon : 

The General Assembly met, as per adjournment, and was constituted with prayer 
by the Moderator. 

The minutes of last Sederunt were read and confirmed. 

OVERTURES re EXTB^M)ING THE PERIOD OF THEOLOr.ICAL STUDY. 

The Assembly resumed consideration of the Overtures relating to the question of 
extending the period of Theological training to four years. 

It was moved by Dr. Warden, seconded by Dr. Scrimger : — 

Receive the overtures and refer these, together with the recommendation of the 
Home Mission Committee (Western f ction) to the following Committee, to report to 
this Assembly : — Dr. R. Campbell, ex-Moderator, Convener; Dr. Moore, Dr. Somerville, 
Messrs. E. R. Hutt, D. Strachan, Principal Grant, Dr. Robertson, Dr. Scrimger, Dr. 
Findlay, Thomas Gumming, Donald Tait, J. A. Anderson, Dr. McLaren, Ministers ; 
Walter Paul, George Keith, Professor Dyde, A. G.Farrell, Elders. 

The motion was carried, 

TIME AND PLACE OF MEETING. 

The order of the day having arrived for fixing the time and place of next meeting 
of Assembly, 

A communication was read from the Presbytery of Toronto, forwarding an invita- 
tion to the Assembly from Bloor Street Church, Toronto, to meet in that church next 
year. 

It was moved by Principal Mac Vicar, seconded by Mr. Roderick MacLeod : 

That the next Assembly be held in Bloor Street Church, Toronto. 

An invitation having been tendered to the Assembly by the authorities of St. 
Andrew's Church, Ottawa, to meet in their church. 

It was moved by Dr. Moore, in amendment, seconded by Principal Grant : 

[1050] 



r 



OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IX CANADA. 



41 



L 



That the Assembly accept the invitation of St. Andrew's Church, Ottawa, and 
agree to meet in that Church on the second Wednesday of June, one thousand nine 
hundred and one, at eight o'clock in the evening. 

A vote being taken, the amendment was carried over the motion, and the Assembly 
decided accordingly. 

REPORT re CONSTITUTION OF QUEEN's COLLEliE. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on the Constitution of 
Queen's University and College, which was given in by Dr. Thompson, Convener, who 
moved its reception and the adoption of the following resolution : 

The Genv^ral Assembly is gratified by the proposal referred to in the report of 
(,>ueen'8 University, to have the Theological Faculty under the care of a special Board 
appointed by the Assembly, and would app ove of any well-considered change in the 
Constitution of the University, which would still further increase its usefulness by 
making the body of Trustees more completely representative of the undenominational 
character of the work which it is at present doing. 

In view of the great importance of having practical unanimity among the graduates 
and benefactors of the University, respecting the important changes in its constitution 
which have been proposed, the Assembly appoint a committee to confer with the 
Trustees of the University and aid them in obtaining a satisfactory solution of the 
whole question brought before it in the report of the University, Committee to report 
to next Assembly. 

The motion was seconded by Dr. MacVicar, and carried. 






'-.' 



REPORT OK QUEEN S OOLLECJE. 

The Report of Queen's University and College having been received at a former 
sederunt, and its further consideration deferred until the jt:dgment of the Assembly 
was had on the proposals affecting the constitution of the institution. 

It was now moved by Professor Dyde, seconded by Professor MoNaughton : 

That the report of Queen's University and College, submitted at a former sederunt, 
be adopted. 

The motion was agreed to. 

COMMITTEE ON CONFERENCE WITH TRUSTEES OF QUEEN's COLLEfiE. 

The follo'ving were appointed, in terms of the deliverance of the Assembly on 
the report of the Committee on the proposed changes in the Constitution of Queen's 
University, a committee to confer with that appomted by the Trustees of Queen's 
College, on the subject of those changes : 

Principal Caven, Convener; Drs. Thompson, R. Torrance, Warden, Somerville, 
J. Carmichael, R. N. Grant, Mr. W. J. Clark, Minist'>'-s ; and Messrs. James Bain, 
R. Davidson, J. R. McNeillie, A. Neilson, J. A. Macdonald, Geor'^e Keith, George 
Rutherford, W. B. McMurrich and the Hon. Thomas Bain, 



CHURCH ANI> MANSE BUILUINU FUNK. 



The Assembly called for the Report of the Church and Manse Building Fund« 
which was presented by Dr. Robertson, and to which he called attention in his 
address thereanent. 

[1051] 



W} 



42 ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

He concluded with moving the following resolution, seconded by Principal 
Grant. : — 

The General Assembly receives and adopts the report of the Church and Manse 
Building Board ; expresses its satisfaction with the large amount of work done during 
the year ; sympathises with the Board in its desire to have a fund more adequate to 
the work to be overtaken, and heartily commends the Fund anew to the generosity of 
members and adherents of the Church. 

Further, the General Assembly thanks the Chairman and Secretary-Treasurer 
for their valuable services in connection with this department of Church extension in 
the West. 

The resolution was adopted. 

PETITION re STUDENT MISSIONARY TO LABRADOR. 

There was pi^ ..inted and read a petition from the Presbytery of Halifax, askinc; 
the leave of the Assembly to authorize a student missionary to administer the 
Sacraments in the mission under the charge of the Presbytery, in Labrador, within the 
Province of Quebec. 

Mr. Thomas Fowler and Professor Falconer were heard in support of th© 
Petition. 

It was moved by Principal Grant, seconded by Dr. Scrimger : — 

That the request of the Presbytery of Halifax be complied with. 

The hour of adjournment having arrived, the further consideration of the subiect 
had to be deferred. 

Dr. Somerville's name was on motion, duly seconded, added to the Committee 
to deal with the report on the Probationerij' scheme. 

The Assembly adjourned, to meet in this place at a quarter to eight o'clock,, 
whereof public intimation having been given, this Sederunt was closed with the bene- 
diction by the Moderator. 



ELEVENTH SEDERUNT. 



At the .ame place, on the same day, at a ifuarier to eight o'clock in the eveni7i(j : 

The General Assembly met, as per adjournment, and was constituted with devo- 
tional exercises, Mr. A. M. Hamilton leading in prayer at the request of the Moderator. 
The minutes of last Sederunt were read and sustained. 






CHURCH LIFE AND WORK. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on Church Life and Work, 
which was presented by Mr. D. D. McLeod, Convener, and which, being printed and in 
the hands of members, he called attention to in his remarks thereanent. 

He moved that the report be received and its further consideration deferred till 
to-morrow morning. 

The motion was seconded and agreed to. 

[1052] 



OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IX CANADA. 



48 



SABBATH SCHOOLS. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on Sabbath Schools, which 
was presented by Mr. Neil, Convener, and being printed and in the hands of members, 
he contented himself with drawing attention to its prominent features. 

He moved that the Assembly receive the report, and consider its recommendations 
to-morrow morning. . 

Tlie motion was seconded and agreed to. 

^ YOUNG people's SOCIETIES. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Young People's Societies, which was 
presented by Mr. Alfred Gandier, Convener, and which, being printed and in the hands 
of members, he invoked the members to consider. 

He concluded with moving the reception of the report. 

The motion was seconded by Mr. W. S. McTavish, and agreed to. 

SYNOD UECORIKS. 

Tiie Assembly called for the Reports of the Committees appointed to examine 
Synod Records. Reports were presented by the Committees on the Records of the 
Synod of Montreal and Ottawa, the Synod of Manitoba and the North West Territories, 
and those of Toronto and Kingston, of British Columbia, and of the Maritime 
Provinces, bearing that the same are carefully and correctly kept, and recommending 
that they be attested accordingly. 

On motion of the Clerk, duly seconded, the report was received and adopted. 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY RECORDS. 

The Assembly called also for the Report of the Committee appointed to examin 
the Assembly Records, which was given in by Dr. Sedgwick, Convener. It bore that the 
Records were carefully and correctly kept, that the new form of the jtermanent Records 
promised to be more serviceable than the old manuscript one, and recommended that 
the same be attested. 

On motion, duly seconded, the report was received and adopted. 






i-. 



1: 



HYMNAL COMMITTEE. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Hymnal Committee, which was presented, 
in the absence of the Convener, by Dr. McLaren, and which, being printed and in the 
hands of members, he directed attention to in his remarks. The report was adopted. 

It being represented that it was important that action be at once taken by the New 
Hymnal Committee, and as a member of the Committee to strike Standing Committees 
assured the house that that Committee recommended the re-appointment of the Hymnal 
Committee of last year, Dr. McLaren .jvad. seconded by ]\Ir. R. Murray, that the 
Hymnal Committee of last year be re-appointed. 

The motion was agreed to. ' 

INVITATION TO THE ASSEMBLY. 

The Moderator read to the Assembly a communication he had received from the 
Honourable the Commissioner of Public Works and Mines, inviting the Moderator and 
members of the General Assembly to attend the graduating exercises of the Training 
School for Nurses, on Tuesday, June nineteenth, at half-past two o'clock. 

[1053] 



> Wi ■ 



44 ACTS AXI) PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH fJENERAL ASSEMBLY 

The Clerk was instructed to acknowledge receipt of the communication, and to reply 
that owing to press of business it would not be in the power of the Moderator and 
Assembly to accept the invitation. 

The Assembly adjourned to meet in this place to-morrow morning at ten o'clock ; 
whereof public intimation was given, and this Sederunt was closed with the benediction 
by the Moderator. 



TWELFTH SEDERUNT. 



At Halifax, and within St. yiattheio's Clmrch there, the nineteenth daij of June, One 
thousand nine hundred. 

The General Assembly met, as per adjournment, and was constituted with devo- 
tional exercises, Mr. John Grierson leading in prayer at the request of the Moderator. 
The minutes of last Sederunt were read and confirmed. 

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION IN SCHOOLS. 

The Assembly called for the report of the Committee on Religious Instruction in 
Schools, which was presented by Principal Caven, Convener, and which, being printed 
and in the hands of members, he invited attention to, especially sections two and three. 

He concluded with moving the following resolution, which was seconded by Dr. 
Thompson : — 

Receive and adopt the report, and instruct the committee, to be appointed to co- 
operate with similar committees and with representatives of other churches in securing 
for the Bible in the Public Education of the several Provinces the place to whi it is 
entitled. 

JUDICIAL COMMITTEE REPOUT. 

At this stage, being informed that the report of the Judicial Committee was ready 
for presentation, the Assembly called for the same, which was given in and read by Dr. 
A. B. MacKay, Convener, who, seconded by Mr. James Bain, moved its reception. 

Principal Grant moved, in amendment, seconded by Dr. Moore : — 

That the report be referred back to the Judicial Committee, with instructions to 
confer with the parties to the Reference and ascertain whether they are willing, in the 
interest of peace, to accept the proposed report or whether they claim their right to 
discuss the whole matter before the General Assembly. 

A vote being taken, the amendment prevailed over the motion, and was affirmed as 
a judgment of the house. 



ii! 



RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION IN SCHOOLS. 

The Assembly resumed consideration of the subject of Religious Instruction in 
Schools. 

The motion of Dr. Caven was adopted. 

It was then moved by Mr. J. A. Macdonald, seconded by Dr. Herridge, and 
agreed to : — 

■ [1054] 



' !■■ ; 



OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CflURCH I.V rAXADA. 



46 



That it be an instruction to the new committee to ;iim at securing that Biblical in- 
i^truction be given in all High Schoola, Cc^leges and Universities in the Dominion. 

SABBATH SCHOOLH: 

The Assembly resumed consideration of the report of the Committee on .Sabbath 
Schools. 

It was moved by Mr. W. VV. Peck, seconded by D. Torrance Eraser : — 

That the recommendations of the report be considered neriutim. 

The motion was adopted. 

It was then moved by Mr. Neil, seconded and agreed to : — 

That a special committee of Assembly be appointed to consider the condition of our 
Sabbath School work, and especially the matter of supervision and extension, and to 
report at a future sederunt of this Assembly. 

The following were appointed said Committee : — Dr. Moore, Coni'encr ; Dr. Mac- 
Vicar, Professor Falconer, Messrs. T. F. Fotheringham, Glassford, Cameron (of Kil- 
donan), Neil, Peck, Ministers ; and Messrs. Reid (Ottawa), Walter Paul, T. C. James, 
Professor Dyde, George Rutherford and D. Torrance Fraser, Elders. 






* ■. i 



niSTUKBANCE IN CHINA. 

It was moved by Dr. R. P. MacKay, seconded by Mr. M. G. Henry : — 

That in view of the disturbance in China and the danger to which our missionaries 
may be exposed, it be resolved to appoint a half hour for special prayer on their behalf. 

The motion was carried. 

The Assembly adjourned to meet in this place, this afternoon, at half-past two 
o'clock, whereof public intimation having been given, this Sederunt was closed with the 
benediction by the Moderator. 



THIRTEENTH SEDERUNT, 



At the same pldce, oti the smnedoy, at half -past two o'clock in the afternoon : 

The General Assembly met, as per adjournment, and was constituted with prayer 

by the Moderator. 

The minutes of the morning Sederunt were read, cc -rected and sustained. 

COM^IITTEE ox KELIfilOUS INSTRUCTION. 

The Moderator, as requested, named a committee on Instruction in Schools and 
Universities, as follows : — 

Principal Caven, Convener; Messrs. J. C. Herdman, W. L. Clay, D. G. McQueen, 
.Joseph Hogg, Dr. Wright, A. J. Mowatt, J. A. Carmichael, Drs. Thompson, Scrimger, 
McRae, Forrest, Falconer, (iordon, Herridge, MacVicar, Professors Dyde, Falconer, 
McNaughton, Baird, Ballantyne, Ministers; Dr. J. McDiarmid, J. R. McNeillie, 
J. K. Macdonald, A. C. Hutchison, R. Murray, W. W. ]\Iillar, .J. A. Macdonald, .lames 
Rodger, James Bain, and A. MacMurchy, Elders. 




SABBATH SCHOOLS. 

The Assembly resumed consideration of the report of the committee on Sabbath 



[1055] 



46 ACTS AND PllOCEEDlN'OS OP THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

Schools, and the several recommendations of the Committee, as set forth in the report in 
the Appendix, were adopted. 

It was moved by Mr. J. Neil, duly second d, and agreed to : 

That in view of the varied condition of our Sabbath School work in our Synod, and 
the necessity for consultation in regard to plans and methods of work, the travel- 
ling expenses of each Synod Convener, or his alternate, be paid to one meeting of the 
Assembly's Sabbath School Committee. 

Dr. McLaren moved, seconded by Mr. Walter Paul : — 

That the Moderator be requested to issue a Pastoral Letter to be read from the 
pulpits of the church, in which special attention shall be called to the training of the 
young and the important matters referred to in the recommendations of the Sabbath 
School report. 

The motion was adopted. 



I'ETITION re WILL OF MRS. JANE CARNOCHAN. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on the Petition of Yv. J. 
Landsborough and others, relating to the Will of the late Mrs. Jane Carnochan, which 
was given in and read by Dr. McLaren, Convener, who moved its reception and adop- 
tion. 

The motion was agreed to. The report is as follows : — 

The committee appointed to consider the petition of John Landsborough and other 
papers, bearing on the Will of the late Mrs. Jane Carnochan, of the Township of 
Tuckersmith, beg to report : — That after full and careful consideration of the papers 
aubniitted to them, and hearing of the statements of Mr. John Landsborough, they 
recommend to the Asseml)iy for adoption the following resolutions, viz : 

1. That Rev. Dr. Warden be directed to claim from the Executors of the Will of 
the late Mrs. Jane Carnochan, the full amount devised by her in her last Will to the 
schemes of the Church, and to grant them a discharge for the same. 

2. That Dr. Warden is directed to retain for the Church the sum of one thousand 
dollars ($1,000), should that amount be realized from the estate, and to divide the same 
among the schemes of the Church mentioned in the last Will of the said Mrs. Carnochan, 
in the proportion indicated in the said Will. 

3. That the balance of the moneys remaining after the sum of one thousand 
dollars has been divided among the schemes of the Church, shall be dealt with in the 
manner following, viz : 

(1) That a committee consisting of Rev. Dr. Warden, and Messrs. Hamilton Cassels 
and George Ke'th are hereby appointed to distribute the same. 

(2) That the said committee are authorized to enquire into the moral claim which 
David R. Landsborough makes to the sum of four hundred dollars ($400), and should 
they deem that he has a moral right to th sane, or any portion thereof, they may pay 
to him such amount as they may consider quitable, and then distribute the balance 
remaining among the nearest of kin of the late Mrs. Carnochan, in the manner which 
they consider most convenient. 



I, 



YOUNG PEOPLE S SOCIETIES. 



The Assembly resumed consideration of the report of the committee on Young 
People's Societies. 

Mr. Alfred Gandier moved th following resolutions : — 



[1056] 



OF THE I'llESBYTERIAM CIIUHCH IN CANADA. 



47 



1. The Ueneral Assembly exprHSseb gnititioition at the fervent loyalty and active 
Christian life of so many young people within the various congregations, and gratefully 
acknowledges the continued and increasing liberality of the Young People's Societies to 
the great mission schemes of the Church. 

2. The General Assembly regrets the reported decrease in membership and the 
apparent decline of interest in Young People's meetings and Young People's work in 
many sections of the Church. The Assembly believes that the Society of Christian 
Endeavor and kindred organizations have been of the greatest value to the young people, 
in laying upon them a sensa of personal responsibility for their own share in the work 
and worship of the Church, and in giving them a chance to learn the signiticance and 
methods of Church work by actually doing such work. The Assembly would, therefore, 
urge upon sessions the necessity of keeping in close sympathy with societies that are 
now strong and aggressive, of strengthening the things that remain and are ready to die, 
in societies where the first zeal has burned low, and of organizing Societies in congrega- 
tions and stations where none exist. 

3. In view of complaints from many (juarters that sessions do not take the interest 
they should in the young people and their work, the Assembly would specially request 
sessions to encourage the young people by frequent presence at their meetings, to stim- 
ulate and guide their giving, and to help them in preparing interesting programmes for 
the evenings when the special topics are taken up. 

4. While the Assembly would recommend such changes and adaptations in Young 
Peoples' Societies as may be necessary to give variety and meet present conditions in 
the different congregations, it is convinced that any organization which is not distinc- 
tively religious and Christian in its aim, and which does not call the young people to 
service and testimony for Jesus Christ, cannot be of sufficient interest to hold the 
young people together permanently, or be of real value to a congregation. 

The motion was seconded and agreed to. 



I:i 



•i 



REPORT OF JUDICIAL COMMITTEE. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Judicial Committee to whom had been 
remitted the Referenoe from the Presbytery of Indore, .vhich had been re-committed at 
a former sederunt. The report was given in and read by Dr. A. B. MacKay, who 
ntimated that the finding of the Committee had been communicated to Mr. F. H. 
Russell, representing the Presbytery of Indore, and Mr. J. Wilkie, f^r himself, and 
that they both signified acquiescence in the same. Dr. MacKay moved che reception 
and adoption of the report. The motion was seconded by Mr. James Bain and agreed 
to. The finding is as follows : — 

Deliverance of the Judicial Committee on the References from the Presbytery of 
Indore. 

Resolved : — That the Reference from the Presbytery of Indore be sustained. That 
it is regretted that in his address before the General Assembly of last year, Mr. Wilkie 
in vindicating himself from charges which he regarded as made against him, should 
have made statements reflecting upon his brethren of the Presbytery of Indore, some of 
which he has now withdrawn as being made with imperfect information. The Com- 
mittee does not find that Mr. Wilkie intended to deceive by any of these statements, 
though in some of them he was not sufficiently careful to verify the facts on which his 
statemen'^s rested. 

The College and High School shall, in the meantime, remain under the direct care 
of the Foreign Mission Committee, according to the decision of last Assembly. 



[1057] 



48 ACTS ANJ* I'ROCEEDIXOS OF THE TWENTV-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

Tim (iunural AsHeiiibly expects that Mr, Wilkie, m in duty bound, will attend the 
ineutingH of hia Prenbytery and co-operate with his brethren in the ^eneral work of the 
niission. 

The General AHseml)ly expectH that all the brethren in the niiHHion, deeply im- 
pressed with the importance of working in harmony, au representatives of the Church 
of Christ and its Divine Head, iit the presence of those who know not the Christian 
religion, will earnestly study the things which make for peace, and thus encourage and 
support one another in their arduous labours. 

The report beini; adopted, Principal Caven, at the request of the Assombiy, led in 
a prayer of thanksgiving. 



ei u 



KEl'OKT ON AID.S FOK SOCIAL WORSHIl'. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on Aids for Social Worship, 
which was presented by Dr. Herridge, Ounvenet; and which, being printed and in the 
hands of members, he called attention to in his remarks thereanent. 

Dr. Robertson moved, seconded by Dr. Moore : 

That the report be received, and that in view of the incomplete returns from 
Presbyteries, the Committee be continued and instructed to ascertain the mind of the 
Church mure fully in regard to the use of such a manual for the purposes contemplated. 

It was moved by Dr. Scrimger, seconded by Dr. Campbell (Clerk) : — 

That it be an instruction to the Commit'tee to eliminate the responsive portion of 
the complete service and the litany from the book before sending it to I'resbyteries for 
their opinion. 

The hour of adjournment having arrived, the further consideration of the motion 
had to be deferred. 

The Assembly adjourned, to meet in this place at a quarter to eight o'clock this 
evening, whereof public intimation having been given, this Sederunt was closed with 
the benediction by the Moderator. 



FOURTEENTH SEDERUNT. 

At the same place, on the same day, at a (/Harter to eight o'clock in the eveiiing : 

The General Assembly met, as per adjournment, and was constituted with devo- 
tional exercises. Dr. Carmichael leading in prayer at the request of the Moderator. 
The Minutes of last Sederunt were read and confirmed. 

AUGMENTATION FUND, WESTERN SECTION. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Augmentation Fund'Committeo, Western 
Section, which was presented by Dr. Lyle, and which, being printed and in the hands of 
members, he contented himself with calling attention to. He concluded with moving, 
seconded by Dr. Herridge, the reception and adoption of the report. 

The motion was agreed to. 

AUGMENTATION FUND, EASTERN SECTION. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Augmentation Funa Committee, Eastern 

[1(»58] 



r I' 



OP THE PKESUYTKJUAN CHrKCII IV CANADA. 



49 



Bectiuti, which whb preHeiitud l)y Mr. K. Smith, Conri-ufi; and w. h, being printed and 
in the hands of iiienihe.a, he called attention to in his ruinarks thereanent. 

Mr. .lames McLean moved, seconded by Mr. D. H. MacLeod : — 

The (ieneral AoHembly receives and adopts the report of the Augmentation Com- 
mittee, Eastern .Section. It exprosseH gratitude to (>od for manifold tokens of His 
favour, contirmH t))« action of the Committee in making th. pecial grants referred to 
therein, and gives permiNsion to deal with new applications for aid from the Augmenta- 
tion F^und. 

The Oeneral Assembly rejoices that the Committee was able to pay the promised 
grants in full, reminds I'resbytories of the necessity of exercising continual vigilance 
over their aid-receiving congregations, and commends anew this important scheme of the 
Church to the sympathy and liberality of our people. 

The motion was carried. 

PRAVKK hUK THE MISSIONARIES IN CHINA. 

As agreed upon at a former sederunt, the Assembly engaged in a season of supplica- 
tion for the safety and upholding of our missionaries in China and their converts, in the 
present disturbed state of that country, Dr. R. P. Mac Kay and Messrs. J. B. MuUan 
and James Rodger leading in prayer at the reiiuest of the Moderator. 

REI'OKT ON PBKNCH RVANOELI/ATION. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Board of French P^vangelization, which 
was presented by the Chairman, Principal MacVicar, and which, being printed and in 
the hands of members, he called attention to in his remarks thereanent. 

He concluded with moving the following resolution : — 

Receive and adopt the report, express gratitude for the measure of success which 
attended the services of the Missionaries of the Board during the past year, and com- 
mend the work to the prayerful and liberal support of the Church. 

Till motion was seconded by Mr. A. J. Mowatt. 

ADDRES.SKS KV MESSRS. DUCLOS AND AMARON. 

Before putting the motion, the Moderator requested Mr. J. E. Ducloa, B.A., of 
Valleyfield, and Dr. Amaron, of St. John's Church, Montreal, to address the Assembly 
regarding the work carried on by the Board. 

The resolution w *8 adopted. 

MR. M'CCROV's acceptance OK THE AdENCY. 

Dr. Falconer reported on behalf of the Committee appointed to wait upon Mr. E. A. 
McCurdy to infor-n him of his election to the position of Agent of the Church, Eastern 
Section, that the Committee had met with Mr. McCurdy and communicated to him the 
Assembly's action, and that Mr. McCurdy had signified his acceptance of the position. 
Mr. McCurdy, being present, thanked the Assembly for the mark of confidence reposed 
in him, and promised to do his best to justify such confidence. 

Dr. Falnner, having intimated that urgent matters were calling him home, re- 
quested leave of absence from the Assembly, and asked that some one else should be 
appointed to present the report of the Committee to strike standing committees, which 
was ready. 



[1059] 



ji ■'. 



r ■ ' ' 


1 


i 








I; 



'• 



'■' i 



60 ACTS AND PIIOCKKUINNIS OF TIIK TWKNTY-.SIXTII (lENEKAI. ASSEMULY 

The AHAembly grnnted the leave re<|ue8ted, tuul appointed Mr. .1. A. Anderaun to 
present the report of the Comniitteu to atrike atanding cununittoea. 

The Aasenibly adjourned to meet in this place to-morruw ni'^rning at ten o'clock ; 
whereof public intimation having been given, thin Sederunt was chmed with the benedic- 
tion by the Moderator. 



FIFTEENTH SEDERUNT. 

At Halifax, and within St. Matthew's Chnnh tliere, the ticentieth day of June, One 
Ihvnaand nine hundred, at ten o'clock in the forenoon: 

The General Aaaembly met, as per adjournment, and was constituted with devotional 
exercises, Dr. McLaren leading in prayer, at the request of the Moderator. 
The minutes of last Sederunt were read and approved. 

COMMITTEE ON BILLS AND OVERTURES. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on Bills and Overtures, 
which was given in and read by Mr. J. Faniuharson. It embraced the items of 
business still remaining to be attended to, and recommended that the report of the 
Committee to strike Standing Committees be first taken up. On motion, duly seconued, 
the report was received and adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO STRIKE 8TANDINO COMMITTEES. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee to Strike Standing Com- 
mitteeB, which was given in and read by Mr. J. A. Anderson, acting Convener, who 
moved its reception and the consideration of its recommendations. The motion was 
seconded and agreed to. 

The recommendations of the Committee regarding all the Standing Committees and 
Boards of the Church were considered, amended and adopted, except those relating to 
the French Board, Sabbath Schools and Young Peoples' Societies. The recommenda- 
tions regarding these three were remitted for further consideration. 

COMMITTEE ON OVERTURES re HOME MISSIONS. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee to whom were referred the 
overtures from the Synod of British Columbia and the presbytery of Algoma, as to the 
supply of the Home Mission fields, and the recommendation of the Home Mission 
Committee on the same subject, which was given in and read by Dr. Campbell (Perth), 
Convener, who moved its reception and the consideration of its various items seriatim. 

On motion, duly seconded, tho first recommendation of the Committee was adopted. 

A motion to adopt the second recommendation of the Committee was under 
discussion when the hour of adjournment arrived, and its further consideration had to 
be deferred. 

The Assembly adjourned to meet in this place, this afternoon, at half-past two 
o'clock, whereof public intimation having been given, this Sederunt was closed with 
the benediction by the Moderator. 



[1060] 



i'l 



OK IMK I'KKSIIVTKKIAN CIUUUH IN CANADA. 



ftl 



SIXTKKNTH SKUKUrNT, 



At thf nniHH pldff, iiti Ihf .iinnf iliii/, itl litilf-fMiHf tiro n'floil: in the afternoim : 

Tliu AHaeiiil)l> .nut, hs per Mcljouriiiuuiit, and wan constituted with devutional 

exurciHua, Dr. R. Turraiice leading in prayer at the rei|UUHt of tiio Moderator. 
The minutes of last Sederunt were read and cunKrnied. 



, 



C'OMMITTKK TO MTHIKK HTANni.NO COM.MITTKK8. 

The AflHembly called for the report of the Committee to strike >Standin({ConimitteeH, 
to whom it was remitted to ctmsider further the nominations of the French Hoard and 
the Committee on Hahbath Schools and Young Peuple'H Hocieties, which was given in by 
Mr. .1. A. Anderson, lu-tinij Ciinri-m-r, who moved the reception of the same and the 
cunnideration of itn recommendatioiiH nfriittitn. The motion was seconded and agreed 
to. The draft report relating to these three was amended and adopted. 

The report of the Committee as a whole was then adopted, on motion of Mr. Ander- 
son, duly seconded. 

I. Pkk.suvtkrun Collkok, H.m.ika.v. 

1. JiiKtnl (if Munniji^mi'tit. 

Dr. Sedgwick, (jhnirumn ; Principal Pollok, Dr. Currie, Dr. Gordon, Prof. Fal- 
coner, Dr. John McMillan, Dr. Forrest, Messrs. .las. S. Carruthers, D. Fraser, \. H. 
Campbell, E. D. Millar, Willard McDonald, .lames McLean, A. McLean Sinclair, T. 
Stewart, H. K. McLean, A. Gandier, J. M. Fisher, AnJorHon Rogers, A. P». Dickie, 
A. McMillan, .F. F. Forbesi, George Miller, A. S. Morton, T. Cumming, Ministers : 
and A. Kennedy, Dr. Stewart, VV. H. Chase, .1. D. McGregor, Dr. .lames Walker, R. 
Murray, R. liaxter, Judge Forbes, Hon. Senator McKeen, and Geori^e Mitchell, M.P.P. ; 
the Agent of the Church, and the members of the Fiiiance Committee, Eastern Section, 
ex-ojfirio. 

2. Senate. 

Principal Pollok, Cliditimni ; the Professors of the College; Dr. Forrest, Dr. 
Black, Messrs. .1. M. Robinson, C. McKiniion, J. D. McKay, T. Fowler, R. Laing, 
James Carruthers. C. Munro, \V. 1'. Archilwild, J. B. McLean, H. Dickie, T. Stewart, 
T. F. Fotfieringham, and J. S. Sutherland, Ministers; and Prof. Macdoiiald, Prof. 
Wnlter Murray, Dr. A. H. McKay and 11. Murray. 



h i 






n. PUKSBVTEIUAN CoVLFME, MONTREAL. 

1. Bourd iif Miinngement. 

Mr. D. Morrice, ClKtirnum; Principal MacVicar, Dr. J. Scrimger, Dr. .Jas. Ross, 
Dr. John Campbell, Dr. A. B. Mackay, Dr. Warden, Dr. Barclay ; I\Ie8»r.s. Robert 
Gamble, J. R. McLeod, J. Hastie, D. W. Morison, J. Fleck, Dr. W. T. Herndge, D. 
Currie, T. W. Winfield, and G. Whillans, Ministers; and .fas. Ross (Stanley St.), Lord 
Sirathcona and Mount Royal, Messrs. A. C. Hutchison, Jas. Robertson, D. T. F'-aser, 
D. Robertson, W. Yuile, D. Munro, C. MacArthur, C. J. Fleet, W. Paul, M. Hutchi- 
son, A. S. Ewing, Charles Byrd, Wm. Drysdale, Geo. Hyde, Jas. Davidson (Sher- 
brooke), and Dr. Berwick. 

[1061] 



52 ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 












i I 






2. Senate, 

Princi;)al Mac Vicar, Chairman ; the Profeaaors and Lecturers of the College, Dr. 
A. B. MacKay, Dr. R. Campbell, Dr. D. Paterson, Dr. Barclay, Mesars. N. A. Mc- 
Leod, A. .1. Mowatt, D. Tait, W. D. Reid, John McLeod^ P. H. Hutchinson, Dr. Bayne, 
D. TTutchison, C. B. Ross, S. J. Taylor, J. A. McKenzie, H. Cameron ; Dr. J. F. Mc- 
Laren, A. Russell, and .J. R. Dobson, representing the Alumni, Ministers; and Principal 
Peterson, Prof, Murray, Dr. Kelly, Messrs. D. Morrice, and Prof. Arch. McGoun. 

III. MoKRiN College, Quebec. 

Governors appointed by the General Assembly: — Messrs. E. Scott and J. R. Mc- 
Leod. 

IV. Queen's College. 

Bursary and Scholarship Committee. 

Mr. J. Mclatyre, Q. C, Convener; Principal Grant, Mesars. W. W. Peck, John 
Mackie, and J. L', Boyd, Mmidem ; and Messrs. George Gillies, Judge MacTavish and 
G. N. Northrup. 

V. Knox CoLLE(iE. 

1. Board of Munngement. 

Mr. W. Mortimer Clark, Chairman ; Principal Caven, Dr. McLaren, Dr. Warden, 
Dr. Battisby, R. VV. Dickie, Dr. Fletcher, Dr. Parsons, Dr. R. N. Grant, Dr. Mungo 
Fraaer, R. S. G. Anderson, R. G. Davey, Alex. McMillan, G. R. Fasken, J. Neil, Dr. 
R. Johnston, S. H. Eastman, J. VV. Rae, W. J. Clark, H. R Home, E. Cockburn, R. 
J. M. Glassford, Dr. A. Black, Dr. E. F. Torrance, A. McGillivray, Prof. Ballantyne, 
Ministers; and Hon. J. M. Gibson, Messrs. .J. K. McDonald, Jas. Bain, D. D. Wil- 
son, A. I. McKenzie, R. Kilgour, J. Gowans, G. C. Robb, and J. A. Macdonald, 
Elders. 

2. Semite. 

Principal Caven, Chninaan ; the l*-ofesaors and Lecturers of the College, Dr. 
McMuUen, Dr. Abraham, Dr. Somerville, Dr. R. Torrance, Dr. Gray, Dr. Wardrope, 
Dr. McCurdy, Dr. James Carmichael, Dr. INIilligan, Messrs. E. W. MacKay, J. S, 
Scott, M. MacGregor, W. Fanjuharson, J. A. Turnbull, R. W. Ross, G. Fletcher, 
W. G. Wallace, J. McD. Duncan, J. W. McMillan, R. Haddow, D. D. McLeod, W. 
Frizzell, J. H. Ratclifle, A. McMillan, R. Martin, J. Crawford, Dr. R. P. MacKay ; W. 
G. Hanna, R. C. Tibb, and John McNair. representing the Alunmi, Ministers; and Sir 
T. W. Taylor, Messrs. A. McMurchy, VV. Mortimer Clark, ^Geo. Dickson, J. A. Paterson, 
D. Fotheringham, and Hon. G. W. Ross, Elders. 



i f % 



VI. Manitoiia College. 

Board of Manacjement. 

Mr. Colin H. Campbell, Chdirman ; Prin. Patrick, Prof. Hart, Dr. Kilpatrick, Dr. 
Bryce, Dr. Duval, Dr. Robertson, Prof. Baird, Jos. Hogg, Dr. P. Wright, J. Far()u- 
haraon, C. B. Pitblado, E. D. McLaren, Jas. C. Herdman, John Hogg, R. G. McBeth, 
C. W. Gordon, and J. H. Cameron, Ministers ; and Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal, 

[10ii2] 



III 



;!V' » 



OF THE PUESBYTEKIAN CHL'IICH IN CANADA. 



53 



Sir Thoi>:'>s W. Taylor, Messrs. J. C. Saul, J. Sutherland, A. Dawson, James Fisher, 
M.P., Alex. McDonald, K. MacKenzie (Winnipeg), and J. C. MacLaren. 

VII. Home Missions. 

1. Western Section. 

Dr. Warden, Concener ; Prof. J. Ross, J. R. Bell, A. T. Love, Dr. R. Tor- 
rance, Dr. R. Campbell (Perth), Dr. Somerville, Dr. McMuIlen, Dr. Hamilton, Dr. Find- 
lay, Dr. J. R. Battisby, Dr. J. F. McLaren, Dr. Robertson (Superintendent), Dr. W. D. 
Armstrong, S. Childerhose, Dr. Jas. Stuart, A. Givan, M. W. MacLean, R. Moodie, 
J. W. McMillan, A. Gilray, J. H. Ratcliffe, J. Far([uhar8on, Dr. .1. L. Murray, A. 
Tolmie, A. Henderson, J. Rennie, J. M. AuU, E. D. MacLaren, .1. A. McKeen, A. A. 
Scott, J. G. Potter, J. Neil, N. McPherson, R. E. Knowles, H. Currie, and J. A. 
Anderson, Ministers; and Messrs. R. Kilgour, John Penman, Hon. E. H. Bronson, 
Lieut.-Col. McCrae, George Rutherford and S. Russell, M.P.P. 

2. Eastern i-'edion. 

Mr. Thos. Stewart, Conrener ; Messrs. E. A. McCurdy, G. S. Carson, T. Fowler, G. 
Miller, J. R. Munro, R. Strathie, D. MacDonald, T. C. Jack, J. M. Robins jn, J. A. 
Forbes, J. W. Crawford, Jameu Ross, .1. A. McLean, D. B. McLeod, D. Henderson, 
David Wright, D. J. Eraser, H. R. Grant, Clarence .McKinnon, A. B. Dickie, A. 
Robertson, and G. MacMillan, Ministers; and Messrs. John Willett, R. Baxter, John 
McDougall, Harvey Graham, H. A. White, T. H. Austen and J. K. Munnis. 

VIII. Al'OME.NTATION. 

1. Western Section. 

Dr. Lyle, Concener; Dr. Warden, Dr. Kellock, Alex. Henderson, John Johnston, 
John Hay, Dr. Robertson, Dr. Campbell (Perth), Dr. Somerville, Messrs. .1 C. 
Tolmie, Dr. Findlay, Dr. A. Black, Dr. W. T. Herridge, J. W. McMillan, \\'. J. Clark, 
J. Farquharson, W. G. Wallace, E. D. McLaren, M. MacGillivray, J. A. Grant, Minis- 
ters; and Messrs. D. Morrice, .Joseph Henderson, A. T. Crombie, and J. A. Macdonald. 

2. Eastern Sectiim. 

Mr. E. Smith, Concener; Messrs. J. W. Falconer, G. L. (iordon, James Sinclair, .J. 
M. McLeod, W. M. Tuifts, J. S. Sutherland, E. M. Dill, Dr. J. S- Black, D. McOdrum, 

E. S. Bayne, D. MacGillivray, J. A. Cairns, D. McGregor, W.H. Spencer, F.W.Murray, 

F. S. Ccffin, W. H. Smith and Henry Dickie, Ministers; and Messrs. J. D. Mac- 
Gregor, T. '"•■ Jam. s, H. W. Cameron, Dr. W. S. Morrison, and W. C. VVhittaker. 

IX. FoREKiN Mission Committkk. 

Dr. Moore and Dr. Falconer, Joint Conveners. 

1. Western Dicision. 

Dr. Moore, Concener; Dr. MacLaren, Dr. Warden, Dr. Milligan, Prof. Baird, 
W. A. J. Martin, Dr. Thompson, Principal MacVicar, Dr. .1. B. Eraser, Dr. MacTavish, 
A. J. Mo watt, J. McP. Scott, Dugald Currie, Dr. R. Johnston, R. J. M. Glass- 
ford, and Dr. R. P. McKay, Ministers; Messrs. J. R. McNeillie, A. Jeffrey, .\. 
Fairbairn, D. MacKenzie, D. D. Wilson and Hamilton Cassels. 












'H/' 



[1003] 



54 ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 






t.:is 



':* :';:i'. 









2. Eastern Division. 

Dr. A. Falconer, Co)ivener ; MeBsrs. L. G. MacNeill, D. MacGreijar, A. F. Carr, 
Edwin Smith, M. G. Henry, E. A. McCurdy, Alfred Gandier, J. A. McGlashen, and 
E. D. Millar, Ministers ; and Messrs. T. C. James, J. D. McKay, L. W. Johnston and 
Prof. W. C. Murray. 

X. French EvArajELizATioN. 

Principal MacVicar, Guiirman ; Dr. Scrimger, Dr. R. Campbell (Montreal), Dr. 
Coussirat, Prof. Campbell, Dr. Amaron, Dr. S. Lyle, Dr. A. B. McKay, Messrs. M. 
H. Scott, R. P. Duclos, J. R. McLeod, D. McLaren, J. R. Dobson, Jas. Fleck, G. C. 
Heine, G. Munro, F. M. Dewey, J. A. Anderson, D. Tait, A. J. Mowatt, Jos. 
Morrin, A. A. Scott, J. Hastie, Janies Ross (St. John), W. Frizzell, S. J. Taylor, J. L. 
George, J. M. Whitelaw, J. F. MacFarland and J. E. Duclos, Ministers ; and Hon. E. 
H. Bronson, A. C. Hutchison, D. Morrice, Walter Paul, George Hay, John Herdfc, 
Paul Payan, A. G. Farrell, Jas. Ramsay, W. Drysdale, pr. Kelly, and R. Brodie (Que- 
bec). 

XI. Distribution of Probationers. 

Dr. R. Torrance, Convener ; Messrs. Neil McPherson, Dr. Abraham, James A. Grant 
and A. Mc Williams, Ministers; and George Rutherford, Elder. 

XII. Chukch Life and Work 

Mr. D. D. McLeod, Convener; the Conveners of Synods' Committees, Messrs. G. S. 
Carson, Wm. Robertson, J. A. Mackenzie, D. Stiles Eraser, Dr. McTavish, Dr. J. S. 
Black, Dr. E. W. Waits, Dr. P. Wrigl ^, J. D. xMcKay, R. Gumming, Dr. A. A. Mac- 
Kenzie, Dr. A. B. McKay, Dr. MacNish, Dr. W. A. McKay, J. McD Duncan, J. E. 
Munro, D. G McQueen, C. S. Lord, Jas. Rollins, K. McLennan (Levis), J. W. Muir- 
head, John Mclnnes, Sam'l Acheson, H. D. Lsitch, M. C. Cameron, W. L. H. Rowand, 
James Murray, D. McG. Gandier, James Wilson, E. A. Mackenzie, A. J. McLeod, C. B. 
Pitblado, G. Munro, J. Mackie, J. C. Herdman, and Dr J. A. Morison, Ministers; 
and Messrs. R. Murray, G. M. Roger, A. Godall, John Hardie, W. AdaniK' m, Dr. 
Beaton, N. F. McNaughton, J. Charlton, M.P., Dr. MucDonald (Wingham), John 
Patterson (Winnipeg), Dr. Wallace, J. H. Cayford, A. F. Wood, J. B. Mitchell, and 
A. Henderson. 

XIIT. Sabbath Schools. 

Mr. John Neil, Cuni'ener ; the Conveners of the Sabbath School Committees in the 
several Synods and Presbyteries, Prof. Falconer, R. D. Eraser, J. G. Stuart, T. F. 
Fotheringham, J. MacEwan, Dr. R. H. Abraham, W. Farquharson, Jos. Hogg, J. A. 
Brown. W. L. Clay and Daniel Strachan, Ministers; and Messrs. J. R. Reid (Ottaw^a), 
A. S. McGregor (London), J js. Turnbull (Toronto), W. H. Irwin (Brandon), J. A. Pater- 
son, A. W. Wright (Gait), '"^ T. Kennedy (Halifax), John Winchester (Parkdale), W. 
Yellowlees and J. B. Halkett, 

XIV. Ministers' Widows' and Orphans' Fund. 
(Late Canada Presbyterian Church.) 
Mr. Joseph Henderson, Convener ; Dr. Warden, Messrs. R. Gamble, A. McGillivray, 

[1064] 



I ) I 



' t 
( 



OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CAXAOA. 



55 



J. G. Potter, W. Amos, D. R. Drummond, A. L. Geggie, J, L. George, Ministers; and 
Messrs. J. L. Blaikie, J. Harvie, W. Gordon, Andrew Jeffrey, W. Galbraith, G. F. 
Burns, Joseph Nok-wioh and D. Ormiston. 

Eastern Section. 

Mr. Laing, Convener; Dr. T. Sedgwick, Dr. A. McLean, A. MacLean Sinclair, J. 
McLean, James S. Carruthers, A. F. Thompson, J. VV. Falconer, Ministers; and 
Messrs. R. Baxter, G. Mitchell, Dr. A. H. McKay and J. D. MacGregor. 

XV. Aged and Infirm Ministees' Fukd. 

1. Westerti Section. 

Mr. J. K. McDonald, Convener ; Dr. Warden, Dr. W. D. Armstrong, Dr. Dickson, 
Messrs. A. H. Scott, R. Laird, Arch. Graham, A. Gilray, Dr. W. G. Jordan, Dr. 
McCrae, E. A. Henry, H. McQuarrie, Dr. Fletcher, G. Mc Arthur, F. McCuaig, S. 
Carruthers, Stuart Acheson and A. McLean, Ministers ; and Wm. R. Leckie, Lord 
Strathcona and Mount Royal, Dr. Wallace, Robert Lawrie, J. A. Mather, H. J. John- 
ston, John A. Paterson, Wm. Adamson, J. R. Reid, John Harvey, Ceo. Rutherford, 
R. Atkinson and Alex. Nairn. 

2. Eastern Section. 

Mr. Anderson Rogers, Convener; Messrs. E. B. Rankin, John Murray, J. A. 
McKenzie, Jas. Rosborough, A. B. Dickie, Geo. Fisher, J. R. Coffin, A. MacLean 
Sinclair, J. Burgess, C. Munro, W. P. Archibald, G. Leek, James Sinclair, D. Mac- 
Dougall, Dr. PoUok and J. F. Dustan, Ministers ; and D. MacDonald, Sheriff Archibald, 
Owen Cameron, Alex. Henderson and Judge Forbes. 

XVI. Finance. 

1. Western Section. 

Mr. Geo. Keith, Conxner ; Dr. Warden, Messrs. John Gowans, Wm. Wilson, G. T. 
Fergusson, J. L. Blaikie, George Rutherford (Hamilton), D. Morrice, C. MacArthur, 
and A. T. Crombie. 

2. Eastern Section. 

Mr. J. C. MacKintosh, Convener; Messrs. David Blackwood, E. A. McCurdy, J. 
W. Carraichael, J. F. Stairs, Geo. Cunningham, Hugh MacKenzie, Jas. Kennedy. 

XVII. Statistics. 

Dr. R. Torrance, Convener; Messrs. G. R. Fasken, A. M. Hamilton, W. A. J. 
Martin, Dr. Dickson, R. Wm. Ross, Ministers; Messrs. Major G. B. Hood and Lieut.- 
Col. Higginbotham, and the church agents, Toronto and Halifax. 

XVIII. Protection of Church Property. 

Hon. Justice MacLennan, Convener; Dr. Warden, Prof. Donald Ro^8,Dr. R. Camp- 
bell (Montreal), Dr. Pollok, Dr. R. Torrance, Prof. Hart, Dr. J. Campbell (Victoria) 
and Dr. Robertson, Ministers; and Hon. D. Laird, Messrs. J. L. Morris, Q.C., G. M. 
Macdonnell, Q.C., J. Maclntyre, Q.C., Sir Thomas W, Taylor, VV. B. MacMurrich, 
Hamilton Cassels, Hon. D. C. Fraser, Judge Forbes, Thornton Fell, F. H. Chrysler, 

[1065] 






m 4 



56 ACTS AND I'UOCKEDINGS OK THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

Q.C., W. B. Ross, Q.C., J. A. MacKinnon, James Muir, Q.C., Colin Campbell, Judge 
Stevens, Judge McKenzie (Sarnia), John A. Paterson, Major Walker, Judge Creasor, 
W. M. Clark, Q.C., Hon. Justice Sedgwick, Thomas Caswell, Judge Truenian, A. G. 
Browning, D. B. McLennan, Q.C., and D. McCormick, Q.C. 

XIX. Church anu Manse Building Board. 

Mr. J. B. MacLareii, Chairm<in ; Dr. Robertson, Dr. Duval, Prof. Baird, Messrs. 
D. Mc(i. Gandier, W. L. Clay, Joseph Hogg, R. G. 3IacBeth, J. C. Herdman, James 
Farquharson, R'^. C. Rumball, J. A. Carmichael, C. W. Gordon, and D. G. McQueen, 
Ministers ; and Sir Thomas W. Taylor, Messrs. Alex. Macdonald, C. H. Campbell, and 
Jahn Patterson. 

XX. Hymnal Committek. 

Dr. Gregg, Convener; Dr. Macrae (Quebec), Dr. D. M. Gordon, Dr. MacLaron, 
Dr. D. L. McCrae, Dr. Scrimger, Dr. J. Somerville, Dr. James, Dr. VV. D. Armstrong, 
Dr. J. B. Fraser, Messrs. J. A. Macdonald, W. J. Dey, J. Thompson (Ayr), Dr. Her- 
ridgo, G. C. Heine, James Anderson, J. B. Mullan, Alex. Henderson, R. S. G. Anderson, 
M. MacGillivray, Alexander MacMillan, and G. Stuart, Ministers ; and Messrs. W. B. 
MacMurrich, R. A. Becket, W. B. Geikie, M.D., John H. Thom, .Joseph Henderson, 
R. Murray, James Gibson, James Johnson (Hamilton), John Henderson (Montreal), 
and Prof. S. W. Dyde ; the members in Toronto to be an Executive Co.nmittee. 

XXI. Presbyterian Record. 

Dr. R. H. Warden, Coni-ener ; Editor of Record, Dr. R. Campbell (Montreal), 
Dr. J. S. Black, Prof. Scrimger, D.D., Prof. James Ross, D.D., Messrs. W. D. Reid, 
Jrimes Fleck, C. B. iloss, and Walter Paul. 






XXII. YouN<i People's Societies. 

Mr. A. Gandier, Convener; the Conveners of Synod and Presbytery Committees 
J. McP. Scott, J. A. Brown, A. D. McDonald (P. E. I.), W. R. Mcintosh, W. S. Mc 
Tavish, G. D. Ireland, W. Shearer, Alex. Laird, R. D. Fraser, J. P. Falconer, N. H 
Russell, C. McKillop, R. Haddow, J. A. Carmichael, J. S. Conning, W. M. Rochester, 
Dr. J. Campbell, R. M. Hamilton, G. C. Pidgeon, A. D. Archibald, J. S. Henderson 
D. Munro, D. R. Drummond, R. Patterson, A. Mc Williams, C. T. Tough, G. P. Duncan 
T. J. Thomson (Belleville), F. M. Dewey, Jno. McLeod, J H. Mac Vicar, J. S 
Davidson, Ministers; and Messrs. John S. Smith, Prof. J. F. McCurdy, G. A. McGilli 
vrny, I. Pitblado, J. B. McKilligan, T. M. Henderson, (i. Tower Ferguson, F. Reid, 
J. D. Higginbotham, J. B. Halkett and J. P. Parlass, 

XXIII. Sabbath School Pjblications. 

Dr. R. H. Warden, Convener; Dr. Fletcher, Dr. John Thompson, Dr. MacTavish, 
Messrs. J as. Murray, R. D. Fraser, John Neil, J. A. Brown, G. T. Fergusson, E. Scott, 
Jas. Bain, jr., and Hamilton 'Cassels. 



XXIV. Committee on Sabbath Observance and Legislation. ' 

Mr. D. R. Drummond, Convener; Principal Caven, Messrs. J. G. Shearer, John 
Crawford, Dr. Johnston, D. D. MacLeod, Principal Grant, P^of. Dyde, Principal 

[1066] 



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OK THE PRKSBYTKUIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



57 



MacVicar, D. M. Ramsay, J. J. Elliott, Qeo. MacArthur, Jaa. Hamilton, D. .1. Fraser, 
D. Campbell (Victoria), E. D. MacLaren, R. G. McBeth, G. R. Maxwell, M.P., .1. M. 
Douglas, M.P., D. Tait, Principal Pollok, W. H. L. Rowand, W. L. Clay, C. W. 
(Jordon, T. F. Fotheringh.m, Minist'Ts ; Messrs. John Charlton, M.P., Waltar Paul, 
Alex. Bartlett, D. C. Eraser, M.P., John Patterson, J. K. Macdonald, E. H. Broii.son, 
R. H. Myers, M.L.A., VV. T. Kennedy, Judge Creasor, S. W. Russell, M.P., J. A. 
Paterson, VVm. Clark (Cardinal), Senator Vidal. 

It is recommended that the different local sections of the Committee meet for 
conference at the call of the following Sub-Conveners, viz .—Maritime Provinces : Prin- 
cipal Pollok ; Ontario and Quebec : Mr. D. M. Ramsay ; Manitoba and North- West : 
Mr. C. W. Gordon ; British Columbia : Mr, VV. L. Clay. 



Ui'i' 



•■i».i.. 



COMMITTEE OX HOME MISSION OVEKTLRES. 

The Assembly resumed consideration of the Report o* the Committee on the Over- 
tures of British Columbia and Algoma. relating to the supply of Home Mission Stations. 

The remaining recommendations of the Committee were considered and dealt with, 
and on motion, duly seconded, the report and the recommendations as amended, were 
adopted. 

They are as follows :— 

The Committee to whom were referred the Overtures from the Synod of British 
Columbia and from the Presbytery of Algoma, also the resolution of the Home Mission 
Committee anent the supply of missionaries for the destitute fields of the Pacific 
Coast and of Northern Ontario, beg leave to report that they have carefully considered 
the same, and recommend the following deliverance for adoption by the Assembly : 

1. That the lack of suitable agent's for our mission work is due primarily to the 
inadequate supply of students for the ministry in our Universities and '"olleges, and 
that the General Assembly urge upon all ministers and elders of the Church the duty 
of pointing out to young men of promise the great opportunity for Christian work now 
open in Canada, and the call there is upon them to dedicate themselves at this time to 
the work of the ministry. 

2. That the Overtures be not adopted, but that, in view of the pressing necessity 
for securing additional men for service in the Home Mission field, the Home Mission 
Committee be authorized to give additional remuneration to students who, either 
immediately after the conclusion of their literary studies or after the ci inclusion of 
their Theological course, may accept appointments for Home Mission work in Northern 
Ontario, the North-West Territories, or in British Columbia for a period of sixteen 
pionths' continuous service. 

3. That students who have taken two full sessions in Theology, after having grad- 
uated in Arts, shall be eligible for license and ordination on certification by the- Home 
Mission Committee that they have spent a year in the mission fields in Northern 
Ontario, the North-West Territories or British Columbia, to which the committee has 
appointed them, but that such students may be licensed and ordained for better service 
in these fields before the expiry of the year, should the Presbytery and Home Mission 
Committee concur in asking the Synod of the bounds for leave. 

4. That the Home Mission Committee be recon-mended to consider the expediency 
of establishing a summer school for training catechists, at which all catechists employed 
by the Home Mission Committee shall be required to give attendance, for at least two 
sessions of two months' c"uration, and that the Home Mission Committee bring this 

[1067] 



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in 



58 ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS OV THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

matter to the attention of Presbyteries employinK or needing such men, and report to 
next General Assembly. 

COMMITTEE ON THE Al'l'LICATIONS OF STUDENTS. 

The Assembly called for the report of the Committee to whom were referred the 
applications of Presbyteries on behalf of students, which was given in and read by 
Mr. J. Carruthers, in the absence of the Convener, Dr. Moore. 

On motion of Mr. Carruthers, duly seconded, it was agreed to receive the report 
and consider its recommendations seriatim. 

The following were the recommendations : — 

1. That the application of the Presbytery of Sydney on behalf of Mr. Melville F. 
(rrant, M.A., for leave to license him be granted. 

2. That the application of the Presbytery of Inverness for leave to license Mr. 
R. P. Murray be granted. 

3. That the application of the Presbytery of Wallace for leave to license and ordain 
Mr. J. H. Hattie be granted. 

4. That the application of the Pi'esbytery of Algoma for leave to ordain Mr. James 
Steele, Catechist, be not granted. 

5. That the application of the Presbytery of Sarnia on behalf of Mr. Robert Bar- 
bour be granted, and that he be allowed to enter on the first year in Theology, on 
condition that he attend classes in Philosophy and pass satisfactory examinations in thf.: 
subject. 

6. That the application of the Presbytery of Superior on behalf of Mr. James L. 
King be granted ; that he be given the standing of a student who has completed his 
first year in Theology ; that he take his second jwar extra-murally, and if his examina- 
tion is satisfactory to the Presbytery, they may certify him to the College next year as a 
student who has completed his second year in Theology, and report their action to the 
nox; 'jeneval Assembly. 

, . That the application of the Presbytery of Superior for leave to ordain Mr. James 
Russell be granted, with transfer to the Westminster Presbytery. 

8. That the application of the Presbytery of Regina for leave to ordain Mr. Camp- 
bell H. Munro as a missionary to the Indians be granted. 

9. That the application of the Presbytery of Calgary for leavo to license Mr. W, 
Simons be granted. 

10. That the application of the Presbytery of Kamloops for leave to ordain Mr. 
Boyle be granted. 

On motion of Mr. Carruthers, duly seconded, the Report as a whole, thus amended, 
was adopted. 

HEl'ORT OF COJIMITTEE ON RECEPTION OF MINISTERS. 

The Assembly called for t'.o report of the Committee to whom were referred applica- 
tions from Presbyteries to receive into the ministry of this Church ministers from other 
Churches, which was given in and read by President Forrest, who moved the reception of 
the report and the consideration of its recommendations. The motion was seconded and 
agreed to. After consideration the recommendations were adopted, as a whole, as 
under : — 

1. The application of the Presbytery of Minnedosa en behalf of Mr. Robt. Gow, 
formerly of our own Church, but lately of the Presbyterian Church in the United States. 

Recommended : That leave be granted. 

[10681 



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OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



69 



I-!'- 



:;-'■: 



2. The application of the Presbytery o'f Quebec on behalf of Mr. Placide Boudreau, 
a native of Canada ; also from the Presbyterian Church in the United States. 

Recommended : That leave be granted. 

3. The application of the Presbytery of Victoria on behalf of Mr. D. A. MacRae, 
B.A., formerly of our own Church, but recently of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States. 

Recommended : That leave b& granted. 

4. The application of the Presbytery of Winnipeg on behalf of Mr. J. C. Madill, 
formerly of the Congregational Church in Toronto. 

Agroed : That the application be declined. 

5. The application of the Presbytery of Westminster on behalf of Mr. J. Reid, a 
minister of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, who has been labouring for a 
year within the bounds of the Presbytery. 

Recommended : That the Assembly declare that the reception of Mr, Reid by the 
Presbytery was irregular, and, inasmuch as there are no papers before the Committee, 
decline to receive Mr. Reid. 

6. The Presbytery of Hamilton makes application on behalf of Mr. J. Booth, LL.D., 
originally of the Free Church, Scotland and latterly of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States. 

Agreed : That inasmuch as Dr. Booth has not appeared before the Committee, the 
case lie on the table till next meeting of Assembly. 

7. The Presbytery of North Bay makes application on b^hp'f of Mr. E. W. Watson 
B.A., of the Congregational Church, England. 

Recommended : That leave bo granted. 

8. The Presbytery of Westminster makes application on behalf of Mr. William H. 
Gray, formerly of our own Church, but latterly of the Presbyterian Church in New 
Zealand. 

Agreed : That the application lie on the table till next Assembly. 

The Commitee calls attention to the fact that strong complaints were made by 
several representatives of Presbyteries that the late date at which several of the circular 
letters were received made it impossible for Pre.ibyterial action to be taken. 

The Committee also calls the attention of the Assembly to the fact that only one 
applicant for admission has complied with the law of the Church in appearing before the 
Committee. 

LOYAL ADDRESSES. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on Loyal Addresses, which 
was submitted by Dr. Herridge, Convener. 

The first presented was the draft of an address to Her Majesty the Queen, which, 
on motion of Dr. Herridge, duly seconded, was adopted. 

The second was the draft of an- address to His Excellency the Governor-General 
and which, on motion of Dr. Herridge, duly seconded, was adopted. 



.,-1 



I. ' 



REPORT OK THE COMMITTEE ON SABBATH SCHOOL REPORT. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Special Committee to whom it was re- 
mitted to consider the suggestions of the Sabbath School Committee's Report regarding 
Synodical Field Secretaries, which was given in and read by Dr. Moore, Convener, who 
moved its reception and the adoption of its recommendations. 

The motion was seconded and agreed to. They are as follows : — 

[lOP^] 






60 ACT8 AND PROCKKDINGS OK THK TWENTY SIXTH OENEKAL A8SKMBLY 

1. That the General Assembly refer to the several Presbyteries and Synods of the 
Church the question of a Sabbath School and Field Secretary for each Synod, the Presby- 
teries tu report to their respective Synods and the Synods to report to the next Assembly. 

2. That a sum not to exceed three hundred dollars be granted out of the Children's 
Day Collection to prepare an othcial list of all schools and Superintendents in our Church, 
and for such clerical work as will enable the Sabbath School Committee to present the 
most accurate returns possible to the next Assembly. 

',i. That the travelling expenses of the six Synod Cor.veners to the September meet- 
ing of the Assembly's Sfbbath School Committee be paid. 

REPORT OF COMMITTKE ON EXKCl'TIVE FOR CHURCH. 



Ht'„ 



The Assembly called for the Report of the Coninw- '^ee on an Executive for the whole 
Cliurch, which was given in and read by Dr. Moore, Conretier, and is as follows : — 

The Committee re the Executive for the whole Church, appointed by last Assembly, 
and instructed to report to this u eting, begs leave to report progress and asks to be 
continued for another year. The > ; mittec also asks that it be strengthened by the 
addition of the following names : L laa. John Hay, James Cormack, D. M. Ramsay, 
Thomas Nixon, Daniel Strachan, th Jloderator, Dr. Sedy^yvick, M in Inters ; John R. 
Reid, R. H. Cowley, James Moodie, F. T.Frost, M.P., and Alexander (i. Farrell, 
Elders. 

The Committee will thuii stand as follows : — 

Rev. William Moore, D.D,, Gonrener ; Rev. Drs. Pollok, Laing, R. Torrance, Sedg- 
wick, W. D. Armstrong, R. Campbell (Clerk), Herridge, Messrs. J. H. Ratcliffe, James 
Cormack, D. M. Ramsay, John Hay, Thomas Nixon, Daniel Strachan, Ministers ; John 
R. Reid, R. H. Cowley, James Moodie, F. T. Frost, M.P., and Alexander G. Farrell, 
Elders. 

Dr. Moore moved the reception and adoption of the report. 

The motion was seconded and agreed to. 



I! 



•,r -1- 









MANUAL, FOR FAMILY WORSIIH'. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on Uniformity of Worship 
and on the preparation of a Manual for Family Worship, which was given in and read by 
Dr. Moore, Convener, and is as follows . — 

The Committee on Uniformity of Worship and on the preparation of a Manual for 
Family Prayer, beg leave to report that owing chiefly to the absence of the Convener 
from Canada, the Committee has been unable to comply fully with the two instructions 
given to it by the last (General Assembly — the preparation of a Directory for Public 
Worship and the preparation of a brief manual for family prayers. Some progress has 
been made. Forms have been prepared for the licensure, ordination and designation 
of ministers, and an edition of the manual for family devotion has been printed at the 
expense of the Convener. The Committee is not willing to submit copies of this to the 
Assembly until it has been repeatedly revised. 

It may be necessary, therefore, to issue several editions liotli of the proposed Direc- 
tory and of the Manual, and this cannot be done without some expense. 

Your Committee therefore recommend that the General Assembly authorize the 
Convener of the Committee to draw upon the Treasurer of the Church for money to 
meet the necessary expence of the Committee for printing, etc., up to the sum of one 
hundred dollars, to be paid from the Assembly Fund. The motion was seconded and 
agreed to. 

[1070] 



1.1 i. 






OK THE PRKSBYTKItlAN CHUKCH IN CANADA. 



61 



t MINUTE KKLATINd \0 THK SERVICKS OF l>R. M'MILt.AN. 

The following minute was, on motion of Mr. E. Scott, seconded by Mr. R. Murray, 
unHniniousIy adopted : — 

The General Assembly deeply regrets the retirement of the Rev. John McMillan, 
D.D., from the Home Mission Committee, Eastern Section; records its high appreci- 
ation of his zealous and unremitting labors for twenty-five years as a member of the 
Committee, and its Convener for eighteen years, and tenders heartiest thanks for this so 
lon^ and successful management of a most important department of the work of the 
Church. 

COMMITTKE ON SOCIAL WOKSHIl'. 

The Assembly resumed consideration of the motion of Dr. Scrimger to eliminate 
certain portions from the book on " Aids to Social Worship," before sending it down to 
Presbyteries for their consideration. 

Dr. Sedgwick moved in amendment, secpnded by Mr. C. B. Pitblauj : — 

That the Committee be instructed in any amendments that may be made in the 
Manual submitted to the Assembly, to have due regard in the future as in the past, to 
the mind of the Church, as that is ascertained through the Presbyteries. 

A vote being taken, the amendment was lost, and the motion was afhrmed as the 
judgment of the house. 

It was then moved by Principal Grant, seconded by Mr. W. T. Wilkins :— 

That the Assembly authorize the appropriation of a sum not exceeding one hundred 
dollars ($100) to defray the expenses of the Committee during the ensuing year. 

The motion was carried. 

Principal Grant also moved : — 

That the names of Principal Patrick, Professor Kilpatrick, Messrs. Pringle and E. A. 
Henry be added to the Committee. 

The motion was seconded and agreed to. 



ADDITION TO CENTUKY FUXD EXECUTIVE. 

It was moved by Dr. Campbell (Agent of the Fund), seconded by Dr. Warden, that 
Principal Grant, Principal Mac Vicar and Dr. Robertson be added to the Century Fund 
Executive. 

The motion was carried. 

The Assembly adjourned to meet in this place this evening at a quarter to eight 
o'clock, of which public intimation was made, and this Sederunt was closed with the 
benediction by the Moderator. 



.1 



SEVENTEENTH SEDERUNT. 



At the same place, on tlie same day, at a quarter to eight o'clock in tlie evening : 

The General Assembly met, as per adjournment, and was constituted with devotion- 
al exercises. Dr. Scrimger leading in prayer, at the request of the Moderator. 
The Minutes of the afternoon Sederunt were read and confirmed. 

[1071] 



i' 






t 



6" ACT8 AND PROCEKniNOS OV THE TWR>fTY-HIXTH GENERAL A8SEMni.Y 
KKOOKliM UK TUJ- .SYNOD Ol" HAMILTON AND LONDON. 

The Convener of the Committee appointed to examine the Records of the Synod of 
Hamilton and London, reported that the Records had not reached the Assembly. The 
Clerk was instructed to correspond with the Clerk of this Synod on the matter of the 
ah*e.<ce of the Record, and to instruct him to see that the Record for the past year, 
as well as those of the next year, oe preseniod to next Assembly. 

THB DOMINION ALLIANCE. 

There was read a communication from the Secretary of the Dominion Alliance for 
the total suppression of the Lic^uor Trahic, recognizing the stand the Assembly has taken 
on the (question which the Alliance aims at promoting, and asking the Assembly to 
appcint four representatives on the Council of the Alliance. On motion, duly seconded, 
Dr. MacTavish i*nd Messrs. A. L. Geggie, G. R. Fasken and J. Winchester were 
appointed such representatives, whose names the Clerk was instructed to forward to 
the Secreta^v of the Alliance. 






u «1 



it .'';, 



.i 

.11 •; 



PETITION ON BEHALF OF MRS. OK.ORflE LAW. 

There was presented and read a memorial from the Presbytery of Melita craving 
that some allowance be made from year to year to the widow and orphan daughter of 
the late George Law, Missionary within the bounds of the Presbytery, from the 
IMinisters' Widows' and 'Orphans' Fund. In view of the fact that the memorial had 
come to hand since the Assembly n.et and the Assembly had no information whether the 
late Mr. Law wa.j connected with the lund and had regularly paid his annual rate, it 
was agreed to remit the Memorial to the Committee of the Ministers' Widows' and 
Orphans' Fund, Western Section, that they might deal with it in accordance with the 
regulations. 

OVEKTURE OF SYNOD OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

There was also presented and read an Overture from the Synod of Britisli. Columbia, 
craving that in view of the great diversity of conditions in mission fields, the General 
Assembly give the Home Missions' Committee of the Synod discretionary power to 
increase the scale of salaries of ordained missionaries to the extent of two dollars ($2) 
per Sabbath. 

The Overture was remitted to the Home Mission Committee, Western Se on. 



TRANS-DANUBIAN ASSEMBLY. 

There was read a communication, forwarded by the General Assembly of the '^.ans- 
Danubian Reformed Churches in Hungary, asking aid from the Assembly toward the 
erection of a Martyrs' Memorial Church at Pozsony, Hungary. 

The Clerk was inetructed to acknowledge receipt of the communication, and to say 
that ;:he Canadian Church, as a branch of the Alliance of the Reformed Churches, 
would be joined in such action as the Alliance may take in the matter. 



ALLIANCK OF REFORMED CHURCHES. 



There was presented an^ read a communication from the Executive Committee of 
the Western Section of the Alliance of Reformed Churches, intimating that Principal 
Mac Vicar was appointed to represent the Alliance at the General Assembly. Dr. Mac- 

[1072] 



OF THE PRKSBVTKniAX CHURr'H IN' CANADA. 



63 



Vicar was heard in explanation of the HiinH,-o)ijeotH and aci.'ieveMents of the Alliance, 
M\d the Agent of the Church was instructed to pay over to the Treasurer of the 
Alliance the sum of throe hundred dollars, us the (|Uota of the Presbyterian Church 
Canada to the expennos of the Alliance. 



in 



I'ETITION OK I'ltKSIIYTBKY OK AMKAX /V LAIlRADOB MISSION. 

The Asseniljly resumed consideration of the I'o^ition from Halifax Presbytery in 
the mutter of supplying Labrador with adequate nuHsionary services. The motion 
ofl'ered at a former Sederunt was withdrawn with the leave of the house, and the following 
motion by Dr. McLaren, seconded .by Principal MacVicar, was carried unanimously : — 

That the Presbytery of Halifax be authorized to ordain to the Gospel Min strv any 
Theological student in whose fitness for the ministry they have confidence, and to 
authorize him to exercise his gifts in the mission field of Labrador, but said student 
so ordained shall not be eligible for a call until ho has completed his studies and has 
received the sanction of the Synod in the usual manner. 

It was then moved by Dr. Moore, seconded by Mr. E. ll. Hutt, and resolved: 

That the (luestion relating to the administration of the ordinances of Baptism 
and the Lord's Supper, and the celebration of marriage in mission fields in Canada, 
whether under the Home, French or Foreign Mis.sion Committees, be sent to a committee 
with instructions to frame a comprehensive measure which may meet the practical needs 
of the Church in all the Provinces, to report the same to the next (ieneral Assembly. 
The committee to be named by the Moderator. 

The following were named by the Moderator such committee : — 

Dr. Moore, Convener ; Dr. R. Campbell, Clm-k ; Dr. Scrimger, Dr. Sedgwick, Dr. 
McMillan, Dr. McLaren, Professor Baird, Dr. R. P. McKay, D. McCormack, Q.C., 
W. Mortimer Clark, Q.C., Hector Mclnnis, .Judge MacTavish and M. Hutchinson. 

The nomination was approved. 



'■ 



THE KLDER-MOnERATOR QUESTION. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee appointed by last Assembly 
to consider whether ruling Elders are eligible to be Moderators in the Courts of the 
Church. No report was given in, and the committee was re-appointed with the addition 
of Dr. Sedgwick ; Dr. McMullen to be Convener. 

GREETINGS TO THE UNITING SCOTTISH CHURCHES. 

The following resolution offered by I'rincipal Caven and duly seconded, was carried 
unanimously : — 

The General Assembly having learned that the union of the Free Church and the 
Unitec' Presbyterian Church of Scotland is appointed to take place in October next, 
desires to express its cordial congratulations, and earnestly prays that the Divine bless- 
ing may rest abundantly upon the United Free Church. Further, the General Assembly 
appoints the Rev. Andrew Robertson, of St. John a, Newfoundland, and the Rev. 
Thomas Fowler, Halifax, to convey its salutations to the United Church. 

UISTKIBUilON OF PROBATIONERS. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Special Committee appointed to consider 
suggestions regarding the Probationers' scheme, which was given in and read by Mr. R. 
J. M. Glassford, Convener, who moved its reception and the consideration of its recom- 



'■ 



[1073] 



. ' ; 



\i 



(J4 ACTS AND PU()CKKDIN(Ja OK THK TWKNTY SIXTH (JKNKKAI, AS.sKMHLY 



|; J, 
"i 



inendationn Hfiuithn. The motion wam Reoonded, And Agreed to. Thtt reoommendHtioni, 
AH tinMlly frAined and adopted, are as folluwa ^— 

I. Cotntnitti'i'M, 

1. That ft Committee on the nupply of vHcancies be appointed for the WoBtern 
(Section of the Church, including the ProvinceH of (.Quebec and Ontario, it not buin^r pog- 
Hibio to include the districtH of the Maritime Proviiicea, Manitoba and Britinh ColuinbiA 
on account of the extent of territory over which tliey spread, and other geographical 
ctmsiderations. 

2. That this Committee shall consist of six members appointed annually by the 
(ieneral Assembly, ho chosen as to entail the least expense consistent with etHciency. 

M. That it shall be the duty of this Committee to meet at least <|uarterly for prepar- 
ing and publishing a ((uarterly scheme of distribution and the discharge of other com- 
petent business. 

4. That they shall call for and receive from Presbyteries in the Section reports of 
the names of all vacanci.<s in their bounds pre))ared to call, and the names of Licentiates 
and Ministers without charges available for employment among these vacancies. 

5. That in pre))aring the roll of Licentiates and Ministers without charge, applying 
for appointments, care shall bo exercised to have it composed only of those whose ([uali- 
fications fulfil the re(|uirements of the Presbyterian Church. 

S. That each Licentiate or Minister may have his name continued for appointments 
two yoars from the date of its insertion oi/ the roll, when it shall be drop[)t>d, unless 
satisfactory reasons can be assigned for its being retained for a longer period. 

7. That in making distribution, the Committee shall observe such order as is most 
likely to secure a hearing for the probationers in all the vacancies, thus giving the o[)por- 
tunity of mutual ac([uaintance. 

' IL Proliatidtti'rx, 

1. That the roll of Probationers shall consist of all Licentiates and Ministers with- 
out charge, certified by Presbyteries and accepted by the Committee. 

2. That in the order of names a distinction shall be made between Licentiates and 
Ministers, the first place being assigned the latter. 

•i. Probationers will be expected to fulfil the appointments tiiven them, unless 
relieved by the Presbytery to whose bounds they are sent, notice of such relief to be at 
once sent to the Committee, who may appoint others in their places. 

4. It shall be competent for the Committee to withhold or withdraw appointments 
from probationers against whom formal complaints of inefficiency or unacceptableness 
have been made by several congregations in which they have officiated, and also from 
probationers who, without sufficient cause, have failed to f' til their appointments, due 
intimation to be sent to them and to the Presbytery certifying them. 

5. The Committee shall send a copy of the list, as socm as completed, to each Pro- 
bationer on the list, and to the Convener of supply in each Presbytery to which they 
appoint Probationers ; and Probationers and Conveners of supply are required to ac- 
knowledge receipt of such list by the first mail. Probationers are also required to apply 
to the Conveners of supply for the Presbyteries to which they have been assigned by the 
Committee for necessary information regarding their appointments. 

6. In accepting a call, Probationers shall at once give notice to the Convener of the 
Committee, and to the Presbytery's Convener in charge of vacancies within whose 
bounds he has been assigned. 

[1074] 



OK TIIK I'ltKHHYTKIUAN CIU lU'H IN CANAIIA. 



65 



7, UnlouK in oxcrptioiiftl chhuh, l*riil)ntinn«r« ure Ut nMimiii in th« vHCdnoy thnmnh 
tho week, and inulorUko Miich |))wti>r.il w<irk nn nmy l)o roi|iiiriul by tlin SesHiuii. 

[II, Pi«nl>yli-tit>M, 

I. Thro*) wnokH hufiiro the cluno of tmoh quKrlnr, I'roHliyterioH hIihII, t.liroiij^h tho 
Ooiivonor of fjiiiir <M»mmittoo <in t,li« Biipply i>f viK^ani-ieM, repurt tn tho (,'onvoner of tho 
AMBenilily's C<iniiiiittoo vHciiiuios in their hounds propured to call for at least ono-half 
Hupply SahhrtfhH of tho ([uarter. 

'J. That they report the naniea of all I.icentiatoH opi-n to appointnionts at the time 
of licensing theuj, and tho namoH of miniHtern availahlo for work, hut those shall ho only 
of mich as have had «t.ited ohar>,'o of congrot,'ation8 in thoir iioundH for a period of not 
leHH than four years, unlesH in some special casos. 

.'{. That a name which has once appeared on the roll shall not ho admitted a second 
time unless the person has withdrawn to engage in mission work under a Preshytery, or 
the iloiiie Mission Conuiiittoe, or from home special reason. 

4. Tho attention of Preshyteries is called to the regulation in force that " Students 
shall not he employed to till tho pul[)it8 of congregations prepared to call, except in 
cases of special emergency ; nor shall ministers in settled charges he employed to tho 
exclusion of those on the Roll of the Committee, except hy special permission of the 
Preshytery." 

5. That in making application for supply each (piarter, Proshytoiies shall have 
opportunity of stating ohjections to the appointment of any prohati<mex on tho list, and 
shall send the same to the Committee for their consideration. 

IV. Rp/minieration. 

That the following scale of remuneration ho re(iuired for the services of each pro- 
hationer per week, with board : — 

In vacancies in which the salary paid the former pastor was $1,(M)0, or less, $10 ; in 
vacancies in which the salary jtaid the former pastor was more than $1,(XK), $1 addi- 
tional for each $100, or fraction of §1(K> above $1,000. 



CHl'Kcn r.lFK AND WOUK. 



The Assembly resumed consideration of the report on the Life and Work of tho 
Church, the recommendations of which, as set forth in the appendix, were considered 
ficriatlin. The last clause of the third recommendation after "public opinion" was made 
to read " Until the fullest emancipation of the people from the power of this traffic, that 
is possible of attainment, has been reached." On motion, duly seconded, the recom- 
mendations as thus amended were adopted as a whole, and are as follows : — 

1. That an earnest effort be made by pastors and ottice-bearers in all our congrega- 
tions, to secure contributions to all the Schemes of the Church from all the members 
and adherents, and that the methods for collecting for the Schemes, where it is neces- 
sary, be so adjusted as to secure this desirable end. 

[1075] 



66 ACTS AND PllOCPJEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

2. That pastors bring before the congregations the subject of the Life and Work of 
the Church as brought out in the reports, in such a manner as may seem to them best 
fitted to engage the interest of the people. 

3. That pastors continue to use such measures as they deem wise to strengthen the 
temperance sentiment of the people, to inculcate the privilege and duty of total absti- 
nence, and to ripen public opinion until the fullest emancipation of the people from the 
power of this tratiic, that is possible of attainment, has been reached. 

SABBATH OBSERVANCE. 



The Assembly called for the Report of the jmmittee on Sabbath Observance, which 
was presented, in the absence of the Convener, by Mr. D. D. McLeod, and which, Deing 
printed and in the hands of members, he called attention to in Lis r^marka. The fol- 
lowing motion, made by Mr. D. D. MacLeod, seconded by Principal Caven, was 
adopted : - 

The (ieneral Assembly would again solemnly testify against the desecration of the 
Lord's Day by unnecessary labour, by mere pleasure-seekers, or in any other way incon- 
sistent with the Word of God. The General Assembly would most cordially encourage 
our Presbyteries, Sessions, and the whole body of our people, in every effort to secure to 
all citizens their right to observe the Lord's Day as a day of rest and worship. 



MR. SWARTOTIT'S ORDINATION. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee to whom was referred the 
Petition of the Synod of British Columbia regarding the ordination of Mr. Swartout, 
whioh was given in and read by Dr. R. P. MacKay, and v as follows : — 

Inasmuch as the General Assembly in eighteen hui,Jred and ninety-seven granted 
the prayer of the Overture of the Presbytery of Victoria to ordain Mr. Swartout, on the 
condiuon that he pass a satisfactory examination upon a course of study prescribed by 
the Presbytery ; 

Inasmuch as Mr. Swartout has complied with these conditions to the satisfaction o^ 
the Presbytery ; 

Inasmuch as, in the interests of the Mission, it is highly important that Mr. Swart- 
out should have power to dispense ordinances and solemnize marriage amongst the 
Indians ; 

Therefore your Committee recommend that ordination be granted to Mr. Swartout 
and that it be referred to the Foreign Mission Committee to make the necessary arrange- 
ments to give effect to this decision. 

On motion of Dr. MacKay, duly seconded, the report was received, and the Assem- 
bly decerned in terms thereof. 

NEW STATISTICAL FORMS. 



The Assembly called for the Report of the Special Committee appointed to consider 
when the new statistical forms, which last General Assembly resolved to adopt, should 
go into effect, and other questions growing out of it, which was given in and read by Dr. 
R. P. MacKay, Convener, who moved its reception and the adoption of its recommenda- 
tions. 

[1076] 



OF THK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



67 



They are as follows, after amendment : — 



1. That the new statistical tables adopted last year begin with the year nineteen 
hundred. 

2. That in the judgment of the Committee it would be better to retain the congrega- 
tional year as now, but that the financial table of receipts for the schemes include 
contributions received for the ecclesiastical year, it being understood that the ecclesias- 
tical year end on the last day of February. The motion was seconded and agreed to. 



OVERTURK REOARDINf! TABULATIXO REMITS. 

There was presented and read an Overture from the Presbytery of Owen Sound, 
which had been transmitted by the Synod of Toronto and Kingston with its approval, 
craving the Assembly to order that the Clerks of Assembly tabulate the returns from 
Presbyteries on the remits sent down to them and have the result stitched with the 
other reports presented at the opening of each Assembly, so as to secure early consider- 
ation of the returns. Dr. Somerville was heard in support of the overture. 

On motion of Dr. Somerville, duly seconded, the Assembly decerned in terms of the 
overture and issued an instruction to Clerks of I'resbyteries to send the returns on 
remits to t!:e Clerks of Assembly not later than the first of April in each year. 



TERM SERVICE OF RULING Kl HERS. 

There was presented and read an Overture from the Presbytery of Owen Sound, 
which had been transmitted by the Synod of Toronto and Kingston, but with its dis- 
approval, craving that the Assembly give authority to such congregations as may desire 
it, to elect elders and deacons for a limited term of years, to be eligible, however, for 
re-election at the expiry of such term, and asking that the overture be sent down to 
Presbyteries in terms of the Barrier Act. Dr. Somerville was heard in relation to the 
Overture, and moved, and it was seconded and agreed to : — 

That the overture be received and laid upon the table till next Assembly. 

OVERTURE rc CLERKS OK AfSEMHLV. 

There was presented and read an Overture from the Presbytery of Toronto, craving 
the Assembly to enact in the terms of the Barrier Act that the Clerks of Assembly shall, 
Vfftile occupying that position, be entitled to all the rights and privileges of members of 
Assembly. 

On motion of Dr. Warden, seconded by Dr. Campbell (Clerk), the overture was 
laid on the table. 

OVERTURE re BOOK OF FORMS. 

There was presented and read an overture from the Presbytery of Hamilton, 
craving the Assembly at as early a time as practicable, to revise the Book of Forms, in 
view of the additions and changes relating to the Church's practice, since the present 
edition was issued. The overture was received, and a Committee, consisting of the 
Clerks of Assembly, with Dr. Laing and Dr. MacLaren, was appointed to consider the 
prayer of the overture and report to next Assembly. 






[1077] 



;'!!( 



"■'.:::f 



'-1 



68 ACTS AND PKOCEKDINGS OF THK TWENTY-SIXTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



HOMK MISSION SUPKRVISION. 

Communications were read from the Synods of British Columbia and of Manitoba 
and the North- West Territories, on the subject of additional b uyerintendence of the 
mission tield. 

On motion, duly seconded, these communications were received, and it was ordered 
that they be referred to the Home Mission Committee, Western Section, with instruc- 
tior to report on the same to the next Assembly. 

RETURNS re ClIANQINO LKN(!TH OK COLLKOE COURSE. 

There were read extract minutes from : — 

1. Home Mission Committee, Eastern Section, disapproving of either lengthening 
the College sessions or increasing their number. 

2. Board of Management of Halifax College, also indicating that in ics opinion no 
change is advisable at present. 

3. Board of Management of the Presbyterian College, Montreal, signifying preferenco 
for four sessions of six months, if there be any change, but opposing the proposal to 
change the time of opening and closing the College. 

On motion of Principal Caven, duly seconded, these communications were received, 
and the Assembly reaffirmed the decision of the Assembly of eighteen hundred and 
ninety-eight, on the subject in (|uestion. 






^li. 



CHURCH UNION. 

The Assembly called for the Report of the Committee on Church Union. Principal 
Caven gave a verbal report, indicating that the Committee had no occasion to meet or 
take action during the last year, but suggesting that it might be well to continue the 
Committee, as an organ of action, should any opportunity arise for its interposition. 

On motion, duly seconded, the Committee was reappointed, and is as follows : — 
Principal Caven, Concener; Revs. Dr. Sedgwick, Principal Grant, Principal MacVicar, 
President Forrest, Dr. MacLaren, Dr. Laing, W. G. Wallace, B.D. ; Dr. R. P. MacKay, 
W. J. Clark, M. McGillivray, M.A. ; Dr. D. M. Gordon, Dr. J. McMillan, and 
Messrs. Justice Maclennan, W. B. McMurrich, B.A.,Q.C. ; W. M. Clark, Q.C. ; Judge 
Creasor, Dr. J. D. McDonald, M. Leggat, John Cameron, U. McQueen, W. Paul, Colin 
McArthur, Hon. D. Smith, R. Murray, J. D. McGregor, Hon. D. C. Fraser, and George 
Mitchell, M.P.P. 

STATED COLLECTIONS. 



The Assembly ordered that the Stated Collections for the Schemes of the Church, 
in congregations in which there are no Missionary Associations, be made as follows : — 

1. French Evangelization, on the fourth Sabbath of July. 

2. Assembly Fund, on the third Sabbath of August. 

3. Colleges, on the fourth Sabbath of September. 

4. Ministers' Widows and Orphans' Fund, on the third Sabbath of October. 

[1078] 



OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



69 



5. Home Missions, on the fourth Sabbath of November. 
G. Manitoba College, on the third Sabbath of December. 

7. Augmentation Fund, on the third Sabbath of January, 1901. 

8. Aged and Infirm Ministers' Fund, on the third Sabbath of February, 1901. 

9. Foreign Missions, on the second Sabbath of March, 1901. 

Ordered also that all congregations and Mission Stations be enjoined to contribute 
to the Schemes of the Church. 

Further, that contributions be sent to the Treasurer of the Church as soon as pos- 
sible after the collections are made. 



VOTES OF THANKS. 

It was moved by Mr. A. H. Scott, seconded by Dr. R. Torrance : 
That the grateful acknowledgments of this General Assembly are due and are 
hereby tendered : — * 

1. To the minister of St. Matthew's Church ; to the members of the Session and of 
the Board of Management, for the use of their historic building in holding the last Gen- 
eral Assembly of the century. 

2. To the Committee from the Churches in Halifax, and especially to the Chairman 
of that Committee, for the accommodation provided for the commissioners, and for the 
excursion so much enjoyed on Saturday afternoon. 

3. To the citiisens of Halifax for their kindness generally, and more especially to 
the families that have opened bo'.<> hearts and homes for the entertainment of the 
commissioners. 

4. To the President and Principal of the Halifax Ladies' College for the delightful 
evening spent at their invitation. 

5. To Senator and Mrs. McKeen for the hoars which were so much enjoyed at 
"Maplewood." 

6. To Principal and Mrs. Fraser for the opportunity given to members of Assembly 
to view the inner workings of the School for the Blind. 

7. To the Pastor and members of Fort Massey Church for the reception on Tuesday 
evening. 

8. To the Press, secular and denominational, for giving to the outside world ex- 
tended accounts of the proceedings ; and to the Proprietor of the Halifax " Herald " 
for copies gratuitously distributed. 

9. To the railway and steamship companies for special facilities of travel granted to 
the commissioners, members of their families, and all who had anything to do with the 
present General Assembly. 

The motion was unanimously carried. 



MINUTES. 

It was agreed to hold the Minutes of this Sederunt as read and sustained. 



[1079] 



70 ACTS AND PROCKKDINOa OF THK TWKNTY-SIXTH GENERAL AHSEMBLY 



. .i; 



';;t 



CLOSED. 

The business being finished, the Moderator addressed the Assembly, briefly review- 
ing the proceedings, and called upon IWr. C. B. Pitblado to offer prayer. 

The Moderator then asked the Assembly to join in singing the 122nd Psalm, verses 
six to nine, which having been sung, he paid : - 

In tho name of the Lord Jesus Christ, only King and Head of the Church, and by 
the authority of this Assembly, I now dissolve this Assembly and order another General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Canada to meet in the City of Ottawa, and 
within St. Andrew's Church there, at eight o'clock in the evening, on the second Wed- 
nesday in June, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and one. 

The Moderator then closed the Session with the apostolic benediction. 



ALLAN POLLOK, Moderator 
ROBERT CAMPBELL, 
ROBERT H. WARDEN 



^' I Joint Clerks of Aiisemhly. 



[lOSO] 



OF THK FRKSBYTKKIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



71 



MINUTES OF COMMISSION OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
APPOINTED JUNE 21sT, 18P9. 



At Toronto, and within the Board Room of Knox College there, the Commission of 
the General Assembly named to appoint a Principal and Professor for Manitoba College, 
met on Friday the ninth day of February, One thousand nine hundred, and was 
constituted with prayer by the Rev. Dr. Warden, at the request of the Chairman. 

Sederunt: Rev. Pr'.'iipal Caven, D.D., Chairman ; Rev. D. H. Fletcher, D.D. ; 
Rev. Robert H. Warden, D.D. ; Rev. Daniel MacTavish, D.Sc. ; Rev. W. J. Clark, 
Rev. J. A. Macdonald and Mr. Hamilton Cassols. 

Mr. Cassels was asked to act as Clerk. 

The Chairman read apologies for absence from the mieting from Rev. W. T. Her- 
ridge, D.D. ; Rev. John Laing, D.D. ; Rev. D. Currie and Rev. Neil McPherson, B.D. 

The Chairman also read a letter dated 23rd January, 1900, from Rev. Prof. George 
Brvce, LL.D., requesting him to convene the Commission and a further letter from 
Pri i. Bryce enclosing the formal application of the Board of Manitoba College to the 
Commission, wherein they nominate the Rev. William Patrick, D.D., of Dundee, Scot- 
land, for the appointment to the position of Principal of Manitoba College and Professor 
of Greek and Hebrew Exegesis therein. 

After consideration, it was moved by Dr. Warden, seconded by Dr. Fletcher, and 
unanimously resolved that : — 

It having been reported to the Commission of the General Assembly by the Board 
of Manitoba College that said Board has unanimously nominated the Rev. William 
Patrick, D.D., of Dundee, Scotland, to the position of Principal ot Manitoba College 
and Professor of Greek and Hebrew Exegesis therein, and that very explicit testimony 
to Dr. Patrick's qualifications for said position, in respect of scholarship, skill in teach- 
ing, and capacity for administration, had been borne by distinguished ministers in 
Scotland and England, the Commission of the General Assembly resolves to appoint and 
hereby does appoint the Rev. William Patrick, D.D., to the office of Principal of Mani- 
toba College and Professor of Greek and Hebrew Exegesis therein. 

It was moved by Dr. McTavish, seconded by Mr. Clark, and unanimously resolved, 
that the Presbytery of Winnipeg be instructed to take the proper steps to induct Dr. 
Patrick into office at such date prior to the opening of the summer session of the College 
as may be convenient and suitable for the Presbytery and Dr. Patrick. 

Dr. Warden, as Clerk of Assembly, was instructed to write to Dr. Patrick to inform 
him of his appointment, and Principal Caven was instructed to telegraph to I'rofessor 
Bryce to inform him of the action of the Commission. 

The meeting was closed with the benediction by Mr. Clark. 



, 



HAMILTON CASSELS, 

Clerk. 



WM. 



CAVEN, 

Chairman. 



[1081] 



i! i.j 



l.dl . ^S 



r^ 



2 



REPORT OF THE HOME MISSION COMMITTEE, 
WESTERN SECTION, 1899-1900. 



To thu Veneiublti 



♦,>..'i(. . '.' Atioeinhly : 



Tweiity-tive yo. . iiftve . " elapsed since the union of the various branches of the 
Presbyterian Church. Durin;^ ti's (]uarter of a century, there has been contributed by 
the western section of the Church about one and one-half million dollars for Home 
Mission work. The progress made during this period has been very marked. In 1875, 
there were 1.S2 mission fields and eighty-six augmented congregations, in the western 
section of the church. Since that date 641 new mission fields have been organized, 
making a total of 859. Of this number, ninety-three have been merged into other 
congregations, 162 are now upon the augmented list, .386 on the list of Home Mission 
fields, and 218 have become self-supporting, so that during the last twenty-fivg years the 
Home Mission Committee has fostered and helped to self-support 218 congregations, and 
raised to the status of augmented charges 162 mission fields, all of which are now 
giving generous help to the various departments of the work of the Church. 



■J ■ V 



REVIEW OF LAST YEAR'S WORK. 



During the past year forty-two new mission fields have been opened, seven mission 
fields have become self-supporting, and twenty-one have been raised to the status of 
augmented charges. The accompaning reports show the progress made during the year 
in the several Presbyteries, (1) in the Provinces of Ontario and Quebec, and (2) in 
North- NVestern Canada. 



ONTARIO AND QUEBEC PROVINCES. 






We are able to report encouraging progress in various districts within 
Quebec our bounds. For some years we thought we did well if we barely held our 
own, now we are doing a little more than that, as witness the interesting 
work going on at Grande Mere and Coaticook, and the new missions at East Angus, 
and Bishop's Crossing, established during the past year. A new church was built at 
East Angus and opened in January amid much enthusiasm, the people themselves con- 
tributing liberally, and only a small debt remains on the building. A church will be built 
at Bishop's Crossing during the coming year, and altogether the prospects are excellent 
in this section of the eastern townships. The utilization of our magnificent water power 
seems to be putting new life into certain sections of the province, and the Protestant 
populati(m is in better heart and altogether the situation generally has taken a turn 
forward. Even in our extreme outposts we are pleased to note the hopeful ttuie of our 
missionaries and teachers. Our missions are arranged into ten groups, comprising some 
twenty-seven preaching stations, manned by seven ordained missionaries, and three 
Divinity students. 



8 

Expended by conKrogations direct to misHion stations within tho bounds of the 
Presbytery, includini,' (isHistance given in erecting new churches, !i?li,;{r»0. 

There is nothing special to note in the Montreal I'resbyttr; Homo Mis- 
Montreal si'J" fields this year. Montreal West in free fron> debt, "'h Annex pro- 
nuHes well, under Mr. Morrow's care, and we are ((uite 1 teful for the 
cause at St. Anne's. 

During the year one of our two mission fields. East Lancaster, was 
Glengarry united with St. Andrew's Congregation, Lancaster, and becomes a strong 
charge, now settled and paying a stipend of $1.(W0 per annum. The 
other field, Hephzibah Church, Williamstown continues as heretofore, under Rev. K. 
McDonald. Mission work is being carried on by the A'ankleek Hill congregatitm at the 
Ridge, etc. This field is reported as developing well, and may soon become a separate 
charge. 

A manse has been erected in Aylwin. One has also been secured in 

Ottawa Casselman. A church has been erected, and opened free of debt in Vars. 

Bell's Corners and Stittsvilk , ^ been united into one charge, and is 

now ministered to by an ordained missionary. A » v station has been formed at Glen 

Almond, and joined to the Portland field. Succ ul work has been done in all the 

fields during the year. 

Some changes have ,. ^n ^ade within the Presbytery l)OundH, 

Lanark and which have affected one of c ' mission stations. The work in all the 

Renfrew fields has been well maintain>.,J. ilocklift'e still continues to be operated 

with Chalk River, so t onr missionary, Rev. G. Campbell, has a 

very wide and difhcult parish to overtax . iice shows favourably under Rev. M. D. 

M. Blakely's ministrations, fifteen having been added to the communion roll during the 

year on profession of faith. Stafford, etc. — Here a radical change has been made. 

Osceola has been united with Cobden, thus forming a self-sustaining charge, and so 

weakening the mission financially. Notwithstanding this, Stafford Mission is building 

a manse for the minister, at a cost of $1,100, of which $100 was contributed by the 

Presbytery. The contributions to the Schemes are not being reduced, but rather 

increased. Kilialoe was operated along with Madawaska in the North Bay Presbytery 

for the winter. During the summer each is operated separately. 

There have been no missions advanced to the Augmented list during the year. A 
new mission has been established in Lanark, which at the present time meets all the 
expenses of its operation, and it is hoped that it will refjuire to exist only for a short time. 
The moneys raised within the bounds for Home Mission w^ork and not reported are $100 
for Scotland Mission Manse, also considerable sums for Lumber Mission work. 

This Presbytery has only two mission fields, and in both of them very 
Broekville satisfactory work was done during the year. At Stone's Corners, North 
Augusta and Fairfield the services were largely attended, and eleven 
communicants were added to the roll. Needed repairs and improvements were made 
on the church property in two of the stations. The people are entering upon the 
summer's work in good heart and we look for encouraging results. Morton, Lyndhurst 
and Ellisville. — This interesting field also did well. The church at Morton was reno- 
vated to some extent, and is now very comfortal)le, eight ct)mmunicants were added 
during the year. Both fields ho{)e soon to be able to support ordained missionaries. 

There are fifteen mission fields in this Presbytery, as against seventeen 
Kingston at last report. Ardoch, etc., has been added to the Wilbur field, and 
Marmora, etc., has been put on the Augmentation list. There are now 
twenty-six churches, one having been built and opened in Marmora village. There are 
seven ordained missionaries within the bounds, the Rev. W. H. Cram, M.A., having 
been recently appointed to Ernestown, Bath, etc., all of whom are doing well. 
Deseronto, West End, etc., and Demorestville, have i)een su])plied the whole year 
by students. Every field, so far, has received the full grant. Very .seldom has any of 
them except Demorestville paid the missionary in full. Matawatchan, etc., only 
re(iuired $2.00 of the $.%00 grant per Sabbath, for last summer student supply. 
Eight fields were served by students last season. During the winter months, the 
more distant ones had three day.s supply at Christmas, while Consecon, etc., was 
supplied eleven Sabbaths. Every mission field except three reported contributions 



■t; 



"I'v. '[if' 



!• 



I ../ ■„':i ' 



'■■■ yf. 



It; 



to the Sohemc.-i of the Church, including Home Missions. No report has been 
received of money given by congrogations to mission fields within the bounds. 
Deputations of members of Presbytery visit the fields yearly, en()uire into their 
condition, the progress made, and dispense the nacraments of Baptism and the 
Ldrd'H Supper. Thirty Sabbath schools are reported with an aggregate average attend- 
ance of 7<)5. 

There nro three mission stations in which we cannot for some yeurs 
PeterbOPOUfirh expect any great growth, because of the character of the coun'^ry. 
Our most difHcult field to operate is Cardiff, etc. The con- 
gregation is widely scattered, and the bolt of territory between these stations is very 
rugged. Apsley and Clydesdale are somewhat more encouraging;. The first mentioned 
place has fre({uently given promise of permanency, but the presence in a small village and 
in a very poor country, of Methodist, Episcopalian and Presby erian preachers has 
interfered with this. At Clydesdale things are dlHerent. Thore is no other wurk and 
the people are hearty and interestad, and purpose building a new church this year, for 
which almost the entire amount has been subscribed among themselves. Lakehurst and 
Rockcroft is our most ttourishing mission. The former has been organized for some 
years, and is very well managed. Though crippled somewhat with a debt for their 
present church, they struggle on in good spirit. At Rockcroft we have been successful 
in purchasing a comparatively new church, with splendid eciuipment in shape of a shed 
and upper hall, together with a nice parcel of ground. For this these few heretofore 
unorganized families subscribed $1(X). From friends they procured $100, and the 
Presbytery assisted them with a balance of $50. They are very happy in their new 
quarters, and with an organ given by a lady in Peterborough, and a good student 
missionary much is expected this year. Our Committee has it as their object to so 
interest our young people throughout the Presbytery with the importance of this work 
that the General Assembly's Committee may be relieved of or assisted in the cost of 
maintenance. 

There are no mission stations within the bounds of this Presbytery 
Whitby and all the regular charges are self-supporting, with the exception of 
one, Ashburn and IHica, which receives aid from the Augmentation Fund. 

The mission fields of this Presbytery have done as well as could be 
Lindsay expected of them. All three are in the north country, where the canoeist 
finds a paradise, but the farmer can scarcely make a living, and the farmer 
is the object of the Churches care, and the source of the fields contributions. 

Minden and Haliburton has been in charge of Rev. James Gilchrist, who has 
brought to that wide and rough parish considerable Home Mission experience, a strong 
constitution and a stout heart. The last station of the four in this field to erect a church 
sets about the work this summer. Coboconk and Kinmount is a field, long, narrow, 
deeply cut into by several lakes, and quite sparsely settled. Rev. Hugh Brown is in 
charge. Sebright and Uphill is a student's field. Mr. P. W. Currie and Mr. A. A. 
Scott have done successful work in turn during the past year. In all of these fields 
here are rumors of pulp concessions, development of iron, copper, gold or corundum 
mines, new railway lines, etc., etc. The happy era of commercial prosperity is just 
beyond the skyline. Perhaps it may soon dawn. 

The work in the various mission fields (seven in all) was well maintained. 
Toronto Fairbank and Fisherville have passed from the Home Mission list, and is 
now an augmented charge. Malton has become self-sustaining, and it is 
hoped that Swansea will not require a grant. 

St. Andrew's Church, Toronto, has maintained the mission in St. Andrew's 
Institute with much vigor, at considerable expense, besides paying oflf $1,200 of the 
debt. Central Church maintained Elizabeth Street Mission at a cost of over .$550. 
William Street Mission was worked by Erskine Church at a cost of $470. Claremont 
Street Mission, by West Church at a cost of $780. 

Last year we reported four mission fields. This year we have only 

Orangeville one to report, and that one is supplied by an ordained missionary. 

Proton Station has been united to Flesherton and Eugenia. 

Caledon East and Tarbert and Keldon, have been raised to the status of augmented 

charges, with good prospects of soon becoming self-sustaining. Corbetton and River 

view, is supplied by an ordained missionary, the Rev. G. C. Little. No new fields 



openud duriiif^ the ye»r. All money raised within the boundn of PreHhytery, ■<» fur 
as known, hiiH been sent directly to the General ANHemi)ly'H Mission Fund. 

Besides the mission stations ni M unkoka, under the sunerintendance of 
Barrle Dr. Findlay, there are three r.tission groups, each under the char(,'e of an 
ordained missionary. Minesin^, Midhurst, and Kdunvale. — Rev. T. Paton 
has labored here for about two ycarj diligently. KtForts were made last year to 
strengthen them. Presbytery aimed to induce Minesing and Pldenvale to unite and 
place a church building at a point midway between their present places of worship. 
This arrangement gave hope of uniting a new Htation with them. The etforts to bring 
about these changes were not successful. The Kdenvale l^tation which has used the 
small church belonging to another body for years, resolved to build or to procure a build- 
ing for themselves. There is more hope of growth in this hitherto weak station than of 
those which are cimnected with it. Medonte, includes Victoria Harbor, Moonstone and 
Vasey. — These stations have been supplied acceptably l)y Kov. (Hoorge Craw for 
about five years as ordained missionary. The field of labor is difhcult, owing to dis- 
tances between the congregations and the roads in a hilly country. The Presnytery has 
appointed a committee to visit the charge and see whether it should not be put on the 
fooling of a charge receiving aid from the Augmentation Fund. They contributed last 
year 8100 for the Schemes, $38 of it ro the Home Mission Fund. Wyevale, GibKons, 
and Van Vlack. — Rev. A. Edington has labored here for about eighteen monthrt. The 
stations are not strong in number or means, yet they deserve the support of the Home 
Mission Fund. There are earnest workers in the tirst and third named. Gibson's is 
very weak. It is not likely to become a populous district. 

During the past year several changes have been made in our mission 
Owen Sound fields, for the purpose of consolidation and thereby curtailing expense. 
Crawford, formerly worked in connection with Williamsford, has 
been transferred to the Presbytery of Bruce, being now part of the pastoral charge of 
West Bentinck, etc. There was some anxiety as to the future of VVilliamsford when 
separated from Craw ^'d, but the difficulty has been overcome by another re-adjustment. 
Desboro, which f(jrmed part of the settled charge of Keady and Peabody, asked the 
Presbytery to b'j separated from the other two congregations and to be united with 
Williamsford. The request was granted, and the result has so far proved very satis- 
factory. Keady and Peabody have developed increased strength and are now about 
to call a minister, whilst Desboro and Williamsford, though at present supplied by a 
student, are looking for an ordained missionary in the fall. 

During the past winter, Mr. VVm. Martin has done good work in the Indian 
Peninsula, as indicated by the increased liberality of that field, notwithstanding the 
determined effxirts of the Latter Day Saints to proselytise that whole district. The only 
other field in care of the Presbytery, is Lion's Head and Lindsay. Mr. Sieveright has 
done faithful work there and has considerably extended the field, almost necessitating a 
sub-division. Mr. Sieveright's term has now expired, and a new man is wanted for this 
district, one with Gaelic being specially requested. 

With regard to Home Mission work in the PresViytery of Algoma there is 
Algoma but little to add to what has been reported oy the Rev. Dr. Findlay, 
Superintendent of Missions. As some indications of progress it may be 
stated that last winter some fifty-five new communicants were received, and that more 
would ha' e been received had communion services been held on all the fields ; also that 
the contributions of our mission fields to the Schemes of the Church were considerably 
larger than formerly, and further, that at least ten of our mission stations are building 
churches this year, or are preparing to do so. On some of the older fields where there are 
no new settlers coming in, and very little prospect of any coming, there is little or no 
growth reported or to be expected. Yet these fields cannot be abandoned nor neglected. 
At many other points, however, the outlook is decidedly hopeful. At Little Current, 
for example, where the lumbering industry is being revived on a large scale, and where 
the ])opulation is likely to be almost doubled within a year, the litth; congregation ia 
recovering from a period of depression and weakness, and agrees now to raise $4fX) a 
year towards the support of an ordained minister, whereas latterly they could barely 
raise $250. At Blind River, where the cause wao almost dead It is being revived in the 
8an)e way as at Little Current, and the people are making preparations to build a church. 
At Ophir mining operations are already employing a large number of hands, and other 



1 I 



« 



I 



II 



ft 



properties in the iieighhoiirhood are Itfiiig devuloiiud. 'I'liia held iieedH and will likuly 
Kxiii ciill for Hii ordained iniiiiNtur. (ioiilaii Kay, hitherto one of our weakont tieldN, ia 
looking u|>, an more settlurH are coming in and a new railroad, the Algoma (.'ontral, i» 
going through. A site haH been secured for the building of a church, nnd some prepata- 
tiouH have been made towards its erection. On Manitoulin Inland, Michaul'H May is again 
starting up as a liusy village, and thiH Hummer will receive weekly service from the 
student supplying the South Iky tield. ( )n the Mills tield, by a slight roarrangenienr, the 
missionary there will be anle to give supply every Saltbath to Long Hay, an important 
summer resort. For particulars regarding other tieldssee Dr. Findlay's report. 

During the present summer the stalt' of workevM on the Home Mission fields of 
Algomii Presbytery consists of nine ordained ministers, tifteen students and seven 
catechists, thirty-one in all. By these all our tields are supplied for the summer. We 
have never had dirticulty to tind supply for all our tields for the summer. Our dilKculty 
has been to tind supply for the winter. Last winter several of our tields sutl'ered 
seriously through lack of service, and if the tifteen students now at work shall return tu 
college as most of them are likely t'» do, next October, the Presbytery will be face to face 
again with a serious drawback to the successful carrying on of its Home Mission work, 
namely, the lack of service during the winter. The Presbytery earnestly hopes that the 
General .Vssembly will take such steps as may remedy this ditticulty, and may furnish 
supply for Home Mission tields in winter as well as in summer. 

There is nothing of very sjtecial interest in the Home Mission work of 
Saugeen this Presbytery during the past year. There are two mission stations, 
Mildmay and Ayton, which are growing weaker in conseijuence of the 
English people leaving and the (Sermans taking their place. The field is being supplied 
by a student this summer, because they are not able to support an ordained 
missionary. Cedarville and Ksplin are improving, under the wise and etiicient manage- 
ment of the Rev. Mr. McDonald, missionary to that tield for two years. Two new 
churches have been erected recently, and it is hoped that this charge will very soon be 
self-supporting and have a settled minister over them. 

Knox Churcli, Dracon and Metz, were transferred from the list of misnion 
Guelph stations, to that of augmented congregations, with the view of encouraging 
them to call a stated pastor, and they have been receiving appointments, 
in common with other vacancies, from the roll of probationers. 

Efforts have been made to procure another station with which to connect Livingston 
Church, leaden, and the village of Wellesley was regarded as a suitable place. This was 
in the bounds of the Presbytery of Stratford, which made an attempt to work it, but 
not having succee 3d it was offered to the Presbytery of Guelph. A deputation was 
appointed to visit the field, but it was found that there was no opening, so that Living- 
ston Church remains alone, and, so far as present prospects enable us to judge, must 
continue for some time. Eden Mills and Gale Church, Elmira, still occupy the standing 
of mission stations, the former under the stated care of the minister of Chalmers' 
Church, Winterbourne, and the other under that of the minister of Rockwood. 



Report of Rev. 

Dr. Findlay, 

Superintendent 

of Northern 

Ontario 

Missions 



Perhaps the chief ditticulty felt in all the Presbyteries, in this 
portion of the Church, during the past winter, was the lack of men. 
Time was, when it was not a matter of so much importance, 
whether men were plentiful or not. If not, the people (juietly waited 
till spring. But that day has passed. Our people, with few 
exceptions, have come to look differently on the subject and to 
conclude that service is just as necessary in the winter months as in 
the summer. 

The supply was as follows : — Presbytery of Barrie. Three tields vacant, five 
supplied as follows, viz : — Two ordained men, one student, one approved catechist, one 
catechist. Three of these were received from the Committee in October, and two of 
them were obtained afterwards. 

Presbytery of North-Bay. — Vacant, four fields; occupied, twenty-one. Of these ten 
were ordained men, three were students, two approved catechists, and six were 
catechists. Of the twenty-one, fourteen were received through the Committee, and 
seven were arranged for afterwards. 



Htl 

nil 
ml 



In the Prenbytory of AIi^diiih, four Holds were v»»C/inli of the twenty-seven mipplied 
litHt Hiimmer Of the twenty thre^ Niipplied, Home were only partinlly, for the rennon 
given above, laok utf men. Of choNe ^tvin^ iupply, nine were ordained men, tive were 
Htiidenta, lix were CHtechiHtn, and thrue approved catechists. Of theae twenty-three, 
Hixteen were received from tho Committee, liMd seven were appointed after the ('<*ni- 
mittee roHo. 

Two or three points here are worthy of notice. 1st. That Hixteen men had to l>n 
secured, more than a third of the whole number, after the Committee held its meeting 
in Octnlier, which means that Huthcient men were not available from the list of the 
Committee. How these men were obtained would form a very interesting chapter in 
Home Mission work. Five of them were pastora who had just resii^nud charges in 
other pirts of the Church, and were ready to take hold of the work in our neody fields. 
None of them, however, were able to enter un the work till after the new year, 
impoHing a loss of three inonthH service in each of those tieldH. May their example 
prove to others that there ia Homethin^ better for the man who Ih prepared for work 
than candidating. 

.\nother point in, the comparatively large number of catechists employed, ten out 
of a total of forty-three. An a rule the catechiat \h not the most ethcient labourer, and 
none more ready to acknowledge thin than the catechist him.self. 

Surprise is sometimes expressed that so many of this class of labourers are employed 
by us, but what are we to do I Leave our Kelda vacant till something better turns up ? 
1 fancy not. This is a matter for the Church to settle through the (ienural .Vasembly. 
The fields are waiting for them. Hut till this happy change is effected, I fear we will 
have to continue the services of the catechist. The people, as a rule, have no hesitation 
in deciding, when the (jueation is, catechist or no supply. 

The Holds in each of these I'reabyteries were visited by me during the winter, as 
circumstances seemed to recjuire and as time permitted. In the Presl)ytery of Harrie, 
Rev. .John Diividson, ordained miasionary, was inducted on January I7th. Mr. 
Davidson's services are being highly appreciated by his people, andcorre8i)onding growth 
may be expected. 

The staff of ordained men was strengthened in the Presbytery of North Hay, by the 
presence of Messrs. Watson and Uuy, who were placed at Orrville and Hyng Inlet, 
respectively ; by the appointment of Mr. .John Hurnett, formerly of Keady, to Rosseau 
for two years, and by the appointment of Mr. F. Smith, formerly of Hradford, to 
Mattawa till April. 

In the Presbytery of Algonia, we secured the services of Mr. D. McKachren, 
formerly of North VVilUamsburg, to Deabarats, and of the Rev. .1. A. McDonald, 
formerly of Varna to Richard's Landing, on the Island of St. .Josei>h. Those appoint- 
menta indicate growth in the field, yet the growing time is only commencing with u.^, as. 
we believe the only remedy for the lack of supply in the winter is to secure the services 
of ordained ministers, who will rem'iin on the Held for a series of years, aa rapidly as the 
fielda can be brought up to the standard of 8upj»ort. It is with pleasure that we report 
that our peoi)le are coming to realize thia, and are found ready, aa they are able, to put 
forth the effort necessary to secure thia most desirable end. The presence of theae 
brethren in the field ia beginning to toll for the advancement of the work. A*: 
Rosseau, a manse is under way for the accommodation of the minister's household. ( <n 
the Doabarata field, one church is nearly completed and two others are undor way. ' )n 
feL. .Joseph's Island, in addition to the five churches already j-rected, one ia drawing n jar 
completion and another ia contemplated during the cominiT summer. At Milltown, a 
station on the Held occu])ied by Mr. .Taa. Anderson, crdrtiued miasiorj ry, a new churv'h 
has been erected, which will bring three stations intn one common cen're. At Warreii, 
a church most creditable in its appointments to thnsa who have had it • construction in 
hand, was opened during the winter. Also at I'tcevson, in the Pie.^'ytery of Barrie, 
our people have during the past year built for tham^rflvea a nouse la which to worship. 
All these things go to show that there is life amontr our people. Though they may be 
few in numboi-8 in any one place, for we have lost heavily during the past few years by 
the emigration of many of our i)e8t families to the West, especially from Muskoka and 
Parry Sound, and though many of them may not be possessed of much of this world's 
goods, yet to the extent of their ability, they are ready to do what in them lies for the 
upbuilding of the Master's Kingdom. 






8 



4. 
i1. 



In the Presbytery of Algoma, we will occupy thirty-one fields instea x of twenty- 
seven, as last year. Of the four additional fields, two are new, the <^roun'' beir^ v^ccupied 
this year for the first time. These are the Duck Islands, where ther, is an important 
fishing station, also a large saw mill to be in operation this year, ''^ne other is Mount 
Nickle, which forms the centre of a number of new mines which are being operated in 
the vicinity of Sudbury. The other two fields are caused V)y the rearrangement of the 
field at two points, for its more etticient working. Cxore Bay, the capital of the 
Manitoulin District, passes off the list of missions and becomes a vacant congregation, 
under augmentation. 

Mr. H. Broad, ordained missionary, has been appointed to the Michipicoton field. 
Between railway construction and mining operations, which will be carried on with 
vigor from this time forward, a *'ery important field of operation will be opened to 
our representative in this district. We have received from the company owning 
the town site at the mouth of the Michipicoton river, the deed of a lot for church 
purposes. Little Current will again enjo} the services of an ordained missionary, in 
the person of Mr. Robt. Burton. This will give us an addition to this Presbytery of 
four ordained missionaries since the beginning of January la^t. 

Mr. Hume, who has given excellent service, not only on his own field, but also in 
the Presbytery, retires on the opening of navigation, Mr. Garrioch taking his place. 
New churches are proposed, in addition to those already referred to, at Burpee, to 
replace the old one, which has become too small for the increasing congregation at 
Honora, and at White Lake. All these are on the Manitoulin Island. 

In the Presbytery of North Bay, a new church will be erected immediately at 
Madawaska, on a site granted by J. R. Booth, Esq. It will be chiefly for the 
accommodation f)f the men connected with the railway at this divisional j)oint. One 
additional field will be worked under the care of th'^ Home Mission Connnittee in 
this Presbytery, Mattawa, which was formerly an augmented charge. 

We have seen a good deal lately in print regarding the development of Northern 
Ontario. The picture has not been overdrawn. I believe there are resources in this, 
what some wise acres have been pleased to call "God forsaken country," which the 
most knowing ones have little dreamed of. To-day it is a country of running streams 
and growing timber and silent rocks. But these waters are being harnessed to machinery, 
and the timber is being brought down the streams to give the machinery employment, 
and here and there the rocks are no longer silent, for the hand of man is being laid 
upon them and perforce they are compelled to yield up their concealed treasures. 
This means, among other things, population. Busy crowds of workmen, the 
strength of any nation, gathered in the towns, and we venture to say, the cities of 
Northern Ontario, changing this raw material into products for the use of man in 
every clime. The beginning is scarcely made yet, but it is coming, and with the 
coming development, there is surely a duty laid upon us to see that the Word of 
Life is provided for those who make our country what it will be. ^ 

The placing of an ordained missionary at Michipicoton and the opening of a new 
mission field at Mount Nickel, indicate that we begin to feel the growth in these new 
regions, it also indicates the line of action which it will be ours to follow in the 
future. 

Meantime we will watch developn;snts in the interests of the people who are 
sure during the coming summer to find their way into the country. Railways wil. 
be constructed, and new mines opened. Other industries will follow close on the 
heels of these. A larger number of saw mills, than ever before, will be in operation 
this season, but these are so situated that most of them can be reached by the mission- 
aries in the different fields. 

There has been contributed to the Schemes of the Church, during the past year, 
the sum of $1,550, perhaps a little more, from the mission fields of these three 
Presbyteries. (){ this sum, at least §1,000 was contributed to the Home Mission Fund, 
and about $.'iOO to Augmentation. 

There is but one mission station in our Presbytery— Port Robinson — 

Hamilton which is practically at a standstill. We experienced difficulty in securing 

suitable supply during the latter f)art of the winter, which did not in any 

way improve the prosjjects. In addition to regular contributions to the Home Mission 

work of the Church, $()30 were expended on mission work in the City of Hai ilton. 



9 



The Mission at North Ekfrid may be said to have been stationary during 
London the past year, so far as development in numbers or liberality is concerned. 
The Presbytery, however, is now making a strenuous effort to re-arrange 
the adjoining congregations, in order to connect it, if possible, with another congrega- 
tion, so as to constitute a pastoral charge. 



Chatham 



Bentpath has built a new church, which was openod this spring, with a 
small debt. Finances in better shape than over before. Buxton had no 
service in the winter months, but is now under Knox College 
Students' Missionary Society for the summer. Harrow is out of debt and doing well 
under Rev. A. R. Linton. Morpeth is prospering under Rev. A. A. Laing and the 
attendance larger than ever before. The people are taking steps to erect a church. Puce 
has had some ditticulties in the past, and Rev. Mr. Yeomans is doing what he can to over- 
come them. South Bush, Shoantown and Sycamore is a new field, handed -ver to 
the Presbytery by the Knox College Students' Missionary Society last fall, and , doii.j 
well. They are building a new church at one of the stations this spring. On tne whole 
field good work has been done and substantial progress made, botli materially and 
spiritually. 

At Sombra and Duthil, which for a year or two was the only Home Mission 
Sarnia field in this Presbytery, good progress has ))een made, and the Presbytery, 
having obtained a grant from the Home Mission Committee, are preparing 
to put an ordained missionary in the field. We hope to have a settled congregation here 
in the course of tii»\e. A new station was opened last year in the Township of Ennis 
kiljen, and was worked for the sunnner by the Students' Missionary Society »( Montreal 
College. This station is now joined with Marthaville and will n.ake a strong mission 
charge. 

There are no mission fields in these Presbyteries, the country 
beuig long settled. With a few exceptions, which derive assistance 
from the Augmentation Fund, the congregations are self-supporting and 
prosperous. 



Stratford, 

Huron and 

Maitland 



This was for many years one of the Missionary Presbyteries of the Church. 
Bruce We are so no longer. For the last few years we have had but one mission 
field, namely, Salem, Gillies' Hill and Dobbinton. Commissioners from this 
field attended our last meeting of Presbytery and asked to be erected into a vacant con- 
gregation and promised as salary, $G00. They have therefore been transferred to the 
Augmented List. 



-, 4 



NORTH-WESTERN CANADA. 



The Rev. Dr. Robertson, Superintendent of Missions for Manitoba, the North- West 
Territories and British Coluirbia, reports as follows : — 

The year 1899-1900 was perhaps the most prosperous in the history of Home Mis- 
sions in Western Canada. Four missions became self-sustaining in the Synod of Manitoba 
and the N. W.T., and tiro in the Synod of British Columbia. In the former Synod fifteen 
missions were advanced to the status of augmented charges, and, in the latter, four. 
Li this way six missions became self-sustaining charges, and nineteen augmented congre- 
gations. Thirty-eight other missions in the two synods ([ualified and should have l)een 
placed on the augmented list, but the state of the Fund forbade. The expectations of 
the people are in this way disappointed, devolopement is arrested and the mission list 
left in a congested state. 

During the year, thirty-four new missions were organized, .-.ome by 

New Missions dividing missions that had become unwieldly and that needed more 

frequent supply, and others by the occupation of new territory ; of 

these new mi.saions, twelve are in the Synod of Manitoba and the North- West Territories, 

and twenty-two in that of British Columbia. The Klondike missions are included in the 

latter. 

At date there are 115 missions connected with the Synod of Manitoba 
Missions and and the North- West rerritories with 4)^8 stations; and eighty-five 
Stations missions, with 311 stations connected with that of British Columbia, 
making, for both, 200 missions, with 749 stations. 



10 



Missions among 
Foreigners 



Prosperity, 
causes of 

chase of suppli 
and stock, has i- 



The (General Assembly's Home Mission Committee voted $3,500 
for the extension of mission work amon^ the foreigners in the 
Synod of Manitoba and the North-West Territories, and $1,500 for 
the Syaod of British Columbia. Negotiations are now going on 
with the view of securing eight or ten suitable missionf.ries to begin this work. These 
foreigners differ from Canadians in language, manners, customs, ethical and religious 
opinions, and every effort should be made "^o ev: iigelize, educate and assimilate them. 
A medical missionary has been appointed alread" and within a month it is ' xpected two 
Hungarian, tvv(j Galician and two German missi-znaries will be at work. Two teachers 
are also being aecured, for schools are urgency needed. For people of thi.s kind, it 
seems ditticult to secure men of evangelical ' lews and Christian character, hence caution 
is necessary. In the interests of patriotis'ii as well as religion, however, the work must 
be u»idert;iken and should be vigorously prosecuted. Since these missions are not yet 
st-u'tod and the missionaries not yet on the t^ronnd, they are not reckoned in the report. 
Through interpreters the gospel has alveady been preached in some of the foreign settle- 
ments. 

The cauS'iS conviibuting to the prosperity of the work last year and 
its extension are many. Good crops and fair prices for grain, cattle and 
dairy produce have helped much. The Vjuilding of railways in the 
mountains and on the prairie has set money in circulation, in the pur- 
and the payment of labour. The large inflow of settlers bringing money 
oired confidence. There has been a growing demand for land in old 
districts, and pric j have decidedly advanced. Timid, panicky capital has ventured more 
boldly of -ecint years west of Lake Superior, establishing branch banks everywhere, so 
that, where we iiad only six or eight banks not many years since, we have now over 
ninety. This has reduced the rate of interest and stimulated the development of the 
resources of the country. 

Duriiig 1898 nearly 40,000 immigrants settled in the West, in 1899 

ThimigPation over 50,000, and the forecast for the present year is from 70,000 to 

75,000. Of the inHow for the past two years about one-half were 

foreigners from Northern and Central Europe. This year the {)roportion of English- 

spealcing settlers pron'ises to be much larger than for some time past. Great Britain, 

Eastern Canada and the United States all contribute to this result. 

While many settlers are purchasing land in localities settled for 

Where Immi- souie time, yei, the great majority are pushing out into new regions. 

grants Settling it is expected that 20,000 will find a home in the Province <■■ 'vl- 

berta this season. The land along the Calgary and Edmonton Railwa_^^' 

for a considerable distance back, is taken up, and settlement extends down alonj; tht' 

North Saskatchewan for sixty miles, The country south of Lethbridge and Macleod ij 

also receiving large accesaions, [)rincipally from the United States. Here the Mormons 

have their home, and ^heir numbers are rapidly increasing. 

Along the " Soo " line of railway and in the Moose Jlountain country, 
SOO Railway from 8.0(K) to 10,0(X) are likely to settle ; while along the Regina and 
Prince Albert Railway, people are ;.;oing in in successive waves. Settle- 
ment ib not only extending back from the railway, but across the North Saskatchewan 
and down the river east and south-east of Prince Albert. 



Dauphin 
District 

Within two 



The building of the Canadian Northern Railway through the Dauphin and 
Duck Mountain District has sent shoals of settlers in that direction. The road 
is now finished for about '2(M) uiiles north west frcjin (iladstone, and it is 
proposed to Ijuild 100 miles more this season, u]) the Red Deer Valley, 
years it is said the road will reach Prince Albert. Since the North 
Saskatchewan Valley is one of the finest in the whole West, and settlements are found it 
Battleford an.l otlier points along the route, it should not be long ere this northern line 
is constructed to Edmonton, and settlers are anticipating the carrying out of this policy 
by making homes in advance of construction. 

The building of the Winnipeg and South Eastern Railway is opening up 

Rainy River a valuable tract of land south-east <if Winnipeg and stimulating settle- 

District ment. To the country lying west and south-west of Port Arthur, the 

Port Arthur and Rainy River Railway has givvn hope. This section 



11 

of Ontario is rich in minerals, and contains millions of acres of farming anJ grazing 
lands. Settlement is thickening along the Rainy River, and the develof)ment of mining 
and the prosecution of the lumbering industry will provide a market for them and for 
such settlers as find locations between I'ort Arthur and Fort Frances. 

The raining industry in th.< Kootenay was seriously disturbed List year 
Koo'^enay by a severe strike. The British Columbia Legislature passed a law short- 
ening the day of miners working underground from ten to eiglit hours. 
The mine owners thereupon reduced the day's wages from §.S.5() to $,S.(X). The miners 
contended that they had not asked for the reduction of hours, and refused to work for 
less than their former wages ; the inevitable followed. The mine owners ottered a com 
promise— $3.25 — it was declined. Recently matters have been satisfactorily adjusted, 
and the men are at work. By the building of railways, the uroction of smelters, the 
installation of improved machinery, the application of electricity, etc., preparations are 
being made to increase the mineral output. 

Mining in the Yukon is now settling down to the conditions of an ordinary 

Yukon industry. The exodus to Cape Nome is largely of the drinking, gambling, 

speculative class, whose removal is rather a gain than a loss. American 

authorities estimate the gold output of the Yukon for this season at from thirty-two to 

thirty-five millions — a larger estimate than over before. The employment of machinery 

and the cheapening of supplies will increase the output. 

The changes made in the staff in the Yukon may be noted. Mr. 
Yukon A. S. Grant withdrew from Dawson, much to the regret of the congre- 

Missionaries gation and the general public, and Mr. J. J. Wright, of Lyn, was 
aj, pointed in his i)lace. Mr. R. M Dickey, the jjioneer missionary, 
sutt'ered in health and resigned. Mr. D. G. Cock took his place. It was represented 
that from five to eight thousand men were working along the creeks, for whose souls no 
one w.as caring. This spring Mr. Cock was app tinted to labour among them, and Mr. .1. 
A. Sinclair, of Bannett, was .sent to supply his place at Eldorado. Mr. .lames Russell, 
who has had a good deal of experience in dealing with men, as a missionary in Belfast, 
and subsequently at Schreiber, was appointed to Bennett, and to give such supply as was 
practicable to White Horse or Closleigh, which is- the head of navigation, which is in the 
vicinity of a very valunble copper mine, and to which the railway is to be extended this 
season from Bennett. Closleigh is likely to become a town of some importance. Mr. 
Pringle, who had such hard service in the Telegraph Teslin District, and who labored 
for the past year at Atlin, was granted a furlough of three months, and Mr. (ieorge 
Pringle sent to supply the field in his absence. Should the needs of the district re([uire 
it, two missionaries are likely to be employed in the Atlin and Pine City districts here- 
after. 

The changing conditions of the West are dwelt on somewhat in detail, that the 
Church may be prepared to provide for the spiritual needs of the present and prospec- 
tive populati(jn, and so advance the interests of patriotism and religion. 

Since (juestions are being asked continually about tiie foreign inimi- 
F0Peig"nerS, grants, it may be well to make a few statements regarding them. Of 
Character of the Deukhobortsi, only about 7,500 came to the country. They are 
settled in Northern Assiniboia, just outside the Manitoba Itoundary. 
I'hey are illiterate, only about four per cent, of them lieing able to read ; their religious 
views resemble those of the (Quakers or Friends. The Galicians are settled in colonies, 
400 families east of D tminiun City, 250 near Pleasant Home, 1,200 in the Diuphin Dis- 
trict, l,(iOO at Edna, forty to sixty miles east of Edmonton, etc. The Germ ms, Swedes, 
Icelanders and Finns were settled in colonies too, but of all these nationalities a num- 
ber are leaving the colonies for various reasons. 

As far as one can judge, the.se people are blessed with average health, and are men 
and women of good physiiiue. They do not fiock to cities and towns, but st.ay on the 
land, and they gladly accept land that Canadians and others rejected years ago. Men 
and women are not afraid of hard work ; they are helping to solve the " servant girl " 
problem, and the problem of cheap labour. They have much to learn yet, but they are 
apt pupils, and because of their industry and thrift, and their inexpensive mode of liv- 
ing, they are sure to jirosper in worldly matters. In faith they are Roman or CJreek 
Catholics, Lutherans, or members of the Reformed Church. Althougli they understiiid 




.1 



12 



h 
f.i 



Eiigliah but imperfectly, the Roman and Greek Oiitholics attend religious services in 
cimsiderable numbers, when conducted within their reach, even when the ministers are 
Protestants. 



Too Few 
Missionaries 



For a number of years past the supply of missionaries has been in- 
adequate for winter service, and the work of the Church has accord- 
ingly suffered. List winter sete>i(ee»i missions were without supply, and 
several more with only partial supply. This spring, after all the men 
available for Western work were selected, there were still fourteen vacancies. Subse- 
quently eight of those appointed declined to serve in the West, bringing the vacancies 
up to twenty-two. By getting men from Britain and the United States ; by appointing 
graduates of the Bible Training School in Toronto, and through the efforts of a few gen- 
tlemen who have the interests of the West at heart, a number of these vacancies have 
been filled, but eleven missions at this moment stand vacant. This lack of supply has 
done great harm in the VVest already ; it has inflicted severe, irreparable losses on the 
Church in Northern Ontario, and should be remedied. The supply of men in the 
Church seems ample. The moment a prominent congregation in the West is vacant, 
letters pour in asking for a hearing — many of them from men who never had a charge. 
Were the General Assembly to require all graduates to labor a year in the misdion field 
before settling, great relief would come to Home Mission work. And if, while engineer- 
ing, law and medical students are salted with heavy fees, the Church exacts no feei from 
the theological student, surely it is a small thing that they give ono year's service to 
advance her work, especially when they are liberally remunerated. Am.I, if not, why 
should the students not pay for their own education ? 

The growth of the Church in the I.Iaritime Provinces and the < idei- { „";. of Ontario 
is now practically over. With the inflowing stream of populatio i to i 'le West, unless 
we make more adequate provision, the same calamity will nvtjroake up that has over- 
taken the Presbyterian Church in the United States in connecfiuii with the Western 
country. This (jueation of supply should be faced, and now. 



Tlie Summer 
Session 



still continues to give substantial help dui.ng tiie wint'ir. Last 
year several students from Eastern collvg.- — notally Queen's — took 
their last session in Manitoba Colie£- \ aud entere^:^ on work in the 
mission field at on'-^. Others are purf^uing tlie sap'.u course this year 
Were more students, while undfc»' /fl'^'ates, to remain one year (icHinuously in the field, 
and take one session in Manitoba Jo) leg ^, fJ;v«y would greatly advance the work of the 
Church, reduce the enormous bill for ; ravelUd- expenses, and gain Tor themselves an 
experience of great v.ilue in l^':^ work >r onra;;r/ ,.on and administ-ation in their future 
ministry. Last year thirty-nine studeii'.:^ cteaded the sunim<^r session, and the num- 
ber this year promises to be about the same. 

By the help of the Church and Manse Board, there were thirty- 
Ctiurehes Built four new Church buildings erected last year in the Mission fields 
t)f the two Synods. 
In all Presbyteries there is a commendable effort being made to remove or reduce 
church and manse debts, and the effort is likely to succeed. 



Sacraments 
Dispensed 



Tr crease in 

Communi- 

canii> 



Arrangements continue to be made to have the sacraments of the 
Church dispensed in all missions under the care of student mission- 
aries. 

The returns made showing the accessions to the membership of the 
Church are very incomplete, but, as far as they go, they show a 
decided improvement on the returns for the past four or five years. 
The gains have in some cases risen to sixteen, eighteen, twenty-three 
and, in onf case, twenty-six per cent., as e(*mpf»:ud with last year. 

c (I tinue to increase in numbers and efficiency, and they are encouraged 
Sa'Xtath to i)rooure the li'.erature prepared by our own Church. Many oi the 
Se'lOOls schools are Union, but in them the best work is not done, and mission- 
aries and people prefer such Sabbath schools as are distinctively Presby- 
ir i.T. T'lir-i-e are, in both Synod?, about 440 schools with an attendance of about 
2r>,()n>) -4C^olars ; but many of the schools are kept open only six months. In Manitoba 



13 

alone there are said to be 20,000 children who attend no Sabbath School ; the propor- 
tion in the Territories and British Columbia is larsjer still. With no sowing of the ^ood 
seed at home or in the Sabbath School, what shall the harvest be ? 

For a number of years past British churches and congregations have 
Finances been giving substantial help to establish and extend Home Missions in 
Western Canada. They withdrew about $5,000 of the $12,000 or more 
given last year, and they inform us that little will be got in future. Efforts 
were put forth du'^'ng the year to get Ontario and Western congregations and 
individual members of the Church to take up the burden laid down by British people, 
and not without some success. The average supplement required to maintain a mission 
is about $250 a year, and pledges for the support of thirty-seven missionaries have been 
secured. Why should not special contributions enough be forthcoming to support 100 
missionaries ? This is a time of unexampled prospqj ity, should not our lavish expendit- 
ure on luxuries be generously tolled to advance the interests of patriotism and true 
religion ? St.itely churches, cushioned and carpeted, pipe organs and paid singers, do 
not comport well with Home Missions and Augmentation deficits and a cramped and in- 
adequate Home Mission extension. Deducting the contributions of British Churches, of 
the Maritime Provinces and Western Cana''\, the people of Ontario and Quebec con- 
tributed last year only about thirty cents per communicant for Home Missions in the 
W^est. The evangelization and the assimilation of the hetero<^eneous elements settling in 
the West require and deserve a more generous contribution from the rich and [)ro8perou8 
Province of Ontario and the wealthy city of Montreal. 

The mission fields contribute about two thirds of the salaries of missionaries, and 
the Home Mission Committee, one third. 

The following figures for that portion of the Churoh west of Litke 
Statistics Superior will show the gain since the union of Jf-'To and, as compared with 
last year's figures, the gain last year. The retunia nor, being complete, the 
figures are only approximate. 



1875 



1899 



1^)00 



Synods 

Presbyteries 1 

Congregations 2 

Missions to whites ^0 

Preaching Stations (Missions and Congrega- 
tions) 34 

Ministers (Professors, Pastors, ordainei lis- 

sionaries) ... 8 

Catechists, Teachers, et al (unordained .... 1 

Families, whites 349 

Single Persons, whites 226 

Communicants, whiles 432 

Contributions $5,421 



MISSION TO LUMBERMEN. 



2 


2 


14 


15 


115 


136 


198 


200 


-\025 


1,068 


214 


238 


136 


142 


14,840 


1.6,613 


9,920 


10,035 


20,552 


24,035 


$319,929 


$339,125 



^^ 



This mission is administered by a Committee appointed annually by the Syncxl of 
Montreal and Ottawa, the work being within the bounds of that Synod. Last year 
25,000 copies of books, pamphlets and tracts v.-^re distributed. Several ministers were 
engaged for the winter months in visiting the ii juber camps, and much gcjod work was 
accomplished at a comparatively small cost. The revenue for the last year did not 
exceed $250. This revenue is provided by congregations and friends within the Synod 
of Montreal and Ottawa. 



r 



u 



STUDENTS' MISSIONARY SOCIETIES. 






The Home MisHion Committee has been under srreat obligation to the Students' 
Missionary Societies in connection with the several Theological Colleges of the Church 
for the etticient helj) they have given. The Committee is anxious to bring these Societies 
into closer relationship and has so arranged that the fields to be worked by them, will, 
instead of being assigned them by individual Presbyteries, be hereafter allocated to them 
by the Committee itself. It is desirable that the fields occupied by the Students' Mis- 
sionary Societies should have continuous service during the whole year, and a aub-com- 
mittee ha4 been appointed to confer with the several College Societies with a view to 
accomplish this. During the past jfear work been has carried on l)y these Societies in 
fifty Home Mission fields. 

This Society has been in existence thirty-one years. During 
Montreal College the past summer eight students labored under its auspices, with 
most encouraging results. The fields occupied were Portneuf, 
Lochaber, Kensington and Verdun, Saguenay, and Lake St. .John, all in the Province 
of Quebec, and Bonfi(»ld, Commanda and Nipissing, Killaloe and Tramore, and Enniskil- 
len in the Province of Ontario. The Saguenay field was worked by a student having 
both French and English. T' .* receipts of the Society amounted to $1,391.63. This 
year the Society is working seven fields, one of which is under the care of a missionary 
able to conduct services in both French and English. 

This Association increased the number of its fields last year. 
Queen's College from six to eight. In these eflicient service was given during the 
summer months. The following were the places occupied : — 
Chelmsford, Canoe Like, French River, St. Joseph's Island and Ilavensworth all in the 
Province of Ontario, Orrwald in the Pr *ince of Manitoba, Fairlight in Assiniboia and 
Mt. Lehman in B.C. The receipts of thi^; ^society for the working of these fields amounted 
to $1,953. '4. Tn addition to this, there wero received from Professors, students and 
graduates $325. V-"") towards the Foreign Mission branch of the work of the Association. 
This summer the Association is supplying eight Home Mission fields. 

The Society in this College was organizad in 1844. It has been 
Knox College instrumental in opening up a large number of mi.ssion fields in the 
more sparsely settled districts of the country, many of which are now 
self-supporting congregations. Last year thirty fields were occupied by the Society, 
seventeen of which were worked for six months, seven for five months and six for four 
months. In connection with these fields, there are 110 preaching stations with about 
650 families. The amount raised by the Society for carrying on their work during the 
year was $2 *^91.43. '"liis is exclusive of the amount contril)uted by the fields which 
were supplied by the missionaries connected with the Society. 



Four fields are worked by this Society, which during the past 
seventeen years has rendered splendid service in the Home 



Manitoba College 

Mission field. The receipts last yeai were $1,320.30 



4 1 

I "fl ■ ' ■■■ 1 






MISCELLANEOUS. 

As reported to last General Assembly, a committee of ladies was organized 
in Toronto for the purpose of secuiing funds to send trained missionary 
nurses to the newer districts in the Yukon territory An urgent appeal was 
received from the Rev. J. Pringle, fir work of thi.s nature to be undertaken 
at Atlin, B.C. The Committee were fortunate in securing the services of two earnest 
Christian ladies. Miss Mitchell and Miss Tone, both of whom were trained nurses. These 
left for Atlin in the beginning of July and immediately began their work. Their 



Atlin 
Nurses 



15 



services have been of L^reat vtilue in that coininuiiity ami have been highly appreciated. 
The need of a suitable building in which to carry on their work waw greatly felt, and 
through the instrumentality of Mr. Pringlo, a small hospital has been erected, and 
according to latest intelligtnce, the nurses are now carrying on their work within its 
walls. The contributions rect'vcu by the Ladies' Committee f(jr the supp()rt of this work 
amounted to $1,550.15. The expenditure in connection with the outtit of the nurses, 
travelling expenses, maintenance, etc., has been soujewhat in excess of this, so that the 
fund is at present in debt to the extent of $110. It is hoped, however, that contributions 
will be forthcoming with which to meet this indebtedness and enable thi- ladies to carry 
on the work, so long as the nece-ssity exists in that district. 

At its meeting in March the Home Mis8i<.n Connnittee adopted the following 
resolution ; — " The Committee desires to thank most heartily the ladies who were 
instrumental in securing the services of nurses for Atlin. The results have been such as 
to justify our church in undertaking the work. The Connnittee wttuld also express its 
appreciation of the earnest and self-denying work which Miss Mitchell and Miss Bone 
have accomplished. Not only have tliey most skilfully and tenderly ministered to the 
physical needs of the sick in the hospital and tents, but (iod has signally blessed their 
efforts to present Christ and His claims to those who have l)een under their care. The 
Connnittee would most earnestly commend the work to the sympathy and hearty support 
of the whole Church. 

The Rev. A. S. Grant, at the close of his term of service last fall, 

Yukon returned from Dawson City, where he was instrumental in bringing 

missionaries the congregation to a self-supporting point. The Church has reason 

to be grateful for such a mi-ssionary as Mr. (Jrant, who rendered 

splendid service in Dawson City at the formative period of its history. Y'our Committee 

invited the Rev. J. J. Wright, of Lvn, to succeed Mr. (Irant in Dawson City. iMr. 

Wright promptly responded to the ih ,nd left a deeply attached congregation in Ontario 

who were most reluctant to part w. ■ him. His services have been highly appreciated 

in Dawson City, and although the population there has considerably diminished, the 

congregation continues self-supporting. Through the inHuence f)f Mr. Wright, aided by 

p. number of active Christian ladies, a comfortable hall has been secured in the centre of 

the city for reading room and social gatherings, and made so attractive as to be a counter 

influence to the saloon. 

The Rev. D. G. Cock, a graduate of the Presbyterian College, Halifax, continues 
efficiently to prosecute the work at Eldorado, whero he succeeded the pioneer 
misuionary, the Rev. R. M, Dickey, who rstired from the lield last fall, and who, during 
a visit to his friends in Ireland, has been rendering valuable service in deepening 
interest in our work. 

The Rev. J. A. Sinclair has spent the greater part of the year at Bennett, where he 
was instrui":"n*:;»i in firecting a comfortable church building. At the request (jf the Com- 
mittee Mr. Sinclair thi.' spring ivent north to visit the Creeks, where mining is actively 
carried on. His place has Ijceii taken by the Rev. James Russell, who for the last two 
or three years has served the church at Schreiber, Ont. 

The Rev. J. Pringle spent most of the year at Atlin, his services !>eing highly 
appreciated by the whole community. In view of the privations and hardships 
experienced by him during the last two years, the Committee granted Mr. Pnngle a 
three months' leave of absence. He is now visiting his family and it is hoped will be 
present at the meeting of the General .Assembly. During his absence the work at Atlin 
and Pine City is being carried on by Mr. George Pringle, whose salary, it is expected, 
will i)e met by the people in the field. 

Heretofore the work in the Yukon has been administered directly by the Executive 
of the Home Mission Connnittee. At its meeting in March, the Committee decided to 
place the work under the care of the I'resbytery of Westminster, so that the missionaries 
and fields may bear the same relatiotiship to that Presbytery that other Home Mis-ion 
fields and missionaries have to the Presbyteries within whose bounds they are. It is 
believed that this will conduce to the more effective working of the whole district. 



Your Committee have been greatly indebted to the Coh nial 
Committees of the British Churches for generous contributiiiis 
received from year to year. In addition to 'grants from these Com- 
mittees, a large number of congregations iu England Scotland and 
Ireland have for some years past contributed for the support of mission fields in the 



British 
Contributions 



16 



:! 'i 



"North- West and British Columbm. These contributioiiH were i)ledKed for n period of 
three or five years, and averaged about §rJ,(X)0 a year. The period for which these 
proiuiseH were given has expired, so that the amount received from this source was, last 
year, nearly $5,000 lesH than .the year preceding. Intimation Iihh been received from 
many of. the congregations that they will not l)e able to continue their assistance, so that 
in future it will be necessary to raise in Canada nearly the entire revenue required for 
the conduct of the work. The Committee desire to place upim record their cordial 
approciatiim of the valuable help received from the home lands in })a8t years, both in men 
and in money. 

The Rev. II. M. Dickey, our pi(jneor missionary in the Yukon, being now on a visit 
to friends in Ireland, has agreed, at the solicitation of the Co:>>»>iittee, to present the 
claims of our work to the Colonial Committees as well as to a nuii.ber of the more 
important congregations. Arrangements have been niade for his addressing the 
General Assemblies of the Churches in Scotland and Ireland. 

At the meeting of the Committee in March, the follownig 
Current Year's resolutions were adopted : 

Estimates l. That for the year beginning .\pril 1st, 1!)00, a sum not 

exceeding $20,500 be granted to the Synod of Manitoba and the 
North-West, and a sum not exceeding $213,500 to the Synod of British Columbia, with 
$4,(550 additional for the Klondike — these sums to cover the entire expenditure from the 
funds of the Commictee (including special work among the Galicians), excepting the 
salary and expenses of Dr. Robertson, and the travelling expenses of missionaries to and 
from their fields of labour. 

2. That these Synods, through their Home Mission Committees, be recjuired to 
submit to this Committee, at its semi-annual meetings in March and October, a linancial 
statement for the six months then ending ; and accompanying this a report, on the 
schedules prepared by this Committee, of the work done during the half-year in the 
respective mission fields, with the names of the missionaries, the amounts contributed by 
the people, and the appropriations made by the Synod's Committee to the several 
fi^ilds. 

3. That these Synods, through their Home Mission Committees, be instructed to 
submit to this Committee, on or before April 25th annually, a financial statement of the 
receipts and expenditure for the year, ending March .'ilst, together with an annual 
report -*? the several fields, on the schedules furnished by this Committee." 

Thi grants thus made for work in the two Western Synods are about $4,000 in 
excess of rhe preceding year. The estimated re(iuirements for the current year are as 
follows: — 

Ontario and Quebec $29,850 00 

Manitoba and the North-West 20,500 00 

British Columbia 23,500 00 

Yukon Territory 4,650 00 

Salary and expenses i>i superintendents 4,300 00 

Travelling expenses of missionaries 6,500 00 

Expenses of committee and executive, printing, interest, 

etc 3,500 00 

Proportion of general expenses 1,200 00 

$94,000 00 



wori 
rencl 

Sil 

with! 
suit!! 
wit 111 
pdinl 

Mil 



The Connnittee recommend that the following be appointed the Ex- 
;, Executive ecutive for the ensuing year: — Rev. Dr. Warden, Convener; Revs. Dr. 
Somerville. Dr. Robertson, Dr. Findlay, Dr. Armstrong, Rev. Messrs. 
M.^.W. McLean, A. A. Scott, A. Gilray, Messrs R. Kilgour, .John Penman and Lieut- 
Col. McCrae. 



Dr. Robertson's 
New Position 



In accordance with the action of last Assembly, Dr. Robertson 
has given much time during the year to his duties as Field Secre- 
tary of th' and of the Augmentation Committee. He has visited 
many conjj, jgations all over the Church, deepening interest in the 



17 

work and securing iiicreftsed contributions on its hehnlf. The value of the sorviceH 
rendenid l)y him in this connection will bo more apiunent each succoediii),' year. 

Your Committee had before it the question of supply for the 
Summer Tourists places visitod by tourists during,' the summer season, more parti- 
cularly in the district of Muskoka. The Presbytery of Harrio, 
within whose l)ound3 this district lies, have appointed a small committee to arrange for 
suitable supply, and the (Jonvoner and Messrs. Mcl'horson and Neil wore associated 
with this Committee with a view to securint; Sabbath services at all the more important 
points fre(iuented by tourists. 

While it is encouraging to report that a much larger number than 
Missionaries formerly ■>) the missionaries em[)loyed by your Committee are ordained 
Needea men, so that most of the fields have continuous supply during the 

whole year, it is a matter of regret that ditticulty is still being ex{)eri- 
enced in finding a sufticient number of suitable mi;n to undertake the work, more especi- 
ally in the larger mission tields of the church iu the Muskoka, Parry Sound and Algoma 
districts, as well as west of Lake Superior. Your Committee appointed deputies to visit 
several of the colleges of the church list spring, with a view of interesting and securing 
the services of the members of graduating classes. While some of these cheerfully responded 
to the call of the Committee, the number was (juite insutiicient for the necessities of the 
deld, and when the Committee closed its session in March last nearly thirty tields were 
without supply. Correspondence was immediately opened with students of several of the 
Theological Seminaries in the United States as well as with several ministers in charge 
in our own church. The services of some of these have been secured, and yet a con- 
siderable numljer of fields are without regular supply. 

Y'our Committee gave anxious consideration to this subject, and the following 
resolution was adopted : — 



The Home Mission Committee recommends that the General 

Recommendation Assembly extend the term of .students' preparation for the niinistry 

to four years, including a period of twelve months to be spent in 

some practical work either in Heme Mission work or as assistant to some minister of a 

congregation, in which latter case report is to be made to the Home Mission Committee ; 

And that, except by special permission of a College Senate, this year of {)ractical 
work be spent after the completion of college studie.^ ; 

And that no student be certified by a College Senate as having completed his theo- 
logical course till he be certified by the Home Mission Committee as having finished this 
term of practical work. 

It is scarcely possible to review the work of the past year and the progress 
Close made, without being constrained to say " What has God wrought. Forty-two 
new mission fields have been opened, twenty-one mission stations have been 
raised to the status of augmented charges, and seven have become self-supporting congre- 
gations. There have been added to the church on confession of faith, in the tields under 
the care of your Committee 1,652 new members, a larger number than in any former 
year. 

The Committee feared at its meeting in March, that the year would end with a de- 
ficit of from S8,()00 to S10,0(}0 and that it might be necessary to curtail the work in the 
near future. It is encouraging, however, to report that as a result of a special appeal, 
the shortage was made good, with the exception of §788, when the books closed on 
March Mat. Since that date the entire debt has been removed. This is all the nmre 
encouraging when it is borne in mind that the year began with a balance on hand of 
•|)8,lKX( less than the preceeding year, and that the contributions received from Britain 
have been reduced by nearly $5,000. Your Committee, however, do not lose sight of the 
fact t'^at the estimated expenditure of the year upon which we have now entered is 
^14,000 in excess of the recei[)rs of last year. In other words, to enable the Committee 
t<i i)ay in full the grants proiiused and to carry on its work without curtailment, it will 
require a revenue from our own church of fully 20^ in excess of the Sotal receipts of 
last year. It ought also to be borne in mind that the increase of immigration to the North- 
West and the opening up for settlement of the vast territory in new Northern Ontario 
will necessitate in the next few years a largely increased Home Mission expenditure. 



i«. ■' 



l» 



Your Committee, howovor, hdvo coiiKdoiice not only in tlio iihility hut in tlu' willin^,'- 
neHB of (>ur people to miiintHin tlie work, iind eiirni^Htly solicit tliu hearty co-openttion of 
miniHters itnd neHsionN in preHentin^ its clainiH to their people. They en[)eci)illy »sk that 
the workers and the work l>e rememliored liefore (iod in thf pul)lic prayerNof the Sanctu- 
ary as well an in the homes of our people. " I'rove nio now liorowitli, saitli the Lord of 
Hosts, if I will not open you the windows of lieaven, and pour you out a hlessing, that 
there shall not be room enough to receive it." 



All of which is respectfully submitted. 



'Turoiilii, June lul, IttUi). 



KOIST. H. WAKDKN, dmi-pni'r, 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 

/ tjive and bciimiilli tn llir Treostirer for llw time, hehuj of tin' Home Min.tion Com- 
mitti'e (Wi'sh'tn Si-rHoii) of tlw I'li'slnilfrimi Church In doiada, iv trust fur thf >i(dd 

Gommltti'.i', tin' .-iK/d of 

to be paid out of mil /ifrsomd f!>lnt<\ iclthont iin]i dediu'tlon irhittem' ; and I direct that 
the receipt fiu- the auid s\iui if the Treasurer <f the (dxire-named Committee, shall con- 
stitute and be sufficient discJiarye therefor. 



Al'FENDlX L 
FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



HOME MISSION FUND, 18991900. 

Dr. Cr. 

Balance at Cr., April 1st, J899 $<jj;^ 01 

Presbytery of Quebec $2,H23 65 1,11.S \Vd 

*♦ Montreal 2,722 10 5,556 21 

" Glen-iiriy 1,509 79 

" Ottawa 2,876 70 2,249 42 

'• Lanaik Hud Renfrew 1,45175 2,648 40 

" Brockville 164 00 927 .•^7 

'• Kin«iHt..n 2,72;i 00 1,230 54 

" Peterborough 233 50 1,544 08 

" Lindsay 609 75 916 .35 

" Whiiby 770 42 

" Toronto 59100 7,480 88 

" Orangeville 156 00 561.34 

" Barrie ... 1,026 18 1,593 14 

•« North Bay 3,361 50 4.3(5 59 

" Owen Sound 557 00 845 42 

•' Saugeen 259 00 673 63 



19 



I'renliytory of ( iuelj»h 

" }|iimilt<>u 

A IgdlllH 

PtiriH 

London 

Clmtlirtiii 

Sarniii 

Stratford 

II uroii 

Maitlftiid 

Hruce 

Superior 

Winnipeg 

Rock Lake 

(iloaljoro 

Portaj^o la Prairie 

Brandon 

Minnudosa 

Melita 

Regina 

Calgary 

Kdmonton 

Kaniloops 

Koutenay 

WestniiniBter 

" Victoria 

Special payments, advance grants, etc 

Travelling expenses, Missionaries to N. VV. and B.C 

Salary and expenses, Missionaries to Klondike 

Rev. Dr. llobertson, salary and expenses. 

Rev. Dr. Findlay, salary and expenses 

Expenses Synodical H.M. Committee, British Columbia 

Proportion expenses Committee on Y.P. Societies 

Printing, including report. Blue Book, etc 

Interest on advances 

Expenses of Committee, Executive, etc 

Annuities and sundries 

Proportion general expenses 

Contri'^utions from Maritime Provinces, per agent at Halifax. 

■ ' " friends in Canada 

" " Great Britain and Ireland. .• 

Late Mrs. N. McTavish, South Mountain 

Late Mary J. Parsons, Caledonia 

Interest 

Transferred from Home Mission Special Fund 

Indebtedness, April Ist, P)00 , 



•< 
• t 
tt 

It 
«( 
ti 
tt 
it 



tt 
t« 
it 
it 
It 
tt 
it 
it 
tt 
it 
II 
11 
tt 



SllKt (M) 

17'-' <M) 

4.547 55 

104 m 

lit; MO 

Hlti 55 

70 00 



lO'J (M) 
1,;{50 (M» 

;{,i!n 00 

l,W2 00 
'27H (M) 

1,!>02 (H» 
HI 5 00 

1,!)08 00 

\,:mi 00 

5,;i25 00 
:!.74H 50 
4,4i;5 5)5 
:{,11>1 87 
:!.5.S7 50 

i,;{5;{ 25 

1,841 '20 

7'Mi 00 

4,!M7 10 

(),85H 10 

LM52 ;}5 

L,81J> 'Mi 

280 00 

;{5 00 
n»o 41 
;}!)() 41 

1,557 05 

201 '.M> 

1,200 00 



J2,:!:{5 4:? 

;{,8!»2 4:{ 

554 04 

2,2!«2 51 

.'{,720 !>7 



5;{ 

80 
21 
27 



10 
40 



857 
1,(M)1 
1,504 
1,257 
l,0!ti» 20 

584 40 

2;{0 
1,487 

040 8;{ 

i;{8 75 

287 

827 

258 

5:57 
:}44 

218 



5(i 
IN) 
25 
00 
80 
00 

yo 



[441) 
771 



15 

05 



m .'{o 



2,180 :v.) 

5,8(it) 55 

7,128 1)2 

100 00 

50 00 

721) 07 

8,4;n !);{ 

788 41) 



$81,041 ;?1) S81.041 ;}!) 






IMAGE EVALUATION 
TEST TARGET (MT-S) 




1.0 



121 



ISO 



1^ 



m m 



I.I 



■ 2.2 

!!? La |20 



IJ& 





m i^ m 




< 


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/A 



Hiotographic 

Sciences 

Corporation 



23 WEST MAIN STREET 

WEBSTER, N.Y. 14580 

(716) 872-4503 







"■1: 



»!l 



W 



• r- 



20 

Appendix III.— MISSION STATIONS. 
Report for the year ending March ,jJst, 1900. 

[N.K. The grantrt to fleldx marked * are for OrdHined MisHionarios.] 



Presbttrkies 

AND 

Mission Fields. 



s it 

0) B 

> * 



Y 

I.— ^>Mf6ec: ■ i 

1. •Chicoutimi....! 

2. Kast AiiKiiH, elcj l! 

3. Grande More...i i; 

4. *lAkeMeK»ntic: V 

5. *Marlow, etc... I 2' 

6. MaHHawippi.etc' 2 

7. 'Metis i 1 

8. Portneuf 

9. *Scot8towti ! 1 

10. Vnlcartier, etc.| 2 
U. Tiavelliiiar Ex! 

penKesof Mi8w.|.. 
-I 
Total Ill| 

ll.—Mo%itrcal :— \ 

1. *Avoca, etc 3 

2. DoSalaberry.etc 1 

3. *KariihaiTi 2 

4. *GreiiviUe 3 

n. Jolieltc 1 

ti. Kensington — 1 

7. La Prairie, etc. 1 

8. *Losl River .... 2 

9. MaiKoiineuve .. 1 

10. ♦MilloMes 2 

11. Montreal, An- 

nex, etc ! 1 

12. Montreal, WcBti 1 

13. St. Anne's, etc. .. 

14. Trout Kiver.etcl 1 

Total I20 

III.— Glennarry :-[ 
1. VVillianistown, , 

etc 1 



.1.2 

^^ ^ 



§1 



0*i 
QQ 



.30 

165 

50 

50 

90 

125 

100 

48 

3 % 

100 



26 



IV, 

1. 



4. 

5. 
6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 

10. 

11. 



I 



—Ottawa: 

*Aylwin | 1 

•Bearbrook, etc 

*Beir8 Corners, 
etc 

CuMSclnian, etc. 

•Desert 

•Kast, Temple- 
ton 

Glen Almond.. 

Lochabor 

"Onslow, etc — 

*PlantaKenet, 
etc 

•Portland, etc.. 



Total . 



-Lanark and 

Renjrew: 
*A.lice, fltc. . .. 

Bivthnrst 

CalaboKie — 



12 



853 



30 



18 



75 
73 
75 

115 
41 
45 
60 
62 
40 

150 

65 
65 

,50 
100 



s 

I 

a e 
^^ 

a" 
3- 



a 
g 

a 
9 

H 



s| 

a* 
-.2 

Sg 



301 10 
25: 12 



li 
3 
5 
4 
6 



23 
.53 
»l 
27 
81 
781 



Oh « tC 
OgB 



I 



363 89 



6' 62i 

2I 39 

2 40l 

4 112 



52 
49 
52 
52 
52 
,52 
52 
52 
52 
52 



48: 515 517 



50, 

16 

.56 



1011 



50 



75 



80 
65 
85 



.56 18' 
21 .... 
12 ... . 
•SI 1 
45i 4 

2(t:.... 

78| 6 

40 61 

20 ... . 
15 4 
29.. 



12i 



489 99 



.35 



50, 



140 

55 
75 



575 



31! 1 

.35i "8 

I 
50; ... . 



29j 2 

40.... 

isL.. 

2831 11 



81 
29 
55 
8« 
25 
12 
10 
.57 
20 
60 

43 

50 



4rK) 00 
276 00 
4.50 (K) 

:km) 00 

2(KI 00 
300 00 
300 (M) 
.300 00 
250 00 
185 00 



RKMARKS. 




.300 00 
117 00 
260 (Kl 
2tX) (H) 
325 OOJ 
156 (N) 

30(( mt 

78 00 



10 (M)i 

74 00 

25 OOi 

15 (H)i 

10 (Kli 

260 (K»| ' 5 OOl 

2.34 0(1 20 00 15 (N) 



5 76 
2 50 
5 OOl 

5 00||3 for Slu- 

6 25; [dent. 
2 50 

5 76 

Kor winter 



3&i 



2961 00 2323 «J5 208 00 117 (»(»! 00 .50 45 77 



1 ., 



14 



30 



558 



90 



l| 60 
"47 
49 



32 



21 42 

2' 90 

] 

8| 410 



,1 



31 225! 42... 16i 87 

2: 175; 45I 9i 3! 88 

2l 85l 33i 4 8 57 



52 
52 
52 
52' 



231 00 
115 00 

;i50 00 
430 on 

200 00 
100 (M)j . 
2:i5 00 
260 00 

400 m, . 

300 OOj 

182 Ooi 
.504 00, . 
260 00 

200 00 

r 



357 00 

208 (Ml 

:<50 00 

212 (Kl 
275 60 



136 50 

400 00 



375 00 
260 00 



I 



78 00 
70 00 



714 3767 001 2722 10 



47 500 (10 



52 327 00 

... 2mm 



.52 
52 
52 



52 



225 00 
208 00 
145 00 

280 00 



•M\-2 (10 



52! 

38 276 00 



350 



53 
63 
53 



2083 00 



300 00 
4,50 00 
285 00 



5 76 
2 2O1 



7 (Kl; 
3 85 



7 00! 

6 00' 

(i 73 

4 .50 

5 30, 



5 50 

5 00l 



350; 

7 701 



5771 


"e'ra 


500 

12 (Kl . 

5 00 

3 75 


500 

'306 
2 00 



(Ml 3:{ 57 46 



3(10 00. 
260 Oo|. 

228 00 
208 00 
300 00 

300 00 
42 00 



300 00 

300 00 
138 76 

2876 76 



300 00 
20(1 00 
1&5 ,50 



9 (i2 



7 70 5 77 

8 .5(1 5 00 

7 7o| 5 77 

7 (Kl, 4 fKI 

4 OOJ 5 77 

7 70i 5 77 



6 73! 5 77 

I : 

6 73i 5 77 

6 .50 6 73! 



-I 



62 58 50 35! 



6 (Kl 5 75i 
8 H5| 3 8ft 
3 .5(1 3 .ill 



• i.' 



SI 



Appendix— MISSION STAT10JH8.— Continued. 



Prbbrttkribb 

AND 

.Mission Fields. 



•Chalk Kiver, 

etc 

Killaloe 

Iiiinark 

Madawanka. . . 
Kockliffe 



y. Stafford 
Total. 



VL— Hrockville ; 

1. Morton 

2. Stone's Corners. 

Total 



2. 
3. 
4. 

o. 
(!. 
7. 

8. 

a 

10. 

II. 

12. 

1.1. 

14. 
l.i. 



3 
M 

Si 

« 

Ml ^ 

u c 
« o 

> * 



5 
1 

h 
|.i 




1 



Is 



11 



12 



1 
2 

Iffl 



^\l.— Kingston : 

1. Carlow II 

Coni«econ i 2, 

DemoroHtville. . h 

Deseronto West 2j 

Kmetitown — 4| 

•L'Amable 2 

Matawatchan.. 1 

Maynooth l| 

•Poland 

•Portsmouth . . . 
"Sharbot Lake . 
St. John's, Pitts- 
burg 1] 

Thanet 3' 

Wilbur I 2 

Wolfe IsUnd. .11 



140 
8ig 

60 
100| 

MO! 



521 

'25| 



10' 21 ft% 
15 31 15 



52 347 00 400 00 

34 go 50; 50 00 

«B2d 



81. 
32, 

237 



20 
65 

85 



J. 
43! 



2 18, 23 00: 

5i 38 53 27(i 50 250 00 



36, 




J'' 



7 OO 



6 00 Kor winter 

12 001 OrK. Feb. 

I j llllh, 190O, 



7 111 6 25i 



I 
si 8l» 50 



11 



:i52 



52 



31tt| 1781 00 



208 00 
236 00 



1451 75 . 



6 ig 102! 94 444 00 



3 120; 30 

2 105, 32 

1! 80 30! 

2l 250 lOO: 

4| 140 71 

4i 80' 57 

2: 66 

2; «0 

6 147 

2 KK) 

3 140 



25' 



94 00[. 
70 00'. 

ICJ ()0 



5 !t 
25 19 

!» 
10 



31 120' 

48' 



37 
18 
60 
41 
70 



43 
47i 
59' 
90 
70 
62 
98 
70: 
H 



1 150' 36 

3 3.'i 311 

(i 114, 44' 

3 lOO! 36 



20' 6o; 

1' 60. 



461 



24 

36 

52. 

47! 

32 
52 
2(t> 
30 
52 
521 
52| 

52 
2li 
33! 
52 



90 00 
12!) 00 

38.5 66! 
440 OOl 
273 no 
145 00 
l.i3 00 
340 00 
4(10 00, 
400 001 

300 00 
129 ai 
IfiO 00 

:«i8 00 



72 00 

90 (10 

24 00! 

94 0(1 

312 (K) 

312 00 

♦i7 (10 

9!» (Kt! 

3.1(1 50 

350 50 

312 00{ 

250 Oo' 
78 (N) 
(i2 (I0{ 

250 60 



aoool 

13 (N): 



44 26 33 05 



4 50l 
4 00; 



2 00 
1 50 






8 00, 3 50 



9 75 3 00' 
13 OOl 3 50 

' 6 00. . 



3 50 
2 50 



15 601 
5 00, 



11 60j 

3 00 



•7a!: 



I 

v> oo; 15 00 

32 «8| 1« 72 
5 00 



8 88 
6 00' 
3 m 
3 00 

6 75 

7 70 



Total 24 41'1707 



.1— 



VIII. -Peter- 
borough : — 

1. Cardiff, etc 

2. Clydesdale 

3. Lakehurst 



Total 3 



693 103 Vf.V 929, 638 .3652 00 2723 0(1 20(1 63 



3 00: 


7 70 


20 00 
2 (Ht 
5 50 
5 0(( 


5 76 

3 (K) 

4 0(1 

6 74 


98 ,57, 


7.i ai 



2 00| 

6 iO|92.forSunv- 
6 00 [iner. 

3 (lo; 

3 OOl 
6 75| 
6 75| 
6 00 



33 00, 20 00 5 76 4 80' 

4 50 2 (Ht 3 (Xt 3 (H) 

9 75 5 .50 4 00 2 00 

21 35 5 00 6 74 4 80 



.59 60 



100 32 
108: ... . 
120j 15 

3.13! 67 



12 9 



.58 
66 



12 

27 
2t» 



:«i (HI 
,52 (HI 
104 (HI 



:«! (10 

Si ,50 
III* (Ml 



124 68 140 00 228 .5(1 




\X.~WhHbv.- 



No Mission Stations 



XI 

1. 

4. 



-lAadsay:— 
Coboconk . . . 
•Haliburton. 
Sebright 

Total 

.— Toronto:— 

('hoster.. 

Kairbank... 

Malton 

Port Credit . 
(JueciiKvillc . 
Swansea . . . 

ToUl 



2 
3 
2 


2 
4 
4 


200 
140 
155 


.59 
79 
40 


•> 
4 


3 
4 


45 
l(i" 
67 


51 
52 
51 


."Wl (Ml 
238 (HI 
255 00 


7 


10 


495 


178 


J 


7; 272 


1.54 


793 no 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

6 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

6 


.^5 


18 


3 


2 


19 


53 
.53 


190 00 
270 00 


130 


35 


4 


7 


41 
















.50 
215 


16 
6!( 


19 
26 


11 


38 


53 


180 00 


21 


98 


159 


640 00 



217 75 

•j(Wt no 

■ I (12 00 
609 75 



1(18 00 

1.56 00; 

76 00 

108 00 



5 7 
5 77 
7 70 



25 00 



i:45 00 
.58:4 00 



25 (HI 



19 24 



5 (Nl 

5 (HI 

6 00 



; 00 



23 00 



5 75 
5 00 
2 00 



12 75 



4 00 
3 00 



7 00 



t1 



lH-.lL 



AiM'KM.ix- MISSION STATIONS. — r(»i<in./erf. 



Wrt 




Prbsbttkkiks 

AND 

Mission Kikldh. 



Kll. —Oratiiiet'iUe 
1. 'Corbet toil 2i 



RRMARK8. 



XllL- Barn e:- , 

1. Hala, Ptc ' 3; 

2. 'BayMvillc, etc . 3 

3. FrHiikliii 

4. Kil worthy .... 

i). Mcdonte 3 

ti. MinesiiiK ] 3 

7. Muskoka Kails. 1 

8. Port .Sydney . . 

9. WashaiJCO 

10. VVindormore... 1 
U. Wyovale 3 

Trav. KxpuiiHCH 
ofMlHMionaries 

Total ,..;•» 

XIV. - North Hau: 
t. AlKonquiii 

2. AHpdiii ; 2! 

3. Bonfluld 

1. ByiiK Inlet 1 

5. "Cullender 

6. Cai'lini; 

7. Conimanda 

8. Depot Harbor..;.. 

9. Kmsdaie 3 

10. Kr«noh liivt'V ... 

11. Katrine 1 

12. Kippcwa 

13. Loring 2 

II. Madawaska. . 

15. 'MaKnctawan 

16. MattawH 2i 

IT.'Orrville (Conger: 2 

18. I<aven.i worth .. 

19. ' Uos.'<ean 

20. South Uiver... 

21. Hpence 

22. Sprucedalc 

23. Sturgeon Falls. 

21, 'Sundrldge 

25. TeiniHcaniiigiiei 
2K. Warren ' 2 

Total 38 



XV.- Owen Sound 

1. Caven 1 

2. Indian Penin-i 

miluL ' 3 

3. "Lion's Head ...| 3 

4. Williamsford . . i 1 
;'). Johnston, etc. 

Total ' 8 




X Vl.—Sauueen : — 

1. Cedaiville 1 2 

2. Mildmay 2 

Tolfll I 4 4 1 375; 97i 111 7l 186i 97 7.37 00 JW tH) 3 00 17 00 6 00 



■■^-^«!5 



28 



Api'em.ix -MISSION STATIONS.— tVmtin !(«(<. 



Presbtteriks 



AND 



Mission Fields. 



M) 



2 * 



i 



« s 



XVII.-0«efp/t:- 
1. hiviiiKKtone, 
Baden 



XVIII. --.-l/j/oma 

1. BilliiiKs 1 

2. *Bruco MinuM . 

3. (^hapleau 

4. 'ChelmHford ... 1' 
.^ Cockburn iNl'nd . 
)i. Collin'4 Inlet. . 1..; 
7. -Day MilU 3; 



1 

8.1 



2^ 



o « 

8) 






00 



!^ 

i o 

I .a 






"OCO 

g-ce 
eg* 



Ob's 

0.S9 

JS.S 

CO r*^ 

•B .J 



O b tf tC 

B£a.s 



ill 

^ o.S » 
►».S 2 



. 



-I 

8^ 



ll 



11 1 



All 



9(1 
1311 



8. •Denharai.K . 

9. Kcho Bay . . 
10. Gore Biy... 



«t 10(1 

21 6li 

I 5(1 

41 mi 

3 17(1 

4i 9:^ 

41 14(1 



11. OoulaiHBty.. 

\i. Hillon 3 

n. Iron BridKe .... 1 

14. Korah 1.. 

15. 'Little Current.: 1 
Iti. 'Little Rapid8 .j 2 

17. 'ManitowaninK' '■i 

18. MaHsey , 2 

19. "Michlpicolon 



12! 9 



a(ti . . . . 
521 7 



52i 25 
251 5 



55 



2 21 
:{l 1(1 



55 ll 41 8(1 



5()l 4,. 
22: 1 
45i 45i 



31' 

27 
9H 



20. Mill>4 

21. Mt. Nickel 

22. Ophir 

2:1 Hroviaence Bay 

24. Richard'H Land 

ing 

25. Rock Luke 

30. Silver Water... 

27. South B»\y 

28. 'Spanish Rivei 
2!). SpragKP 

30. Squaw Inland . . 

31. White Kihh .... 
.'<2. Barrie Island . . 
'Si. Duck Inland — 

Special Clainiri 
Trav. Kxpenger' 
of Misslonario 



2; 0(1 

4 12.5 

4 175 

2 135: 35 

2 12(li 40 

4 140 3)i 
175 40 



90 
40 



100 



130 

180 



10 



30 



2 22 

.. 49 

.. 53 

.. 58 

1 55 

4 .55 

9 8-1 

..! 35 



■!•••• 



301 



43 
45 



3 15(t 

3I 80 

3| 1901 46 

4 17(» 40 
1 50i 18 



52 



52 
52 



530 00 104 00 49 00 



135 00 
359 731 



1.56 00 
a50 00 . 



51 

231 



52 

261 

52j 

4l{ 

52 

:{4i 

oil 

52 
2(i! 

.Ti 
521 
.521 
52 
26 
16 



341, 



119 151 

12 .5"' 



:ko 00 

24 00 



1 



.0 

s 

8^ 

scii 

•«5 






(^4 



10 00 



^. 



a S I 

ll 

< 



o 

u 
CD 



15 



S IS 

a 

o 



RRMARK& 




I I 

7 (Nil 2 OOl 



4 UOI 
7 21 



3 .171 

4 001 



:m (Kii 3,50 00 . 



103 (Hll 

185 IK) 
197 68; 

151 (Nil 

186 m 

155 00! 

,84 00: 
250 OOj 
222 20! 

30('» (»: 

75 (H)l . 
98 (Nil . 



48 (Nl . 
208 (N). 
215 52 . 

87 n> . 

78 (Nl . 
208 (Nl . 

96 INi; . 
208 (Nl . 
.350 (Nl 
;i.50 (Nl . 



6 00 

8 65 
4 (Nl; 

7 70i 



33 00. 



5 INI 
,j (Nl 
7 70 

6 73 
6 73 
5 (N) 



31 10! 

:«! 3 



10 
lOi 

.30^ 
2dl III;. 



35 



3 93| 

..! 36| 

3i 48' 

2 43 

1 15 

. .^ 25 

ii"ii; 



461 

48l 

36 
41 

4(! 

;«i 

.52 

311 
16 
26 



Totals 36 



XlX.-Hnmilton: 
1. Port RobiuHOn 



XX.—Paria :— 
1. OnondaKa . . . 



\Xl.~f.onilnn: - 
1. North Kkfiirt 



XXl\.-( hntham: 

1. Benlpatli 

2. Hiixton 



97 3318 990 1.50 



228 (Nl 
221 (Nl 

250 00 
93 IK) 
128 00 
100 (Nl 
360 IHI 
31 87j 

iio OOl' 



16( 00 . 
170 (Nl . 
t 
160 22' . 
123 (N) 

i:i8 00 



5 00| 
5 (Ml. 
5 00! 

673! 

5 (Nl 
5 (Nl 



3 00; 
6 25 
1S.M.8. 

.5 .30 

3 IN) 

S.M.S. 

/ 6 73; 

I 4 iNijKor Appr. 

.5 771 [CatecHt. 

3 00; 

jTrauH. to 

i [Aug. liht 
.. .|.S..VI.8. 
i.S.M..S. 

4 (N): 
3 01(1 

5 77 

6 73 

6 73 
3 00 

7 7(l|l''orfimthH. 

: PrcHb, to 
I report. 

'•'.M.S. 

3 OOi 

3 (Nl 

4 00 



6 731 

3 (Kl 
3 On 



8. M.S. 



260 00 . 
66 (Nl,. 



11 1 



r 3 105 



3 •Harrow 11 2i 92 



129.76| 

111 5.5I. 



6 92 
5 00 



5 INI 
3 (N) 



i.x.M.S. 
IS. M.S. 

Is. M.S. 
SMS. 



.5;ni88113(i 4458 13 4.547 55 



40 


17 




50 


15 


4 


78 


35 


5 



40 



49 






30 



*>' 32 



46 



42 



52 



4 (19 ■5-.' 



3 52' 52 



81 



124 741100 71 



r 



168 (Kl 172 (Nl 



250 OOl 1(14 INI 



'28.3 (Nl 116 (HI 



28(1 OOi I5t (Kl 
. . . . 78 (XI 

.500 09 175 (N) 



4 (N)| 4 (NJ 



.1 6 (Nl 2(1(1 



3 251 4 0(1; 

I 3 00 b'or winter 

10 OOi 3 00 






• 



.1? 

;vj ; 
I ♦ - 

■I' ' ■» 



■I':.f; 



24 



Ai'PKNi.ix -MISSION .STATIONS.— 0<m«m««i. 






'li 









I'KB8BTTKKIKS 

AND 

MiSHION KlULDH. 



1^ 

s a 



1 

8s; 
ll 



I. "Morpelli 

5. •Piico i 

(!. South Hiirth ....' 
Trtiv. KxpensoH, 
of MiaaionarioH' 



|l 

8) 



5t3 

OQ 



TotftI 



XXIlI.-Sarwia:-! 
1. Sotnbra 2 

;;2. St. John'H I 

Tnt Hi ... I 3 



3 150 .id 
3 09 47 
3 110 50 



U| 586, 236 



I i 
2: 125' 40 

1! 1241 23 
I 




■d 

I 
3 



See 

8 Si 

B e 



I 









^1- 



Ifi 

00 1^^ 



^ fc*» 00^ 



SbSec 
-58.5 



I 



10 8 :<u .vi 

3' 1 86: 52 



201. 



13 52 



67 17 268 260 



36; 73 48 

I 



m 73 97 




RRMAKK8. 



lO.'i (HI 127 00 

:i07 (HI 2(H) (H) 

m (H) 52 (H) 



•I 



9 80 



1.188 00 795 80 



324 00 70 (H) 

119 7.5 

443 -a 70 00 



8 (tt 2 89 
2 00 7 (HI 3 M 
5 (M) 3 (N) 



2 00: 33 90 19 74 



(winter. 
5 (Ml / 1 (10(2 for 
i 1 3 ()0| Kor O.M. 



5 (H) 2 .V)l 



XXlV.-StrcU/ord No Miasion Stationn. 



XXy.- Huron: 



No Mi^Kion StntionR. 



XXVl.—Maitland No Mifision Slalioim. 

i 



XXVIL- Bruce:- 

1. Salem 1 

1 


3 

6 


150 


75 
43 


15 


' 


130 


61 

1 

19^ 

47 

.52 

35 

44 
44 
26 
21 
52 

62 

429 


526 (M) 

78(H) 
248(H) 

"ins o() 

14(1 (HI 
254 (HI 
376 (H) 

.539 0(1 

280 00 

21(H) (Kl 


102 00 
90 00 




. ... 10 11 

i > 
1 1 


[Auk. list 
Trans, lo 


XXyiU.-Superior 
1 Roucher*'ille .. .1 . . 




i 
1 

.... 


6 00 4 0(1 




2 Oainu Bav 


7 



40 
44 




5 (HI 
h 0(1 


New Field 


3. i)ryden 

4. *Emo 1 

5. Kort Frances...! 1 


4 


127 
115 

90 

"85 
120 


42 
46 
33 
14 

7 


18 

;« 

30 


23.5(H) 

101 (H) 

.•M (K) 

.50 (Ml 

2; (HI 

130 (Kl 

.52 (K) 

118 (Ml 

i ld(> 00 
ia50 (H) 




j 


8 (H) 


[.Min.c'mp 


(i 0(1 
10 (H) 
15 (Kl 


2 (HI 

4 (HI 

1(1 (Kl 


8 00; 5 (H) 
8 (Kl! 5 (Kl 
5 (HI 2 (HI 

8 (Hi; 1 00 

9 00| i 00 


7. Mikado 




S MineCBiitre ...;. 










*) ^Jornmti ..'. 





















10 Sawbill 1 . 








40 

7 

145 








::::;:::;::: 


4 00 

4 (H) 

3 (HI 


Min'nKand 
"Railw'y 
L camps 


11. -Schreiber : 

12. West Fort 

William 5 


.... 

1 16 
! 3 
r 61 


165 
101 

8o:i 


70 

37 

292 


3 
17 


30 
33 

182 


105 (HI 
9 00 


(»3 00 
7 60 


10 00 
fi 25 


Total ' 


145 00 


70 60 


(57 25i 42 (HI 

1 




! 

XXlX.-iVinniiiefi 

1. HeauHojour 

2. Clandeboye 

:». Clear Springs .. 


4 

3 

1 3 

4 

2 

? 4 
4 

5 


70 

70 

125 

!.')(> 

(18 




21 


4 

2 

11 


17 
27 
48 
51 
9 


.52 
52 
.52 
.52 
52 


92 0( 
234 (H 

479 0(1 

20 (N 

188 0( 


2(H1 (HI 

SI 2 00 

1.5li (Nl 

2(1 (H) 

: .52 00 


i 


4 00 4 00 

5 (HI 6 (H) 


. 


5S 

15 


4 
11 

1 


9 0(1 2 00; 


i 


9 (HI .. 


.5. HeadiiiKly 

(i. Lake Winnipeg 




4 (Kl 1 00 




1 
1 




n no 




7 T.ift.ln Hritain 


250 
40 
90 


fin 

48 


5 


.57 


100 


52 
45 
.50 

1 


450 0(1 

72 (K 

312 0( 


242 00 

1.54 (HI 

, 100 (Kl 


1 


12 00 




8. Lnndyville 

9 Oakville 




7 00 3 (Hi: 


26 




34 






(! (K) 
600 


2 (HI 
2 00 


- 


10 Prairie Grove.. . 






New Field. 














1 26 

: 22 
49 

52 




1 104 00 

19(i (HI 
■ 312 00 










1 

1 4 

1 


m 

126 

20 


10 

5:1 

4 


■■■5 




"is 

12 


208 (H 






3 00 

4 00 


"4 00 




1!1 ^HAinn 








14 Selkirk 






Icplandcrs. 



















25 



Ai'i'KNDix— MISSION STATIONS.— Conhnnerf. 






■ ( • 



Prkbrttrrirs 



AND 



MiSfllON KiBLDH, 



'i. dlni'buck 

If). 'Stony Mouii 

tall) 

17. Sluartbuni 

IS. SmiDyeido 

lit. Siilhyn 

20. Willi ohavoii 
•.'I. Whitemouth... 
tl. Win 111 peg, 

Beverly St... 
•>:i. Winnipeic, 

Icelandic 
24. ImmiKralion 

Mi8i%ion 

Total |12 



\XX.-Rock Lake: 

1. Kellalleld 

2. Belmont 

:{. Cart Wright 

I. Glenora 

5. Huntley 

*i. Mather 

7. Mountain City. 

8. Ninga 

9. Plum Coulee 

10. Riverside 

11. Rosebank 

12. Snowflake 
V.i. Swan Lake 



Total 



XXXI.-Olenboro 

1. Kgremont 

(Bates) 

2. Indianford 

3. Nesbitt 

4. Ravenswood 

Total 



XXXII.- Portage 
Im Prairie :- 

1. Arden 

2. Ethel bert 
'.i. Glenlyon 
4. Macdonald 
.\ Meadows 
fi. Mekiwin 

7. Minitonas 

8. Ochre River. 
it. Pine Creek 

10. Swan River 

11. Sylvester... 
12 Umatilla 
IX Westbnrne 
14. Valley River 



ToUl 



XXXIII.- 

Brnndon 

1. Arrow River 

2. Griswold 




2G 



Appkni»ix— MISSION STATIONS.— CVm^iuued. 




ti 



RKMAKKa 




PliB8HYTKKIK8 



AND 



MlHHION KlELDB. 



3. Hai'Krave 
1. Mayiie 
5. Petrel 
R. Plperttone . 

7. ReKton 

8. Tarbolton 

Total 

XXXIV.- 

Minnedo8a:— 

1. ArK^ le 

2. Beavordale. . 

3. Doukhobors . 

4. Uiiiileitli 

5. Lumber CampH 

6. Millwood 

7. Oswald ' 1 

8. Otthon 

9. RoriRburn 

10. Saltcoats 

11. Shell River 2 

12. Shoal I ake 

13. Strathclair 
11. Upper AsHiiii 

Doine 

Total 



XXXV.-Melita: 

1. Alameda 

2. Areola 

3. Broomlnll 

4. Carndulf 

5. Rstevaii 
(i. Oleii Morris 

7. Lennox ' 4 . 

8. Oxbow 

9. Pierson 

10. WaHhada i 3 

11. Whitewater 

Total 



XXXVI.- Regina: 

1. Abernethy 

2. KatKoniH 

3. Battleford. 

4. Broadview . . . 

5. Buffalo Lake. 

6. Collesion 

7. (Cottonwood. . 

8. Duck Lake . 

9. ElteHboro .... 

10. Ksterhazy 

11. KairliKht 

12. Fairmede i 1 

13. KleminK 2; 

14. FortQn'.\ppt'llel 

15. Greendyke !.. 

16. Grenfell 1 1 



40 
100 

40i 
41 95 
0| 180' 
31 147i 
3; 300' 
3 tR); 
51 138! 



.39 


81 18 


60 


52 


26 


81 3 


34 


43 


22 


12 1 


32 


46 


60 


12i 10 


75 


52 


62 


17 2.i 


122 


52 


52 


15, 5 


37 


52 


3l» 


10 ... 


1" 


35) 


;« 


6 16 


65 


52 



14 no: 

m .39 00 15 00 
001, 
00;... 
m 286 00 51 00' 30 00 



If 



A iTEM.ix- MISSION STATIONS. -r.^i^H ./*>(/. 



I ■ 



PRB0BTTKKIB8 



AND 



MI8HION KiBLDg. 



17. Highvlew 
l«. Hinbiirii .... 
I<). Kinistino... 
21). Ix>iiKlaketon 

21. Melford 

22. Milextone 

•a. Ohlon 

24. ParklandH 

Poplar Grove 

Oil AvpoUe 

KOHC Plain 

Saskatoon 

Sintaluta ; 1! 

:<(). .Summeroide ...I 
M. Sunny Lynn... 1 

;V2. Wapella 1 2 

Xi Weybiirn 



•JO. 

•2rt. 

27. 
28. 
20, 



M. WillouKhby 

Total 30i 

XXXVII,- 

Calffary 

1. Banff 

2. Bow River 
Cardslon 
Cochra.ie. , 
DavisdurK 

Foothills 

Oleichen 

Oraburn 

Maple Creek . . . 
Mountain View 
Okotoks I 2 

12. Pincher Creek . 
IS. Porcupine Hills 

14. Spring Creek . . 

15. Swift Current . 



3. 
4. 

5. 
t). 
7, 
8, 
9, 

10. 

11 



Total 



XXXVIII- 

Kdmonton :— 
Beaver Lake. .. 

Belmont 

Kort Saskat- 
chewan 
■.lo.scphsbiirg 
Laconibe 
Lamerton 

7. Leduc — 

8. -Olds 12 

!). Ked Deer 1 

Id. Scandiiiavian(l) 

11. Scaiidinaviaii(2) 

12. Stony Plain .... 

13. Swan Lake 

14. VVetaskiwin....| 2 
Outlying Pointsi 



1 

•) 

4. 

5. 



XXXIX. - 

K'lmloopa :— 

1. Awhcrofi 

2. Barkerville 
H. Field 




'1^ 



Total 16 



' 



28 



A I'i'ENi.ix— MISSION STATIONS.— CV.n<in««rf. 



- 



Prehbttbriks 



AND 



MI8HION VlKLDB. 



4. Goldoii 

5. HorHefly 
«. IllecillewHut 

7. Kelowna 

(OkanaKan) . . 

8. Lillooet 

'9. I'Uniby 

W. Nloola 

North Bund .... 
North Thom'Mon 

tuoHiiello 
aliiioii Ann... 

Trout Lake 

Special ClHima. 




11 

12. 

13. 

14. 

15. 



Totol 



Xh.—Kootenay :— 

1. Ainsworth 

2. CfinipM'Kiniiey 

5. CaHoade 

4. Coliiinbin 

6. Craii brook 



6. Bholt .. . . 

7. Fairview. 

8. Fernie... 



9. Fort Steele.. . 
la Grand ForkA. 



11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23, 
24. 



Greenwood... 

Jjardo 

Michel 

Midway 

Moyie 

Nelson 

Now Denver . 
Phoe'x (Summit) 
RosHland Mines 

Sandon 

Slocan 

UpperColumbia 
Whitewater.. 

Ymir 

Uxploration . . 



Total 



Xhl.-West- 

■r '■"• tninater:— 

1. Bai nett 

2. "Delta 

3. Fairview 

4. "Haney 

5. "Langley 

6. Mission 

7. Mt. Lehman.. 

8. 'Surrey 

9. Texada 

Yukon :— 
1, Atlin 



2. Bennett 



SO 



88 
76 
30 
80 



531 



80 
35 
50 
30 
119 



100 



00 
100 



50 
148 
93 
185 
00 
55 
90 
44 
35 



57;133i 



140 
147 
125 

70 
110 
230 

50 



19 

40 

8 

13 

33 



311 



40 
13 
10 
10 



18 
60 

7 

18 

8 



265 



30 
13 

« 

8 

26j 40 



30 



35 
45 



10 
28 
27 
19 

5 
25 
19 
20 

8 



376 



58 
39 
75 
31 
55 
70 
40 



50 



20 
50 



75 

400 

30 

500 



1286 



16 
2 
25 
13 
16 
6 
50 



19 



33 



26 
3 



2 
37 



156 



12 
10 
10 
20 



29 



35 
40 



12 
25 



16 
24 



52 
4.1 
23 
52 
35 



511 



51 
52 
52 
23 

50 



50 



46 
46 



20 
43 
46 
42 
9 
.'>2 
52 
25 
40 



238i 699 



34 .50 
m .52 
55 31 



29 
30 
54 
37 



52 
52 
52 
40 



418 00 
241 45^ 
46 00 
286 00: 
13900! 



300 00 
210 00 
60 00 
477 00 
200 00 



2912 15 



410 00 
240(0 
443 75 
227 75 
210 40 



27 52 
3070 87 



115 00 
359 00 
333 75 
115 00 
92 40 



338 00 



483 75 



150 00 
180 00 
276 00 
333 00 

55 00 
677 70 
480 00 

57 00 
113 00 



4675 35 



428 00 
300 00 
:{85 00 
.351 00 

aai 00 

4:13 00 
210 00 



120 00 



192 50 
116 00 



120 0(t 
288 00 
313 50 
205 00 

54 00 
150 00 
410 00 
1.50 IH) 
183 00 
350 20 

29 60 



3667 50 



42 00 
230 00 
245 00 

200 00 

m 00 

2(iO 00 

280 00 



RKMAUKH. 



36 001 25 tNI 



9 OOi 9 00 



17 00| 74 00 

T 



800 



17 50 
2 (N)! 
25 00: 21 00 



15 00 



M IM) 



15 00 



93 50 44 00 



7 00 
5 00 
500 



») 00 
3 00 



7 00 
5 00 
5 00 



10 00 



8 65 
6 00 



7 OOi 
7 701 
6 00! 



8 50 
7 (Ml 
3 50 

6 77 

7 00 



5 77 
4 OOi 
2 00! 
900' 
7 OOi 
7 00, 



67 17 92 25 



5 00 

4 75 

600 

10 00 



10 00 



10 00 



7 70 



12 00 

10 00 

5 00 



80 45 



10 00 

6 50 

11 50 
665 

7 00 
800 
7 «) 



500 
(> 00 
6 (X)! 

5 00 New Field. 
OnAuK-list 

Oct. l.W. 

6 OOlNew Field. 



600 



600 



600 
4 81 
600 
4 81 
600 
600 



600 

3 85 

4 81 

5 00 
600 



105 28 



1 50 



23 10 



14 50 



New Field. 
Self Supp. 

Oct. 1, '99 
New Field. 
OnAug.list 

Ap. 1.1900 
Self Supp. 
New Field. 
New Field. 
New Field. 



Self Supp. 
[Ap.1,1900 



New Field. 
Trans, to 
[Aug. list 



S.M.S. in 
[summer 



People to 
pay S25 
per m'th. 

flOOm'thly 
for 3mth 
S.V) after. 



29 






A iTENux— MISSION STATIONS. -CkmtinHed. 



\i 



rKKHHYTKKIICS 

AND 
MlHHION KiKLtM. 



3. Kldorado .. .. 

4. Pine City 

5. ThoCreelcH — 
.White HorKo 

(CloHuluiKh) 



e 
5f| .2 



■«' 3 



1 



J 



9 

V a 



si 






|3 

•a 



|; 

3— 



1^ 



1* 

S _' 

■an 



11^ 
111 

I III 



BOSfl 



s « 












lil. 



Total 



10 -M 



XLlh- Victoria :- 

1. A.lberni 

2. L.edarHill.... 

3. CheiiinlneH . . . 



1. Clayoquot 

■i. Doiiiiiiin Island. 
(!. KiiKlixlinianV 

River 

7. KxtoiiHion 



8. North Held. 



!». Fender Inland . . 

111. Sooke and Col' 

wood 



Total 



2j 3 
9I '22 



872 3(» 128 



68 275 319! 2468 (I0{ 1:153 (Ml! WW) 27 00 



110 38 27 16 .TOi .Vi «8(» 00 312 (X) 
1«I0 65; 20| 5 58| r,2, MH Oo! -2510 00 



50 

.52 
1» 



37 

28 
15 



67| 25 
3^1 27 
40! 20 



34 
14 

n 

20 
5 



532 255 134, 33 

I I I 



U 

20 

16 

16 

26 

215 



49 106 00 

52 125 00 

281 170 00 

52I 270 00 

43 247 00 

481 213 85 



376 2063 85 



560 
188 55 

156 00 
261 00 

200 00 

252 55 

200 70 



1841 20 



1 



C^ B 

o 



RKMAHKH. 



5 77 

5 7; 

2:1 10 

23 10 



KorHtiid'nt 



56 70124 40 



9 50| 6 00 
11 50! 5 00| 



600 

500 

600 



500 



5 OOlJoin'dwith 
Mt.8icl<er 
& Oywter 
Harbor. 

6 00 Now Field. 
385 

500 

3 85Join'dwith 
S.Well'Kn 
Join'dwith 
Wel'nut'u 

385 



5.00 3 85 



48 00: 42 40 



'i1 



i J . 



i;! 



I ' 



= ■■ 



?8.- 



Appkndix.— SUMMARY OF MISSION STATIONS. 



If fi,i 



I. 





i 



91 B. -O "^ t « .: • 



f'KESBVTKKIRH. 



■i', .Si 

S' ill 

1\ Si 
s -O: 
41 u. 



m 

CO 

u 

3 



1 Quebec 10 

2 Montreal 14 

3 (ilenKArry 1| 

4 Ottawa 10| 

6 Ijanark and 1 

6 Brock vllle ! 2^ 

7 KingBton 15 

8 Peterborough . . 'A 

9 Whitby ... 

10 LindHay 31 

11 Toronto I «| 

12 Orange vllle.... I 1 

13 Barrio | 111 

14 North Bay '» 

la Owen Sound.. . 4< 

16 Saiigeen °J 

17 OuoTph I 

18 Algoma j 3:11 

I 1 
1 

' 
2 



17 

20 

1 

12| 

12] 
24 

:< 



30 

1 

18 

10 

til 
44> 



5 

i 

h 

V a 
> « 

< 



I 

s . 

as 
8£ 

is 

•at 'C 



'■5 



I. 



'" §2 

-" a 



•8^ 

IS 

5S 



w B 

I- 



5.ao 
iSg.H 

.a ^2 

O b « b( 

■< 



.tS.S S 

Hit 



ll 

II 

il 



Is 1 


m!|^< 




"•i 


■z 


5?:- 


a 


iS- 


JO 


.fl2= 


u 


c^ea 


t con 
Fund. 


il'i 

B S S 

lit' 


s . 




< 


< 






8S3 

1011' 

5UI 

6761 

810 

220 

1707 

33:1 



303 m 

18» m 

36i....]. 

283i 11 

237 13 

86 6 

(H)3 Wi 

(17 10', 



18 
14 



546 

558 



8 410 



617 

714 

47 



30 
101 
03I 



3.V2 3111 

102 01. 

029 641 

... 41 



•mi 00 

3707 110 

600 00 

■J08:{ <NI 

1781 110 
444 00 

3<»2 INI 
140 00 



'III 
•.>:«3 116 208 00117 IH» 60 .50 16 77 

•.'7J-' 10 , III) s;4 .57 46 

i 962: 

2:n(! 76i I II 50' « 73 



1461 75j, 
IIVI OOi, 

2723 00 
2:« 61) 



84 60 

7 00 



46 86! 



44 26) :i3 06 

8 00: 3 61) 
76 03 60 60 

9 IN) !l IN) 



19 Hamilton 

20 Paris 

21 Ix>ndon .. 

22 Chatham, 

23 Sarnia . . . 

24 Stratford 
26 Huron . . . 

26 Maitland 

27 Bruce — 

28 Superior , 

29 Wliinijpcg 24 

.30 Rock Lake 13 

31 Glonboro j 4i 

32 Portage la 

Prairie 14 

33 Brandon 8 

34 MiniiedoHa : 14 

35 Melita 11' 

36 Ucgina .34 

37 Calgary 15, 

38 F^dmonton 14| 

39 Kamloops 16{ 

40 Kootcnay 23| 

41 Westminster . . 15j 

Victoria lOi 

Expenses Brit. 
Columbia H.M. ! 

Committee 

ExpenseH Man. 
and N.W. H.M. 
Committee 



10 

2 

3« 

77! 

lOi 
4 

li 
92i 

11 
II 
li 
14 
3 



495; 

216! 

175' 

1672 

31)27 

l!16 

375 

60 

33I81 

40 

60 

76 

686 

249 



4-: 



12 
10 

4; 

8 
6 

t 

9 
311 
14 

Ifi 

8 
!l 
8 
9 



3 
61 

68' 
401 

6l 

66 
23 

:« 

14 
125 
61 
iiO 
50 
57 
20 
22 



1781 6; 

69 26 
.581 

545: i08 

802 347 

118 4 

97 11 

17 9 

990 160 

17 ...., 

15 4 

.^5 6 

231! 67 

63 1 



7: 

» 

32 
62, 
23 

7' 

3' 

63 

2 



4 

17 

361 



2721 

98, 

90' 

656; 

992, 

274I 

186 

27! 

1188 

62 

46 

69 

268; 

73i 



164j 7ft3 00: 1109 76 

169 610 00 .583 00' ' 26 00 

.52 SM 00 1.5li 01) 

4(111 26:17 HI 1112(1 18 ioo IH) .38 IN) 

llOl! .5594 Oil 3;«ll .50 38;< :«278 40 

156 961 IN) .5.57 IN) 12 110 3:< IN) 

97 7.37 00 2.59 IN) 3 00 

52 ,5.30 00 104 OU 49 IN) 111 IN) 

11361 44.58 13 l.)47 .55 

42 168 01) 172 IN)'. 

62i 2.V) 00 104 00> . 

52i 283 110 116 00' 

260' 1588 IX) 795 80i ' 2 00 

97 443 75 70 00' 



•i- 



19 24 
23 00 

7 70 
62 .39. 
KM) 88 

20 15 
17 IK) 

7 01) 

124 74, 

4 00 



12 75 
7 00 

5 IN) 
:« iO 
97 64 
12 .51) 

6 IN) 
2 00 

100 71 
4 00 



Total :388381 



1100 



160 

8a3 

18.32' 

1666 

210; 

1.568 
954 
690 
761); 

3617 
736i 

16341 
5.31 

1.334 > 
612 1 
532 



7.51.. 

•.'S»2 146 

686 144 

4,38 169 

791 20 

182 219 

2.52 59 

326 84 

262 70 

1261) 401 

.•»8 188 

.573 133 

311 265 

376 1286 

298 122 

2.55 134 



41 
17 
90' 

:i4 

17! 



130, 

182 

622 

6:191 

90 



6 INI| 

33 90' 

5 00' 



2 00 

19 74 

2 60 



117 629! 

52 42i»; 

8 2881 

23 .360 

215' 13:17' 

15, X\0 

83' 551 

19 156 

:« 238 

iili 221 

33' 215 



34205 



117434544 



1652 



51 

429i 
9(111 
5981 
203| 

686: 

mi. 

186: 
381 
1494 
565 
(MiO, 
.511; 
699 
297 
376 



526 001 102 OOl 1 1 10 Hi. 

2100 00 13.50 00 145 00 76 60 67 25 

4316 (N) 3191 00 128 50 

4429 10 1362 IK) UN) IN)[ 

273 00 1830 



.3102 00 
1997 90 
1665 IN) 
.5:16 .35 
88.37 50 
.3(N)9 I61 
2119 10 
2912 15 
4675 .35 
2035 00 
206:1 85 



1897 IN) 
815 IN) 
Um IK) 
i:{01 (N) 
;5.325 IH) 
:i71l) 10 
4413 95 
:«K» 87 
3667 50 
1093 IK) 
1841 21) 



674 00 290 00 
89 00, 01 00 
122 50 



117 IH) 
93 50 
20 00 



165 00 , 
121 IK); 



84 00, 
34 01) 
36 66 
47 00 
169 40 114 00 
73 11: 77 52 



42 00 

,52 IN) 

2:1 IN) 

1 00 

.57 IN) 
15 01) 

5:1 00 
:«) 00 



/4 001 

44 OOJ 
17 OOj 



51 75 
67 17 
80 45 
48 70 
48 00 



135381531279556 2960796 1611916 4811036361813 25 



87 90 

92 26 

105 28 

124 49 

42 40 



1441 99 



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Mt 7 ()<> 


70 -1 (H) 


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15 12 iiO 


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74 H« 71 


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1441 99 



KKPOKT OF THE HOME MISSIO-N COMMITTEK, 
EASTERN DIVISION, 1899-11)00. 



To llif Vi^nftiMe tlif Qfneral Assemld]/ : 

The pMt year han been one of diligent and <{uiet activity, as well an of steady, if not 
rapid progress. The work of your Committee has been directed mainly to tho oversight 
and aid of charges under the care of ordained miHsionaries, and of MiHsion Fielda, sup- 
nlitui as fully as poaaible by student misHionarieH, chietly during the summer season. 
They have had very little to do in the Hupply of vacant charges, so little that several 
ministers whose names are on the roll of probationers have had but few appointments. 
Of the eight ministers and probationers available for supply, whose names were on the 
list on May Ist, 1899, c.ie has been placed in charge of an Augmented Congregation, 
another has been called and ia about to be settled in a Helf-Hustainint; ch<.rge, two more 
have been appointed to missionary charges, some have left the bounds and only one of 
them is now on the list. At present there are the names of only three ministers on this 
list. 

At the date of last report the number of ordained missionaries in charge of the 
congregations to which they had been appointed was thirty-seven. Of these five have 
l)eeii called bv. and settled over, the congregations in which they were then laboring, 
three of whicn are self-sustaining ; and the other two are receiving aid from the Augmen- 
tation Fund. Seven more have been called and settled in other charges. The number 
of congregations at present under the care of ordained missionaries is thirty-one. 
Forty-one catechists were employed during the summer, and two during the winter. 
Thirty-nine groups of stations were served by the catechists, and some assistance was 
given to pastors in large and scattered congregations. In the fields which these young 
men cultivated there are 1,73.'{ families claiming connection with our Church ; 2,085 
communicants, 1,788 in attendance at the Sabbath Schools, and 1,748 attending the 
weekly prayer meetings. These stations contributed 9.'}35..38 for Foreign Missions, 
$17H.04 for Home Missions, 860..S.S for the College Fund, $180.03 for other schemes ; 
making a total of $804.73 for the general Schemes of the Church, besides $7,011.61 to- 
wards payment for the services which they received from their missionaries. 

In consequence of the failure of a considerable number of the ordained missionaries 
to send in reports to your Committee ii. is impossible to furnish statistics of a similar 
sort with reference to their charftes which would not be misleading. Our expenditure, 
however, shows that $7,301.84 have been paid for this branch of the service, while $716.- 
:{8 have been paid for the supply of vacant charges. 

The customary liberality of our people has been maintained during the past year. 
Your Committee began the year with a balance due the Treasurer of $027.99. They 
closed with a balance on hand of $98.03. The receipts have, therefore, exceeded the 
expenditure for the year by $720.02. The total amount received during the year was 
$14,.'{79.45, as against $13, -486.33 for the previous year, an increase of $893.12. Of this 
amount $2,315.56 were contributed for Home Missions in the North-West. 

Your Committee have voted grants to fields which have, or hope to have, ordained 
missionaries during the current year, amounting to about $8,000, and as other labour- 
ers and expenses of administration will require some $6,000 more, contributions equal 
to those which have V>een made for the past year will be required for the current year, 
and any increase can be easily and wisely expended, either in the strengthening of the 
work in the Maritime Provinces, or in meeting the clamant needs of the great North- 
West. 

The Committee cannot but think regretfully of the loss which they and the whole 
Church have sustained in the removal by death since the last meeting of the Assembly 



ll 




32 



of their beloved brother, Rev. P. M. Morrison, D.D., who for so many years acted as 
Secretary of this Committee, and gave such valuable counsel and help in carrying on its 
work, but they would bow with submission to the will of Him whose they are and whom 
they serve, knowing that His wisdom is unsearchable and His love infinite. In common 
with other Committees whom he served so wisely and so well, they have put on their 
record a minute expression of their appreciation of his character and work. 



:'ii 



Finances — Comparative Statement. 



Catechists 

Ordained Missionaries. 
Supply vacant charges. 

North-west 

Expenses of all kinds . , 
Books for Labrador . . . 



Expenditure. 



1897-98. 

$2,402 03 

6,692 84 

608 31 

2,390 89 

527 89 

13 06 


1898 99. 

$3,075 59 

7,634 28 

812 02 

1,886 61 

718 49 


1899-1900. 

$2,615 03 

7,301 84 

716 38 

2,315 56 

698 48 

6 14 


$12,635 02 


$14,126 99 


$13,653 43 



III :;i 



i:r 



Receipts. 

1897 98. 

From Congregations $11,040 15 

Bequests 325 00 

Donations 560 66 

Repayments 147 02 

Students' Association 279 84 

Interest 499 60 

W. H . m". S.', St." John Presbytery '.'.'.'.'.'. 100 00 

W. F.M. S., " " 247 28 

C. E. Soc 911 88 

Rev. James Ross, collections in St. John 

Presbytery 133 95 

• ' $14,245 38 



(C 

(( 
li 
tc 
tt 
t( 
(( 



189899. 


1899-1900. 


$11,389 02 


$11,778 40 


370 00 


225 00 


118 75 


444 95 


96 13 


207 90 


217 00 


189 00 


524 60 


534 84 


24 78 


378 00 


104 08 


117 16 


483 36 


375 76 


158 61 


128 45 


$13,486 33 


$14,379 45 



m V, :.,- ■ 






AH of which is respectfully submitted, 



JOHN McMillan, Chairman. 
E. A . McCURDY, Act. Secretary. 



\l 



33 



■•1 



1 



ORDAINED MINISTERS AND PROBATIONERS EMPLOYED DURING 
THE WHOLE OR PART OF 1899-1900, 



(99-1900. 


1,778 40 


225 00 


444 95 


207 90 


189 00 


534 84 


378 00 


117 16 


376 75 


128 45 





NAME. 


-q 


Employed 




Under Appointment, Removed or 




From 


To 


Settled. 


Rev. W. C. Morrison 


May, 


1899 


May, 


1900 


Bay of Islands, Margaree Harbour. 




' J. H. Stewart 


K 


44 


44 




Riversdale, Lunenburg Co. 




' .J. Valentine 


tt 


44 


44 




Grand Falls. 




' D. 0. McKay 


4i 


44 


Jan., 




Under appointment. 




* A. S. Morton 


4 4 


<4 


May, 




Fairville. 




• A. W. Lewis 


44 


44 


44 




Waweig, Loggieville. 




♦ G. S. Milligan 


44 


44 


4i 




Under appointment. 




' H. G. Gratz 










Settled at Alberton. 




' R. C. Quinn 


May. 


1899 


May, 


1900 


Metapedia. 




* J. Layton 


44 


44 


ii 


44 


Cove Head. 




♦ A.D.Archibald.... 


44 


44 


Nov 3rd, '99 


Settled at Richmond. 




' A. H. Foster 


Oct. l8t,'99 


May, 


1900 


St. Matthews, St. John. 




' Ed. Smith 


May, 

4( 


1899 






Under appointment. 
Grand Bay. 




' C. D. Mcintosh .... 




May, 


1900 




' A. L. Eraser 


(4 




44 


44 


Settled at Newport. 




' L. H. McLean 


44 




Sep. 5th, '00 


Pt. Hastings and Pt. Hawkesbury. 




* R. Murray 


44 




IVfav. 


1900 


Lawrencetown and Earltown. 




' E. A. McCurdy 


14 




Oct., 


1899 


Under appointment. 




' J.R.Douglas 


4( 




May, 


1900 


Annapolis. 




' J.M.Allan 


Jan. 1st, '00 


44 


44 


Lawrencetown. 




♦ R. Davidson 


Mayl8t,'99 


Oct3l8t,'99 


Carletown and Chebogue. 




' A. F. Robb 


44 


44 


May, 


1900 


Doaktown. 




' L. R. Bouchard .... 


44 


44 






EdniunHton. 




' M.A. McKenzie 


44 


44 






Middle River. 




' Jas. Whiteside 


Nov., 


1899 






Millerton. 




' D. Campbell 

• A.M.Hill 


May, 


44 






Springfield. 




44 
44 


44 
44 


Dec, 


1899 


Dirby. 
Shemogue. 




♦ Wm. Dakin 




' A. Ross 


4i 
44 


44 

ii 


May, 
Mch. 


1900 


Andover. 




' K.J.Douglas 


Hampton. 




' J. C. Robertson. . . . 


44 


(4 


May, 




Nashwau't and Stanley. 




' Wm. McLeod 










Isaac's Harbour and C. Harbour. 




* A.F.Fisher 


May, 


1899 


Quoddy and Moser River. 




' A. J. H. Eraser 


44 


ik 






New Dublin. 




' D. McLean 


44 


(fc 






West Cape. 




' L. A. McLean 


44 


ik 






Louisburg. 




' T. Hunter Boyd.... 


June, 


1899 






Riverside. 




' J. R. McClure 


Oct. l8t,'99 






Harcourt. 




' Wm. Hamilton 


Nov. 1st, '99 






Bay of Islands. 




' F. C. Simpson 


May, 


1899 






Under appointment. 




' A. Simpson . . 


Jan., 


1900 






44 44 




' A. L. Eraser 


May, 


1899 






44 (4 




* J. A. Greenlees 


Aug., 


44 






44 44 




' M.H.Mcintosh.... 


Nov., 


44 






44 44 




* A. Boyd 


Mch., 


1900 






44 44 




• Jas. R. McKay 


Ap. 1st, " 






44 14 




' E. Smith 


Jan., 
May, 


1900 

44 






44 41 




' John Baird 


44 44 



- 1 



iiiiil,! ' 



11^1 



my: 



34 



MINISTKUS AND PROBATFONRRS AVAILABLE FOR SUPPLY MAY 1st. 1!>00. 
Rev. G. S. Millig^n. | Ruv. A. Boyd. | Rev. J. R. McKity. 

ORDAINED MISSIONARIKS LOCATFD MAY IsT, 1900. 

I'ru.shiih'iij of SiidiiOii. 
Rev. L. A. McLejiii L()uiHbur<,'. 

Freiib})tfrii of liufDifss. 
Rev. \V. C. Morrison M;irt;fireo llnrhotir. 

FfesUytfirij of Pictoii, 
Rev. R. .1. DounLis Little H'ho'r and F. Grant. 

.Preshiiti'ii/ (</ 1'V(tll(ii('. 
Rev. A. H. H.ittie Port El^rin. " 

Fre.shiili'ni if Trmii. 
Rev. R. Murray EarUown and New A nnaii. 

Pn'.shijlcni <f lhillfii.<\ 

Rev. A. M. Hill Dighy. 

■ .1. R. DiJUi^las Annapolis. 

' Wm. Hamilton Bay of Islands. 

" J. M. Allan Lawrencetown. 

' VV. A. Ross St. John's, Newfoundland. 

' J. A. Greonlees Belle Isle 

Fresbyteni of Lnni-nhnrii idkI Ycinioiitlt. 

Rev. .T. PI. Stewart Riversdale. 

" A. ,1. H. Fraser , New Dublin. 

Frctih liter 11 of St. Jolni. 

Rev. L. M. Bouchard . . Edmunston. 

A . Ross Andover. 

" CD. Mcintosh Grand Bay. 

A. H. Foster St. Matthew's, St. John. 

R. Davidson Riverside. 

.1 . C. Rol)ert8on Nashwaak. 

" D. Campbell Springfield. 

J. Valentine (irand Falls. 

A. S. Morton Fairville. 

' ' Hunter Boyd : . . . Waweig. 

Freshytery of Miramichi. 

Rev. A. F. Robb Doaktown. 

" J. R. McCIure Harcourt. 

" J. Whiteside Millerton. 

F ••"tbytery of P. E. Tdond. 

Rev. D. McLean West Cape. 

" Wm. Murdoch Richmond Bay. 

" J. Layton St. P'ter'sRd.& Cove Head. 



35 



OATKCHISTS KMI'LOYKU FItOM iMAV 1st, UMMI 
I'lfDhiitcni of Sijdnvij. 



4 -A 



I •vl. 



Na.mk. 



CoLI.KtiB. 



Station. 



D. .1. Nicholson Dilhoiisie Loch Tist. . 

A. M. McLeod Hdlifnx Littlo liras d'( )r. 

C. C. Mclniosii " AssistHiit to Rev. .1 A. Mc(«laHlmti. 

J. C. McLood " Leitcli'N Creek. 

II. D. Mcliitosli Drtlhou.'jie Neil's Unrbour and liij^oiiisli. 

\V. A. Fraser AHMistant to Rev. D. Drunmioud. 

Prenl'ijterii of Iiirt'nu'.sti. 

Noniian Mc(i)iieei> Dalliou.sie Wfst Hay. 

W. .1. iMc(.^)uiirrie <^>iier_'n'.H .\richat. 

J. \V. McPhail Pleasant Bay. 

I'lf.shiiterii of Fii'tim. 

\V. H. Sedywiok Halifax Ciirilioo and Lyon's Hrook. 

A. .1. McDonald " . . .Isaac's Harbour. 

A. ■]. W. Myers Dalhousie Cape (Jeorije. 

I'ri'shiih.fii ('/ iVallur)'. 
.]. .\. W. NicliolsiMi Halifax Tatania!,'oiiche. 

I'lfuhijli't-]! (if Linii'ithinii (Old Yormdidlt. 

Vj. H. Ramsay Daihousio Ili\erfidale. 

NV. K. Cunningbani Halifax Lijckepurt. 

I'reahiitetii of Tntro, 

B. Glover Halifax Brookfield. 

R. G. McKay " North Salem. 

R. B. Lay ton Dalhousie Harmony. 

.John Bradley. . . " Five Islands. 

R. H. Stavert " North River. 

.Jfune.s Mcintosh Cnicm, N. Y Cariboo Mines. 

Prt'nlnib'rii of ll<difn.r. 

Fred Vance Dalhousie Labrador. 

Geo. Millar King's . Mount Uniacke. 

(Jeo. Wood Halifax Middleton. * 

.lames Ramsay " Baxter's Harbour. 

A. D. Archibald " North Dartmouth. 

Prt'di\ili'f\i (if Mifdmuiti. 

G. M. Ross Halifax Kouchiboguac. 

Charles Main Dalhousie Miscou. 

E. McDonald " New Bandon. 

W. J. Johnson Halifax llardwicke. 

I'rpshiiti'nj (if St. Jdlin. 

D. H. McKinnon Halifax Cabano. 

.1. .1. McCaskill " Fort Kent. 

W.W.Conrad " Golden Grove. 

A.A.Smith " Baillie. 

C. A. Myers Dilhousie Three Brooks. 

■ ). H. A. Anderson Halifax St. Martin's. 

A. L. McDougall ... " New Maryland. 

W. A. McKay Dalhousie Salina. 

Piesh titer II of P. E. Idand. 
T. S, Ross Halifax Richmond Bay. 



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N; • 




REPORT OF THE AUGMENTATION COMMITTEE. 

(WESTERN SECTION.) 



To the Venerable the General Assembly: — 

Through the coutimied goodness of God to our Beloved Church, and through 
the growing liberality of her members and adherents your Committee is glad to be 
able to report substantial progress in the work under its care. Had the Church 
responded more liberally to the appeals made by your Committee during the year 
fifty-six Mission Stations would have been advanced to augmented churches, but 
owing to lack of funds only twenty-one of the fifty-six were taken on the list of con- 
gregations. In the light of this significant fact, is it not a pity that so many con- 
gregations, and even some Presbyteries spend so much time and energy to get from 
the Fund what it has not to give, and do so little to raise the money requisite to 
meet the urgent demands of the Church — demands that in the interests of the 
Church and of the State ought to be granted. In some quarters the fund is too 
much regarded as a fountain from which all that are inclined have a right to draw 
freely and forever. While aiming to help as far possible the weak, your Committee 
has specially striven to stimulate mission stations to put forth all their energies to 
become self-supporting and aid giving. Believing that Churches like individuals, 
can easily be pauperized and demoralized ; that to encourage needless chapels of 
ease is an injury to the Church, and a waste of the Master's means ; and that the 
Church ought to spend her strength in cultivating the fields most likely to yield 
the best returns, your Committee without fear or favour has in all its grants acted 
on these principles, and thus aided the Home Mission Board in its great work of 
evangelizing the Dominion. Thus instead of aiming at keeping up two weak 
congregations where one strong united charge ought to be ; instead of encouraging 
the planting of new churches wliere not absolutely needed, your Committee work- 
ing through Presbyteries has urged weak churches if possible to unite, and dis- 
couraged the planting of churches in fields that are not promising. 

Your Committee respectfully begs the serious attention of the Assembly to the 
painful fact that a large number of augmented congregations give so little to the 
.Augmentation Fund ; that while they are generous to some of the other funds of 
the church, they are neither just nor generous to the one supporting them ; and 
that this one-sided lil)erality has greatly hampered the Fund, and hindered the 
Committee from doing most important work for the Master, so jealous that His 
disciples should not neglect the liome. 

The Fund began last year with a balance on hand of 13,025.54 and ended with 
a balance on hand of $943.80. In plain English the receipts were $2,081.74 less 
than the expenditure. If the church is to take next year thirty or forty additional 
mission stations on her augmental list ; if the work of helping the young and 
promising congregations of new Ontario and of the far west to become self-sustaining 
is to be carried on with vigor, the Committee will need at least $30,000 or $6,872 
more than last year. Most of the reports sent to the Convener are cheering, that 
by Dr. Findlay being specially encouraging. As Dr. Robertson's report covers a 
large and important field, and throws much light on the Committee's work, it is 
here given in full. 



6i':i 



49 



AUGMENTATION REPORT OF THE SYNODS OF MANITOBA AND THE NORTH-WEST 

TERRITORIES AND BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Last year was perhaps the most prosperous in the history of augmentation 
ill Western Canada. Of the tliirty-three congregations on the list a year ago, 
twelve, or one-third became self-sustaining ; twenty missions were organized 
as congregations and placed on the list; and thirty-eight more were qualified 
according to the regulations of the Committee, but to place them on the list would 
embarrass the Fund. 

The removal of these congregations from the list and the reduction in other 
grants effected a saving of $2,450; the grants made to r^ew congregations amount 
to $2,950. 

It seems a pity that the state of the Augmentation Fund docs not admit of all 
Missions offering a minimum of .f550 towards salary being put on the list. 
Denying growing charges tlie right of complete organization is calculated to arrest 
development and postpone the day of self-support. 

Long distance and expense in travelling under the Probationers scheme in 
operation in the East impracticable in the West. There is a Probationers' Com- 
mittee, but, generally speaking, appointment to vacant charges are made for periods 
varying from one to six months. Of the forty-one charges in these two Synods 
sixteen are vacant. In the congregations reporting, the accessions to the com- 
munion rolls give an average of a fraction over twelve each which for Western con- 
gregations is quite encouraging. 



SYNOD OF MANITOBA AND THE NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES. 

On April 1st there were twenty-eight augmented charges in tliis Synod, of 
which fourteen were vacant. During the year these were removed from the list : 
Dominion City, Gretna, Hilton, Treherne, Breadalbane, Fairmount, Shoal Lake, 
Milita, Wolseley, Rosedale and St. Luke's. 

The additions to the list were : Belmont, Swan Lake, Nesbitt, Ravenswood, 
Pipestone, Strathclair, Shoal Lake, Saltcoats, Oxbow, Alameda, Wapella, Aber- 
neathy, Qu'Appelle, Hillburn and Broadview. The missionaries in charge of seven 
of these hfteen additions to the list are already called or being called and settled 
as pastors, which speaks well for pastors and congregations. Breadiilbane, Fair- 
mount I'ud Shoal Lake, which were put on the list last year, are removed already. 
There need be no fear that congregations sufKciently strong to support ordinances 
will be allowed to lean on the Fund even if they were disposed to do so. 






m 






REPORT BY PRESBYTERIES. 



1. Presbytery of Superior — Has no augumented congregations. 

3. Prenhytery of Winnipeg — During the year Dominion City and Gretna became 
self-supporting charges, leaving three still on the list. Selkirk reports a slight 
growth in families and communicants, but its financial record is unchanged, 
ilillbrook has as yet, no pastor settled over it ; an ordained missionary is in charge 
and it is hoped a settlement may follow. Meadow Lea reports a slight increase in 
communicants, but a decided falling-off in families, the result of a more accurate 
census. The congregation i)rocured a manse last year. 

.?. Prcxbytery of Roek Lake — Has five augmented charges. Thornhill as to 
families and memlSership remains unchanged, although nine communicants were 
added. A manse was purchased and the congregation is preparing to stand alone 
soon. Crystal City is vacant. Families and communicants have increased, and 
the financial record improved. In a year the congregation is likely to become 



m 



--i\: 



60 






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Helf-suppurtiiiji. LaKiviere is still without a jiastor, Imt growing. Bi'linoiit aj)- 
pears ou tlie list for tlie first time, and promises uot to stay long. The liiildur 
Station is building a church. They j»romise !?700 and a manse, an average of 
$20 per family, or $10 per communicant. Swan I^ake is also new ; witii 
thirty-three families and sixty-nine communicants, the congregation offers $800 
and asks for a grant of $100. 

//. Pre^hiftcnj of (ilcuhoi o—lUlton became self-svistaining, showing nvimerical 
and linancial grow til. Treherne undertakes to support its ow n pastor too, aiul its 
strength seems e(iual to the task. Cypress River is improving as a settled charge, 
and will. soon stand alone. Is'esbitt was put on the li.st recently. It has had a hard 
struggle with a church debt, which cripi)led it, but the debt is being materially 
reduced. Kavenswood until recently was a mission. Plymothism and other 
religious lights have done much harm; but, under a pastor, the scattered sheep are 
returning to the fold. 

5. Pi-enhgtenj of Portayr la Pruiric — Has no augmented congregations, Ro.sedale 
having becouu' self-sustaining on settlement. 

<>. Prexbt/tery of Brandon — Brcadalbane called a pastor and resolved to become 
self-sustaining. A tornado blew down the church in the principal station, au<l the 
congregation erected a substantial stone structure last summer. P^lkhorn is vacant, 
with an ordained mi.ssionary in charge. The strength of the congregation is in- 
creasing slowly. Pipestone is a stranger. Only thirty-six families and fifty- 
uine communicants are reported, but the people agree to contribute for salary $700 
per annum. 

7. Presbytery of Minnedona — Newdale reports a loss in families, but a decided 
gain in communicants ; its promise for salary rises from $500 to 1650. Fairmount 
came on the list last year, and left this; and Shoal Lake keeps it company. Bin- 
scarth is not doing up to the measure of its strength — Held is too wide — the cliarge 
is not settled but under the care of an ordained missionary. Yorktou is growing 
steadily and is not likely to need help after this year. Saltcoats is new and 
spirited, but not strong. Strathclair is an old mission, but a new congregation. It 
has fifty families but only sixty-seven communicants, although the additions last 
year were fourteen. Its stay in the half-way house sliould be brief, 

8. Presbytery of Melita — By a different grouping o " stations, Melita has become 
.self-sustaining, and promises Avell. Elva is .settled, built a manse and offers to 
become self-sustaining after this year. Oxbow came on the list during the year, but 
for the effort to wipe out liabilities connected with the building of the church and 
manse in the central station, would likely stand alone. The Glen Eweu station 
of the charge built a church last summer. Alameda is an old mission, but through 
various causes suffered in the x^ast. The congregation is united and liberal ; it is 
vacant, but a settleme'nt is expected shortly. 

y. Presbytery of Regina — Wolseley after this needs no help. Whitewood has 
suffered in numbers through are-arrangement of stations, but its promise for salary 
has increased by $100. Lximsden too has improved its financial standing. Five 
missions come on the list as congregations. Waper-: has oixty-nine families, is 
likely to develop strength and soon stand alone, it promise.^ $625 to support its 
pastor — no minister yet called. Abernethy is a prosperous farming settlement 
north of the Qu'Appelle river; the communicants number eighty-eight, although 
the families only thirty-five. The average contribution for salary is over $16 
per family. Qu'Appelle Station is growing charge, on the main line of the C. P. R., 
with forty-one families and sixty-six commiuiicants. The average per family 
here is over $15. The congregation is calling the missionary who supplied the 
charge and consolidated it during the past four years. Hillburn congregation lies 
north of Whitewood and Wapella ; and like Abernethy is off the line of railway. 
Its forty families promise an average contribution of $15 each. Broadview dates 
as a mission from the building of the C. P. R., but its growth has been retarded 
by the Indian Reserve situated north of the railway tra-^k. Broadview is 
a divisional point of the C. P. R.,.the congregation has a church and a manse, and 
ther' e fair prospects of growth. The thirty-five families forming the charge 
iM- nise $600. 



&% 



SYNOD OK BRITISH COLI'MBIA. 



ill this Synod were eleven aujiniented ('liar}j;es last siinu<>. l)urin<; the year 
Trail and Vernon were removed and ^Nlaple Creek. Davishurj;, Cranhrook and 
<;rand Forks phurd on the list, all of whieh have ealle<l pastors. The average rate 
per fonimnnieant lor salary is $10.14 and the average grant for each of the thirteen 
congregations is nearly !?202. The increase in eominiinieants in the eleven congre- 
gations reporting was 145, an average of thirteen. 



KKPORT BY I'KKSHVTKRIKS. 

/. ('(iljjdrj/ — lias three auguni^nted charges, two of which were ])ut on the 
list during the year, vi/ : Piiicher Creek and Davisburg. ^MacLeod missed being 
made the end of a division of the Crow's Xest Pass Kailway, and it did not grow 
jis expected. Settlers are coming in now, however, and the congrc^'Mon is likely 
to increase in numbers. ]Mai)le Creek has reduced its church debt, and bought a 
manse, making commendable etlbrts to clear both properties in a short time. Davis- 
l)urg has greatly revive<l and promises .soon to stand alone. 

.'. Ediiionfon — Reports liftle change. Both congregations called were di.sa, 
pointed, and are now vacant. Innisfail sliows a gratifying increase in communi- 
cants and increases its contributions. Strathcona would likely have been self- 
sustaining had they .secured a pastor, but disappointment has kept them back. 
With the new century they are sure to stand alone. 

.1 Kamloopx — Vernon beca^me self-sustaining. Spollumcheen shows no change. 
Hemmed in as the stations are, growth must be slow. 

4. Kootfuai/ — Kaslo suffered seriously owing to the miners' strike : the pros- 
pects this year are better. C'ranbrook takes its place on the list for one year only, 
and asks for SI 50 : it has called and is settled. Grand Forks called, and is 
settled also. Both these congregations arc liberal and })rogressive. Cranbrook 
built a church, and Grand Forks is building this season. Two other missions in 
this Presbytery, Fernie and PhaMiix became self-supporting charges last year with- 
out going by way of augmentation. 

■'). Neir Westminister — The situation in the Fraser valley is but slighily 
changed. Chilliwack remains stationary in numbers, but sIioavs a decided increase 
in contributions. Supperton will take years to recover from the disastrous fire of 
last year ; families and communicants show a slight decrease, contributions station- 
ary. Delta shows life but no growth numerical or (ianancial. 

(1. Victoria — St. Paul's, Victoria, is the only augmented charge in this Pres- 
bytery. Congregation streadily reducing church debt and reducing its claims on 
the Fund. 

By the help of the Church and Manse Board there were five churches and six 
manses erected during the year in connection with the Augmented Charges of the 
two Synods. 

In closing this report the Convener w'ould take the opportunity to thank the 
A.ssembly for the honour done him in calling him to this position of tru.st — a positic 1 
so ably filled by those previously holding the office ; also to thank all who in any 
way have advanced the interest of the fund in the past. 

3Iay the God of all gru^^e raise up devoted men in this department of the 
Master's work ; and may the Home Mission work be so conducted in the great 
fields north, south, east and west, that every part of our beloved laud may be 
gladdened by a soul refreshing wealth of gospel blessing; 



All of which is respectfully submitted. 
Hamilton, May 19th, 1900. 



S. LYLE, 

Convener. 




52 



If,',, 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



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ii .a- 




AUGMENTATION FUND, 1899-1900. 

Dr. 

Balance at Cr.. April lat, 1899 

Presbytery of Quebec ... «1,275 00 

" Montreal 1,737 50 

'* Glengarry 487 50 

" Ottawa 1,666 70 

" Lanark and Renfrew 675 00 

" Brockville 625 00 

♦* Kingston 1,006 00 

•♦ Peterborough 837 50 

" Whitby 100 00 

" Lindsay , 268 50 

" Toronto 1,150 00 

" Orangeville 300 00 

" Barne 1,022 00 

•♦ North Bay 622 25 

'• Owen Sound 630 00 

" Saugeen 312 50 

" Guelph 150 00 

" Algoma 650 50 

" Hamilton 1,307 60 

Paris 176 00 

'• London 960 00 

" Chatham 262 60 

" Sarnia 262 60 

" Stratford 2.S7 60 

" Huron 446 00 

Maitland 331 25 

Bruce 150 00 

" Superior 

" Winnipeg 800 46 

" Rock Lake 287 50 

" . Glenboro' 296 66 

" Portage la Prairie 50 00 

" Melita 410 61 

" Brandon 226 00 

'* Minnedosa 977 33 

" Regina 575 00 

Calgary 250 00 

Edmonton 448 07 

" Kamloops 300 00 

'* Kootenay .. 600 00 

" Westminster 575 00 

" Victoria 262 50 

Donations 

Bequests 

Interest 



Cr 


$3,025 64 


613 20 


2,244 58 


572 31 


1,041 86 


1,597 06 


639 65 


580 40 


724 69 


273 58 


240 61 


3,815 04 


228 18 


488 90 


151 96 


329 87 


209 32 


604 73 


185 31 


1,267 20 


612 31 


1,353 25 


367 88 


262 14 


356 25 


457 02 


267 14 


205 67 


66 76 


664 76 


169 00 


86 30 


69 00 


90 45 


292 00 


108 00 


145 00 


30 96 


49 00 


162 60 


"263' 75 


87 60 


673 30 


676 37 


66 00 






53 



Printing, including proportion of Blue Book f 226 80 

Expenses of Committee M5 50 

Dr. Robertson's salary and expenses 675 65 

I'orportion of expenses Committee on T.P. Societies 10 00 

Interest on advances 96 00 

Proportion of general expenses 400 00 

Balance on hand, April 1st, 1900 943 80 

$26.154 07 



$26.154 OT 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



/ give and bequeath to the Treasurer, for the time being, of the Committee on the 
Augmentation of Stipends of the Presbyterian Church in Canada {Western Section)^ 

in trust for the said Committee, the sum of , 

to be paid out of my personal estate without any deduction whatever; and I direct 
that the receipt for the said sum of the Treasurer of the above-named Committee sbali 
constitute and be sufficient discharge therefor. 



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IIEPORT OF THE AUGMENTATION COMMITTEE 
(EASTERN SECTION), 1899-1900. 



To the Fenerable the Oeneral Assembly : — 

Your Committee on the Augmentntion Fund for the Eastern Section of the Church 
begs leiive to present a statement of the work d(me durins{ the year ending March Hist, 
and the promises made for the current year. 

The Committee, at the Autumn meeting, according to permission of Assemhly, 
made grants in addition to those reported to Assembly, as follows : — 

Presbytery of Inverness. 
Baddeck Forks $200 00 

Presbytery of Pictou. 
Ferrona $150 00 

Presbytery of Lunenburg and Yarmouth. 
Clyde and Barrington " S250 00 

Presbytery of Halifax. 
Noel .' '. .' . $100 00 



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At the same meeting the Committee after due consideration found that $10,000.00 
was required to pay the grants in full, and to cover the necessary expenses of adminis- 
tration. The Synod of the Maritime Provinces sanctioned the proposal to raise this 
amount, and allotted the sum to Presbyteries to be collected from their congregations. 

The results, whilst not so satisfactory as we should like, upon the whole are en- 
couraging. There was paid into the Treasury before the close of the financial year 
$8,911.13, which amount was short of the sum asked for, and which did not meet our 
annual expenditure. Some thirty-six congregations failed to contribute anything before 
March 31st, a fact which is to be regretted, for if every congregation had forwarded its 
allotted proportion our income would have bc>,lanced the outlay. 

Grants, however, were paid to fifty-five congregations, and by drawing upon the 
Reserve Fund we were enabled to meet our obligations, so that this year no reduction 
of the grants was made. The sum total paid out vas $9,051.64, leaving the working 
balance $3,212.03. 

One congregation became self-sustaining, Wood tock, in the Presbytery of St. John, 
and there was an increase of $365.00 in local support, showing that Presbyteries have 
no^ ceased to exercise vigilance in guarding the interests of the Fund. It is a cause for 
regret that a few congregations were compelled after having decl- ^d their independence 
to tall from their noble position and to apply again for help. .. • Committee whilst 
sympathizing with these congregations, because of their new difficulties, trust thai oon 
by putting forth strenuous efforts they will retrieve their loss and enter upon a brighter 
career. 

The applications for aid during the current year number fifty-three ; and grants 
have been promised accordingly, aggrega ng $9,370.00. The Assembly is asked to 
confirm the Committee's action in its tieatment of special cases, and also to give 
authority to deal with any new application. 



Tr- 



09 

The Committee in confident that if the Fund is to ^row in the (ifleotions of our 
people »nd every year commend itaelf to their sympathies and liberality, very much 
(le|)end8 upon the ^u^mented Congregations themselves- as well as upon the n '.listers 
of rhese charges. Let our people see that those who are being helped are doing their 
utmost to help themselves, that they will receive help no longer when thoy can stand 
nlone, and at the same time do something to assist other weak memiiers, then the effect 
upon all concerned will be gratifying, and both weak and strong will rejoice together in 
the steady progress of a common cause. 

Your Committee cannot close the refjort without referring to Dr. Morrison, the late 
Secretary who died since the last meeting of the Assembly. SVe record our high opinion 
of him as a man and as a minister of the gospel of Jesus Christ, and also our great 
appreciation of the valuable service which he rendered, not merely as a member of this 
(Jommitlee but more especially as its etHcient Secretary. 



E. SMITH, Convener. 

E. A. MoCURDY, Secrdnni. 



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75 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF FRENCH 

EVANGELIZATION, 

1899-1900. 



.1 
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■ i 



■ -'n 



111 forming opinions respecting tlie matters presented in this report several . 
things should be specially taken into account, such as I'le condition of the field 
occupied, what is aimed at, the agencies employed, the results achieved, and the 
hindrances to be overcome. 

The work of the Board is chiefly carried on within the Province of Quebec, the 
population of which is believed by many to have been from the beginning entirely 
Roman Catholic. This is a mistake. Many of the early settlers who arrived with 
the expedition of De Monts, in 1604, were zealous Huguenots, and among them 
pastors who administered the ordinances of the Gospel according to the creed of the 
Reformed Church. They were not permitted to continue long in their new homes. 
The Jesuits from the outset persistently opposed and persecuted them, and the fatal 
blow was finally struck at the Huguenot party in 1627, when Richelieu deprived the 
Protestants of their charter, and gave it to the Company of " One Hundred Associ- 
ates," stipulating that their emigrants should be French Roman Catholics, that 
strangers and heretics should not be allowed into the country, and that the Company 
should place and maintain three priests in each settlement. From that date for 
al)out two centuries the domination of Romanism in the Province, was unchallenged. 
Ignorance, superstition and servile subjection to clerical rule became almost uni- 
versal. The hierarchy controlled all things, religious, social and political. The 
wealth of the church and of religious corporations increased enormously, and the 
bulk of the people were impoverished. 

Such were the conditions under which French Evangelization was initiated 
more than fifty years ago. The effort at first was a feeble one ; but the aim most 
commendable. What was it ? Primarily to make known to the French people 
Jesus Christ as the only Saviour. 

Who that calls himself a Christian can object to this mission ? It is an 
undeniable fact that C hrist is not presented by Romish ecclesiastics to our French 
fellow-countrymen as tl.'^ only Saviour and Mediator between God and men. Tlie 
people are misled by their teachers in this respect, and the aim of our Board is to 
give them the true Gospel. We do not seek specifically to be social or politicsU 
reformers, or scientific propagandists, or censors of the press, or umpires to settle 
the quarrels between capital and labour. But we believe that by bringing the life 
of Christ into the hearts of men we touch all these matters in the most effective 
manner, and thus accomplish a great, essential, and patriotic part of the Cliurch's 
work ; for if Canada is to grow into a truly united, liomogeneous, and strong 
nationality, it must be along the lines of intellectual and spiritual enlightenment. 

The agencies employed by our Boai<l for this purpose are colporters, teachers, 
evangelists and pastoi-s. These were at fii\st brought from Europe ; but for the last 
thirty years they have been educated in the Province. And one impressive evidence 
of the spirituality of our converts is the fact that a large number of them devote 
themselves to these callings. The question, Are we following the best methods 
for realizing our aim ? has often been considered at length in the light of prolonged 



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70 

experience, and the Board still desires to receive suggestions in this connection. 
The inijioitance and elliciency of thoroughly equipped Mission Schools is l»ec.>niing 
more and more ajjparent. These exert an irresistable influence for good. Pupils 
in whose hearts tlie Saviour is enthroned are our best missionaries in the homes of 
the people. Such schools might be indefinitely multiplied were funds for their 
supi)i>rt forthcoming. 

As to results, speaking generally, they are highlj' encouraging. The spirit of 
utter intolerance which prevailed thirty years ago has virtually disappeared. The 
right of private judgment and free sjjeech then denied is now conceded. The 
people fearlessly 6laim and exercise their polit'.cal rights regardless of ecclesiastical 
dictation. They demand propei-ly trained teachers, and better equipped primary 
schools. V^ery many are learning to speak and read and write in English. There 
is a steady increase in the circulation of daily and weekly papers, not a few of 
which manifest a liberal spirit, and are gaining courage to speak out occasionally 
in favor of modern progress and eipial rights to all citizens. 

These are st)me of the fruits of missionary eflbrts in circulating and teaching 
the Word of Clod. But there are others still more satisfactory. As shown in the 
tabulated statements of this report, we are able to count hundreds and thousands oi' 
men and women truly saved by grace and liA'ing consistent Christian lives, acting 
as the •' salt of the earth " and '' the light of the world " in their neighbourhoods. 
It is estimated tiiat the total number of French Protestants, ircludiug those who 
have gone from Canada to the United States, is at least 40,000. And here 
it may be said, as an evidence of their piety, that the weekly prayer meetings of 
our French Churches are more fully and regularly attended than those of English 
congregations. 

What are the main hindrances to this good Mission ? The zealous opposition 
of a numerous and thoroughly organized priesthood, backed by superabundant 
financial resources ; the social disabilities and ostracism to which converts are sub- 
jected ; the reproach of ceasing to be French, as their priests insist, by becoming- 
Protestants. It is right, however, to say that these obstacles are gradually disap- 
pearing through the progress of truth and ft >edom. 

What now stands in the way of more rapid advancement is not so much the 
disinclination of the French people to accept the Gospel as the .<;rowing apathy of 
English Protestants. Many of them seem to regard truth as in opposition to 
grossest error not worth contending for. The great master hindrance — the root 
and source of all minor ones — is lack of strong ruling faith in God and His Gospel. 
There is a spurious liberalism, of which many are enamoured, which is eating into 
vital godliness as doth a canker. The doctrine of those who yield to its seductivt 
influence is that all religions are pretty much alike, and that consequently Roman- 
ism is good enough for those who have been brought up in it, and therefore they 
should not be meddled with. Men and women of this class have faith in money, 
in athletics, in sports and theatres, in commerce, in secular science, in literatui'e, 
art and war, — but no faith in giving r. jiure Gospel to those addicted to the worship 
of the host, and of angels and the Virgin. 



SUMMARY OF THE YEAR'S WORK. 



t 



Thirty-six mission fields wiLh nii ^y preaching stations and fourteen colportage 
districts were occupied by twent; -nine ordained missionaries, eighteen evangelists, 
colporteurs and students, nnd twenty teachers, a total stall' of sixty -seven. 

The average attendance over ten years of age was 2,283. Number of families 
connected with missions, 922, and of single jjcrsons not connected with these 
families, 27(). Number of communicants, 1,033, of whom 146 were added during 
the year. The average attendance at Sunday Scliool, 1,074. and at i)rayer-meeting. 
780. Two tliousand two hundred and forty-eight copies of the Scriptures and 
30,000 religious publications were distributed. Contributions from fields were 
.15,868, and school fees, $1,019, making a total of $7,487. 



.77 

Three hundred and thirty-six Protestant and 254 Roman Catholic pupils 
attended the nineteen mission schools. 

The Board does not luidervalue tlie significance of these statistics. Neither 
docs it seek to measure the force of the moral and spiritual movements generated 
and accelerated throughout the Province by the work of its missionaries, uor to 
tabuhite the peace and comfort brought to many in hours of darkness and sorrow, 
the strength and hope to others in their day of trials and persecmtious, by their 
iiiiuistry of love and symi)athy. It does not lose sight of these things, which in the 
sight of Heaven are of highest value, and would "thank God and take courage." 



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PKKSBYTERIES = - 



AND 
MISSION FIELDS. 



Huron :— 
Grand Bend, etc.. 2 



Chelinnford. etc., 1 



Glengari-y :— ( •■ 

(Jomwall, etc... \ 1 



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ill 

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North Bail '•— 
Villa Marie. 



Ottawa:— 
l/EKllscSt. Marc. 1 

Miisltam I 

L'AiiKe Gardien & 

Perkins 2 

Naniur 2 

I (esert 1 

Monte Bello 



Hull 

Total. 



Montreal :— 
Eglise St. Jean.... 

I< glise Lacroix ' 

St. Jean Baptinle. 

St. Henri 

St. Charles St 

St. Hyacinthe .... 
Clianibly Canton. 

Joliette 

New GlaHgow 

Grenville. 






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95 



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3- ai 27 

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51 58i 35! 4 

4 431 13 



17 365 



Arundel 2 



Ptc.Aux-Trenibl's 1 1 

Italian 1 

Belle Riviere 1 3 

hachnte 1 

Machine 1 



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72 
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104 
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MiSSIONAKIKS. 



8 .33 Rev. S. A. Carriere. 



70j 151 8 500 53 222 57 300 Oi'ij 22 91 Rev. E. D. Pelletier, 



i I i Mr. C. Lapointe, 

! 90 900 !l49 OOi 32 .50 Student. 



10! 5 2(M) 52.3.'-9 10 750 00| 58 .33Uev. J. H Paradis 



15| 
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32 501 



51' 2 32 

501 7| 25i 



151 10: OOi 
19i 3 4501 

25 24 200 

18: 31 lOOi 

28 12! 600 

8: 12! 2001 



243 22 



119 113' 64 1610 



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66 

128 

77 

100 
23 
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20 
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50; 125 14 

5: 55 15 

9i 34 

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6 351 4 



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53279 00852 00 68 83'Rev. E, K. Seylaz, 
53,140 00 480 OOi 40 OU " P.E.St.Germain 

53103 00 480 00 40 00 " J. B. Sincennes 
52:2.32 00 510 00' 43 00 " J. E. Cote. 
52 l(i3 00 KHt 00. 8 33" N. McLaren. 
26i 30 00184 00, .30 (JOMr. C. F. Cruchon, 
Student. 
32 50 



289847 (X) 



202 tie 



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40i 47 
55 25 
3(i 23 



6231 

22! 4 
29: 5 

21.. 



82i 15 

80: 35 

9' 7 

22 15 

35 42 

70' 40 

17 22 

1571 155 
24 

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5 8001 
80 8OO: 
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8 5(H) 



200 
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.53 2.30 
5;< 93 
25 15 
53 110 
53 445 
.52 50 
50 245 
5:1352 
.53 557 
53191 



872 00 
935 (HI 
20 00 
75 00 
375 (H) 
275 (HI 
420 (H) 
203 00 
225 00 
100 00 
346 00 



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83 


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5:1 i 38 00 
53 178 00 
40 10 00 
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425 00 
575 00 
180 00 
505 00 



' ;d.i>. 

83 Rev. C. E. Aniaron, 
91 " R. P. Duclos. 
(H)i " I. P. Brunean. 
(HI' " V. di Geneva, 
25 " C. A. Doudiet. 
91 " M.K. Boudreau 
(HlMr. Ant. Boy. 
01 Rev. L. R. Oiroulx. 



P. S. Vernier. 
" A.J. Lods. 
" P. K. Beau- 
champ. 
" J. J. Bourgoin. 
" V. di Genova. 
" M. Menard. 
" L. Matthieu. 
Mr. L. Bonnenfant, 
Colporteur. 



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PRESBYTERIES 

AND 

MISSION FIELDS. 



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Montreal— Cont'ed . 
Farnham 



St. Jerome 

Vandreuil, etc — 
St. Hyacinthe, etc 
Valley Held, etc... 

St. Gabriel 

Hochelaga 



Total 14 



32 



Quebec :— 
ij'Eglise St. Jean. 1 2 

Ste. Sophie .. 1 

Ham Nord 1 

Ditchfleld 1; 3 

Port au Persil. ... l! 4 
Lac St. Jean ..! 3 



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21 



1136 



544 



49 

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21 

581 
35 
25 



144 



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675 



87 



Cacouna. . 
St. Cyprien. 
Chicoutimi.. 



St. Francis 
trict, etc. . . 



Dis 



St. Blandine, etc, 
Elgin Road, etc.. 
Lorette 



Quebee 

Nicolot, etc 

St. Maurice, etc 



Total. 



Miramichi : 
Bona venture Co. 



St. John :— 
Edniondi^ton, etc. 
St. Francis, etc . 



Total. 



1 11 



Vi 



16 
32 



50 
10 
'26 



5 25 367 



12 

? 
18 
7 
4 
4 
4 
7 



8 39 

3! 5 



80 



36 



7 

33 

17 

6 

7 

5 

33 



20 



170 



75 26 3, 20 
45 



120 



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631 



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: 37 

i 87 
161 
91 

i 57 

170 

42 



1437 



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8 

15 

10 

9 



14 



13 






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176 
550 
715 
615 
530 
550 
100 



21 
25 
24 
22 
47 
6 
8 



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$ $ I 

... 155 60 
...jl78 70 
... 154 00 
...141 33 

,...350 00 
..... 60 00 
....' 50 00 



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32 50 
30 00 
30 00 
32 50 



Missionaries. 



Mr. A. G. Rondeau, 

Student. 
Mr. J. Demole 

Student. 
Mr. A. La.iouceur 

Student. 
Mr. K. Melieres, 

Sludent. 
Mr. Ag. H. Tanner, 

Student. 
.32 50 Mr. J. H. Watier, 

Colporteur. 
Mr. H. Chodat, Col- 



porteur. 



g ioss 30' 



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500 
100 
200 
lOOi 

ioO; 
50l 



186 00^950 00 
48 00 432 00 
l"" 0.... 
40 00;422 00 
10 to . . 



132 UOOl 

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2(i| 100 



52 
24 

40 
50 
14 
10 

12 300 00 

4li 26 00300 00 
53 480 00 50 00 



26 |188 50 

2oi 243 00 



20 100 



20 



26ol 



2922400 
214001 



. 240 00 
.300 00 
.390 00 



Rev. P. Boudreau, 
75 00 •' S. Rondeau, BA 
25 00 Rev. E. Curdy. 
25 00 

43 00 Rev. J. Rey. 
.32 50 Mr. L. Abram. 



71: 86 



13 



13 



33 



33 



I81 133. 20 



19i.i200j 445 



19 



42 



24; Ifi .50 
. . . 88 1600 



241,34 



1650 



768 00 i= 

00 



52 
20 



80 00 



80 00 



25 on Rev. J. K.Menancon 
25 00 

4 33 Rev. J. L. Campbell, 
B.D. 

32 50 Mr. W. Touchette, 

Student. 
35 00; Rev. E. Brandt. 
30 00 
20 00 Mr. Stan. Tsiegei, 

Colporteur. 
25 00 Mile. M. C. Rutti, 

Bible Woman. 
32 50 Mr. J. A. E. Dubuc, 

Colporteur. 
32 50;Mr. A. Charron, 
j Student. 

jg ! 



32 50 35 00 



600 00 40 00 
160 00! 32 .50 



760 00: 72 50 



Mr. H. Joliat, Stu- 
dent. 



Rev. L.R. Bouchard 
Mr. H. Joliat, Stu- 
dent. 



79 



PRKSBYTERY REPORTS. 



Ml 



Huron. — Mr. Carricre's work among the French is very satisfactory and 
hopeful. 

Algoma — Mr. Pelletier's work has heen affected by the fluctuation of the people, 
but he sees evidence of a bright fuUire. 

Glengarry. — The number of families at Cornwall has been reduced by removals, 
but Mr. Paradis is gaining ground and winning his way into the homes of the people 
in his wide field. 

Ottawa. — St. Mark's, Ottawa City, has lost a number of families, but shows 
financial and spiritual progress. Masham : No inr^rease financially, but otherwise 
encouraging growth. Nanur : The wo-*k is prosperous and the pastor hopes to 
have the new church opened early in the summer and fiilly paid for, thanks to 
friends in Ottawa Presbytery and elsewhere. Monte Bella : Thert is a marked 
change in this commimity, and the missionary has been greatly encouraged by the 
people at many points in his wide field. Desert : A mixed field of great extent ; 
encouraging I'esults among the French families. 

Montreal. — St. John's has advanced. The people and pastor have been cheered 
and filled with hope. They have undertaken $1,000 for the Century Fund and 
will succeed. A marked feature of the year at Lacroix Church has been the grow- 
ing and promiseful work among the young. In this, members of the pastor's family 
have rendered invaluable service. St. Jean Baptiste Mission has prospered. St. 
Henri has been discontinued as a separate mission and attached to the St. Charles 
St. Mission. This was done partly for economy and partly owing to the erection 
of mission buildings in the neighborhood by another evangelical denomination. 
TheSi. CAarZca (S/reei 3fi«8t0Ji is supported conjointly by St. Paul's Church, Montreal, 
and the Board of French Evangelization. Services are in both English and French. 
The missionary ha"- access to a large number of Roman Catholic families. The Avork 
at St. Hyacinthe has grown, although the congregation has lost by removals. At 
Chambly Canton the new mission building will soon be finished, and about $400 addi- 
tional required to pay for it. Notwithstanding serious losses by death. New Glasgow 
more than holds its own. Belle Riviere has been disappointing as to numerical 
results, although good vvork done. The venerable missionary at Lachute 
has been able to visit and pray with many Roman Catholics. The work at Gren- 
ville has been satisfactory and the outlook promising. Arundel and Desalaberry 
have been efficiently worked. A manse is being built. The people provide about 
$400, the balance to be collected within the Presbytery. Valleyfield is a new field 
and the centre of a hopeful work in which the missionary has been greatly helped 
and encouraged by the pastor and session of the Presbyterian Church of the place. 
Joliette has been supplied since last fall by students from the Presbyterian College, 
Montreal, the pastor having then accepted a call to the French Protestant Church 
at Ste. Anne, Kankakee, 111. The people are anxious to secure the services of the 
Rev. J. H. Paradis, at present missionary at Cornwall, Ont. The Italian Mission, 
Montreal, is in charge of Mr. V. di Geneva, who has laboured with zeal and success 
among the Italians in the city. 

Quebec. — Mr. S. Rondeau was transferred last fall to the teaching staff at 
Pointe-aux-Trembles. Mr. P. Boudreau took charge of the Quebec Mission and 
has done excellent work. Mf. Boudreau has also opened a new field at St. Valier 
in the County of Bellecha«se. A large number of the people of that parish were 
dissatisfied with the decision of the ecclesiastical authorities respecting site of new 
church, and after long delay invited Mr. Boudreau to visit them. He did so, and 
has since then preached the Gospel almost every week to a congregation varying 
from fifty to eighty persons. The opposition so far is covert, and the influence of 



i'li 



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■-•V 






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it 



80* 

judges, lawyers and clergy from far aud near has failed to close .in open door to the 
preaching of the gospel. A strong man will be needed to help carry on the Avork here. 
Elgin Road. — Rev. J. L. Moriu, M.A., of McOill University, has continued during 
the summer months the work of his fatlier-in-law, the late Dr. Chini(|uy, in this 
mission, whose influence is felt in the neighbouring parishes as is evident from an 
awakened spirit of inquiry which manifests itself in many ways. A colporteur will 
assist Mr. Morin during the coming summer. At La Jeune Lorette, Mr. Tsiegei has 
continued his success among his own people, the Huron Indians. Ste. Sophie and 
Nord Ham Missions have been placed under the care of one missionary. It is an 
immense field for evangelization with only a small number of Protestant families. 
The 1: issionary rented a house in tiie Village of Nord Ham, but had to give it up 
because the parish priest so ordered. Ditchfield is now a purely French field, 
Spider Luke, an English station, having been attached to Megantic Village. The 
people have .shown their appreciation of a permanent missionary by their liberality. 
The progress of the year has been encouraging. The work in the District of St. 
Francis was carrii'd on by a colporteur during the summer. Good work was done 
by the Students' Missionary Society in the Lac St. Jean and Port-au-Persil fields. 
The little church at Port-au-Persil will be finished early next summer. Miss 
Janeway, of New York, collected and forwarded from summer residents at Murray 
Bay, and friends, about $200 for this building. Evangelical Protestantism has a 
worthy representative in Mr. J. L. Campbell, B.D., who ministers to both French 
and English at Chicoulimi. Ste. Blandim. is a new field in which good work was 
done during the summer by Mr. E. Brandt, assistant teacher at Pointe-aux-Treml)les. 
Three families abjured Komanism, and many are reading the Scriptures. It is 
sowing time. Cucovna and St. Ct/pi'ien were worked by one missionary who visited 
Ste. Blandinc also occasionally during the winter. Seed sown five years ago at 
St. Cyprien took root and grew rapidly, for last fall twenty-six individuals openly 
embraced the Gospel and its only Saviour. Fierce persecution followed, and the 
missionary's faith and courage almost failed, for he feared that the little fiock 
would be scattered or forced to recent. They were led by a way that they knew 
not, for peace has been restored, and faith and hope in the future are strong and 
bright. 

Mira,. x'hi. — Mr. H. Joliat spent some weeks colporting in Bonaventure County. 
He was woll received by the peonle and placed many copies of the Scrijitures. 

St. John. — The missionary has supplied Edmondstou aud four outlying stations. 
His chief encouragement has been at Ste. Agathe where he baptized thirteen per- 
sons who had previously abjured Romanism and thus openly confessed Jesus. 



MISSION SCHOOLS. 

The Clergy of the Church of Rome have ever had control of education in the 
Province of Quebec. They have had the authority as well as the means to have 
secured ample education for the people had they been anxious to do so. The fact 
that out of a jjopulation of 1,500,000, there are 600,000 who can neither read nor 
write, determines their attitude t'^./ards popular education and exposes them to 
just reproach, for the recent efforts at improvement and reform are not due to their 
initiative, but to the demands of the people. Such demands on the part of the 
peo])le and also the attendance of so many of their children at our little mi.ssion 
day schools, as well as at the Central Mission Schools at Pointe-aux-Trembles aud 
similar institutions controlled by other evangelical denominations, are the promise 
of better and brighter days. 

Three mission schools disappear from oxir list this year, viz. : — rPerkins, Gren- 
ville, No. 10, and Arundel having been transferred to the School Commissioners of 
their respective municipalities. This accounts for deci'ease in statistics. They go 
to increase the large number similarly transferred vvithin recent years, which the 
Board began and sustained in a humble way up to t ^e point of almost self-support. 



NAMES 

OK 

SCHOOLS. 



NAMKS 

OK 

TKACHERS. 






,V I Scholars. 



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Kiviere aux Canards |Mi8sioiiary. 

Chicoulimi " 

Ditchfield iMnie. Key 

Hani Nord iF. Merlrud 

.St. Cyprien ; Missionary . 



u. T-.C., jMr. H. Chodat 

^^- •'^f'" I I, Mile. A. CouHineau 

J.acroix iMr. J. H. Watier 

StJeanBaptiste K^^lEaS"' 

.St. Chavle. Street I { J^J}}- ^ ^l^^^ 

I'oint-aiix-Tremble.s lUev.J.Bourgoin and 7 others! 

Arundel !Mr. F Watier i 

Chanibly jMissionary 

Italian i " 



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Namur 

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Mr. J. E. Coulin ' 1 

Mr. a. W. Thorn , li 

Mile. A. Beaulieu 1 



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I- ••: 



THE POINTE-AUX-TREMBLES MISSION SCHOOLS. 



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» The Schools are situated ou the north shore of the St. Lawrence River, nine 
miies east of Montreal. They were founded in 1846 by the French Canadian 
Missionary Society, and weie purchased by the General Assembly of our Church in 
1880, and since enlarged. Ou the mission property there are two school buildings, 
one for boys, which can accommodate about 110, and the other for girls, with 
accommodation for between seventy and eighty. Upwards of 4,000 French 
Canadians have already been educated here. Many of vj ese now occupy positions 
of trust and influence as ministers, teachers, physicians, lawyers, merchants, etc. 
Pupils are admitted between the ages of thirteen and twenty-tive, the average age 
last year being about fifteen. A pr'^'t 'ence is given to the sons and daughtera of 
French Roman Catholic parents and i i.e children of recent converts from Rome, 
living in parishes where there is no Pr >l' tant school. Many of these are unable 
to read or write when first received i i » the schools. The session begins in 
October each year and continues for .seven months. The pupils all reside in the 
buildings, and thus enjoy the advantages of a Christian home, under the watchful 
nature of earnest, devoted tea*-' as. They all take then' share of housework. 
The day's duties are thus laid at : — Rise at 5.30 a.m. All are in the class-room 
studying privately from six to seven. Breakfast at seven. Houses and out-door 
work from 7.30 to 8.45. Family worship, when all assemble together, boys and 
girls, at 8.45. School begins at nine with united Bible-class for all, and continues 
till twelve. Dinner at twelve, followed by recreation to 1.30. Then classes till 
four, recreation from four till five, classes from five till six, tea at six, recreation 
to seven ; studying privately in class-room till nine, then family worship (boys and 
girls in their separate buildings) at nine, and all in bed and lights out at 9.30 p.m. 
There are eight teachers, thoroughly qualified, all of whom reside in the buildings. 
They are earnest Christians, of devoted missionary spirit, thoroughly consecrated 
to their work. The Principal, Rev. J. Bourgoin, has been twenty -seven years 
connected with the institution, and is admirably adapted for his position. Miss 
Lena Haddow is the capable directress of the girl's school. All the teachers 
have rendered efficient service. 

Special pi'omineuce is given to the religious instruction of the pupils, and to 
the teaching of God's Word on the points of difference between Protestants and 
Roman Catholics. In these every pupil is thoroughly indoctrinated, and it is na 
exaggeration to state that comparatively few, if any of our English speaking young 
men and women are better acquainted with their Bibles, or are better able to give 
a reason for the hope that is in them, than are the pupils of Pointe-aux-Trembles 
when they leave the Mission Schools there. 

The attendance last session was one hundred and fifty-seven. Not only is 
great care exercised in the selection of pupils from the increasingly large number 
of French Canadians applying for admission, but the policy of the Board in 
inducing the brightest among them to continue for three or four consecutive 
sessions, is bearing manifest fruit. The schools are visited and examined monthly 
by a committee of the Board, appomted for the purpose, and in January at the end 
of the session written examinations are held on all subjects taught. While tbe 
past session was one of great encouragement — eighteen of the pupils having united 
with tho Church in March — it was also one of great anxiety, owing to the long- 
continued and serious illness of the Principal, brought on by too much work at the 
beginning of the session. It is gratifying to report that Mr. Bourgoin is now 
somewhat better, and will soon be able to go from home for change of air. It is 
hoped that he may be able to take the general supervision of the Schools next 
session, with such help as the Board may be able to give. 



83 



When the Board ac(iuired the property in 1S80, it resolved to admit no pupiis 
gratuitously, except Roman CJatholics whv se parents were unable or unwilling to 
contribute ; all others are required to i)ay something, in proportion to theii 
ability, towards board and tuition. The amount received in this way during the 
past session was $1,400. A considerable portion of this amount was money earned 
by the pupils themselves during the preceding summer. After deducting these 
fees, the average cost to the Church of each pupil is $50 per session. The Board 
desires that th^nstitution should be supported by means of scholarships of .$50 
each, guarauteecl by private individuals or Sabbath schools and Young People's 
Associations. A particular pupil is u:j'Mgned to the donor of a scholarship, to 
whom reports as to the progress made are forwarded from time to time. In this 
way a Sabbath school contributing a scholarship is put directly in correspondence 
with the Mission Schools, and the letters, if read publicly to the Sabl)ath school, 
tend to keep up their interest in the work. It is hoped, therefore, that many 
more Sabbath schools and Christian Endeavour Societies will assume the support 
of pupils. From those unable to do so, a contribution is earnestly asked. The 
Board has no hesitation in warmly commending the schools as worthy of public 
confidence, assured that no means are likely, by the blessing of God, to e more 
efficacious in the work of French Canadian evangelization, and in advancing the 
cause of Christ in the Province of Quebec. Year after year God has manifestly 
set his seal upon this work, and blessed the labours of the teachers. " The Lord 
hath done great things for us, whereof we are glad." 






THE principal's REPORT. 



in 



OW 

is 
ext 



The 54th Session of the Pointe-aux-Trembles Schools closed at the end of 
April, when a public examination was held. The Chairman and several members 
of the Board of French Evangelization, and a large number of friends were present 
and were much pleased with the results. 

The day of departure from Pointe-aux-Trembles is always sad, for both 
teachers and pupils. Many tears are shed, for it is here that important transforma- 
tions have takwi place in the young lives. Minds have been enlightened, 
superstitions and errors have fled before the truth, and the chains of Rome 
have been broken by the pure Gospel seen and heard for the first time. Every 
thing in the surroundings is dear ; the class-rooms recall the lessons and the 
teachers ; the chapel, the blessed hours when light entered the heart, and the 
many beautiful hymns and prayers that have ascended to the throne of God. 
One can understand why our scholars, with tears in their eyes say good bye to 
their common home. 

Our institution is more than a school, it i'- v. ^cspel home to which every 
scholar likes to come back after a long absence. This winter a former pupil 
visited us ; twenty-seven years ago he left the Schools and went to the States and 
has been there ever since. Said he, "as I passed through Montreal, I could not 
resist the temptation of seeing again the dear old Poiute-aux -Trembles whi-.-h I 
love, and from which I brought the best souvenirs and the best lessons for my 
success in life ; and the secret of this love is in the fact that the Divine Book is. so 
much taught here. ' ' 

This boy never forgot that he was a pupil of Pointe-aux-Trembles. While he 
worked to provide for his needs he gathered children off the street and. taught 
them what he had learned here; and to-day his Sunday school has become an 
organized church with nearly 300 membei-s. 

The following incidents will help to show once more the great power of the 
Gospel upon the young French Canadians. 

One of our boys, an orphan, and a Roman Catholic, was called away suddenly 
to see his dying sister. He went, but was much surprised at finding her playing 
about in the house. The sister did not expect her brother, but soon they understood 
the meaning of this. Through thfc priest letters had been written to bring back that 
boy to the parish. The priest came to the house. Our boy was forced to go to 




fr ' 






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V. 



Ill 

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84 

t'diil'fSHion, to I'tu'iii iiia?^-, to follow ilu- prayers to the Saints aii«l ix'rlorm 
ccreinoiiicH during a whole week. A way was jtrepared to .send him to a eon vent. 
Tlie body of our jaiitil was in the hands ol' tlie priest, hut hi.s mind was Irec. he 
could I'ot Cortfct his old school, and the trutii ; and at last he escaped and ran 
aw'iy to us. «)n entering again our do«)r he said : ''Siirely the priests will deceive 
n»e no more." 

Ten yc'irs .igo, a loiiner pupil now in the Stales, met one of his countrymen 
ami said to iiim : "Aly deai' friend, when it will be thi time to give an education 
to your children I recotnmend you to send them to Point'^anx-Trembles and you 
will never regret it.'' Last .lanuary that man, came here with one of his 
boys and left him. For many days after that boy was .seen in a corner of the 
class-room weeping. He was a faithful Konmn ( atholic, and he felt sorry at 
seeing others n«)t wtnshipping (iod like him. Soon he understood the truth and 
the divine IJook became dear to him. lie wrote to his father saying: "I left 
home with my images, my beads, my scapulary and my superstitions, the.se things 
I have left behind. I will enter home with the (iosju'l." 

One hundred and Hf y-seven pupils were admitted this past .session ; eighty-six 
boy.s ami seventy -one girls; eighty of them belonged to lionnin Catholic homes. 

Eighteen of them confessed tht name of Christ and i»ecame members of the 
Church. Many ha\ '' returned to their parents, nominally Roman Catholics, with 
broader views, with a new light and willing and ready to defend and to testify for 
the good received at the I'ointe-aux-Trembles Schools. 

Our scho/;;rs have been active in the fulfdment of their duties. IVIanual work 
and lessons have been well attended to. Prayer meetings have been greatly 
blessed among the pupils; temperance work has been actively carried on, the 
members of the senior classes making stirring addresses, and warning their fellow 
•students ar^ainst the terriWe vice '>i*inteni[ierance. 

The Association of tho former and th*^ present pupils have again contributed 
$40.00 for i>rizes, and $5(».0() for books for the libraries. This is most helpful 
and sliniulating for the pu})ils. 

The scholars, though poor, are not unmindful of their duties, and, helped by 
their teachers, have coutribu^ed tlie sum of $15.00 towards the French Evangeliza- 
tion, $15.00 for the Century Fund, $15.0(» for the starving childien of India and 
$5.00 for the Foreign Missions. 

Three o'" our boys are going to work as colporteurs for the summer, and four 
girl.i lo teaci; in mission schools. 

The teaching staff was compo.sed of ^liss L. lladdow, directress, and the 
Misses V. (tiroulx, E. Hourgoin and A. Molleur, all former i)upils of the school, 
in the girl's school, and in the boy's school, Messrs. E. Brandt, S. Rondeau, B.A., 
and H. Joliat. 

The health of the pupils has been on the whole good. Teachers and scholars 
have been deeply grieved by the ]irolonged sickness of Principal Ronrgoin, ;in 
their turnest prayer has been that God may restore his strength and health for tlu 
continuation of the good work to which he has devoted his life. How glad the 
pupils weie to see before they left their beloved Principal once more in the chape 
to say good-bye and wish them all a hajipy return to their homes. 

We cannot close this short report without tendering our thanks to our 
numerous benefactors Avho have so faithfully provided for all our needs, and made 
possible this great work for freedom, for emancipation, for education, and the 
bigl. est welfare of our dear country. 

E. H. BRANDT, 

Acting Principal. 



Gait, 



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85 



POINTR-AUX-TKEMBLES srHUl.AHSHllU 



Tlu' IciUuwiiig ib 11 complete list of thu .scholaivhiiis received or promised : — 



From Con<fny(ili(iiiM miil Suhlxifli Schools. 



Acton, Out., Knox Ch. iind S. Scliool. 

Almonte, Ont., St. Andrew's. 
" St. John's. 

Amherst, N.S., St. Stephen's. 

Appleton, Out., St. Andrew's. 

Avonlmnk, Out. 

Ayr, Out., Knox. 

" Stanley Street. 

Miirrie, Ont. 

Burton, Ont., S.S. and C.E. Soe. 

Ik'lleville, Ont., John Street. 

H()wmanvHle,Out., St. Paurs(oiie-half). 

Hranipton, Ont. 

Brant ford, Ont., Zion. 

" First Church. 

Brock ville, Ont., First Church. 

" St. John's (one-half). 

Brookline, ^lass., Bethany. 

Brussels, Ont., Melville. 

Campbellford, Out. 

Campbelltown, N.B. (one-half). 

Carleton Place, Zion Juv. Miss. Band 

Carluke, Ont., St. Paul's. 

Charlottetown, P.E.I., Zion. 

Cobourg, Ont. 

Columbus, Ont. 

Cornwall, Ont., Knox. 

( \)te des Neigcs, Que. 

Dalhousie, N.B. (one-half). 

Dartmouth, N.S.,St. James' (one-half). 

Deseronto, Ont., ^fis.sion Band (one- 
half). 

Drummond Hill, Ont. 

Dundas, Out.. Happy Ws. Miss. Band. 

Elrasdale, Hants, N.S., Y.P.S.C.E. 

Flora, Ont., R:>ox S.S. & B. CI. (half). 

Ruglish River, Que. 

Farringdon, Ont. (two). 

Fergus, Out., Melville. 

" St. Andrew's. 

Gait, Out., Knox. 
" Central. 

(leorgetown. Que. 

Clace Bay, N.S. 

Goderich, Ont., Knox (one-half). 

Crreat Village, N.S. 

Guelph, Ont., Knox. 

Halifax, N.S., Fort Massey. 



<( 
Hamilton 

(( 



Halifax, N'.S.. Chahui'rs'. 

" St. Andrew's. 

Park Street. 
St. .Matthew's. 
Out., St. Paul's. 
Erskiiie. 
Knox. 
' Central. 
Hillsboro' and Mabou Village. N.S. 
Kingston, Out., Cooke's. 
Kirkton, Ont. (one-half). 
Kirkwall, Out., L.S. and Bible Class (one- 
half). 
Lachine, Que., St. Andrew's. 
Laketield. Ont. 
Lindsay, Out., St. Andrew's. 
Little Harbour, N.S. Sabbath Schools. 
Londou, Out., St. Andrew's. 
" First Church. 

Lucknow, Ont. (one-half). 
Lyn, Ont. 
Mayfleld, Ont. 
Montreal, Que. 



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Knox. 
St. Gabriel. 
Erskine. 
Calvin. 

St. Matthew's (two). 
Crescent Street. 
Nazareth Street (half). 
Chalmers. 

American Presby. Ch. 
Motherwell, Ont. 
New (Jlasgow, N.S., .Tanies. 

" United Ch. (tv/o). 

New Westminster. B.C., St. Audrew's. 
Norval, Out., S.S. and B.C. 
Norwood. Ont. (one-half). 
Ormstown, Que. Village. 

' ' l^pper and Lower. 

Ottawa, Ont., Knox. 

«« St. Andrew's. 

" St. Paul's Y.W. and Y. 

M.B. CI. 
" Stewarton. 

Paris, Ont. 

Pembroke, Out., Calvin. 
Perth, Ont., Knox. 
Peterborough, Out., St. Paul's. 



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Peterborough, Out., St. Audrew'H, Mrs. 

WjMUlell'H ClUHH. 

IMctou, N.S., I'rince Street. 

Port KIgin, Out. 

Portage la Prairie, Mau., Y.P.S.C.E. 

Port Hope, Out., First. 

Quebec, Que., Chalmers. 

Renfrew, Out., St. Andrew's. 

Sarnia, Ont. 

Seatbrth, Out., First. 

Shubeuacadie, N.S., Y.P.S.C.E. 

Wraith's Falls, Out., St. Paul's C.E.S. 

Stratford, Out., Knox. 

" St.Audrew'8(oue-half). 

Streetsville. Out. (one-half). 
Sydney, N.S., St. Matthew's. 
8t. Catharines, Out.. Hayes Ave. 
St. John, N.B., St. John's Y.P.S.C.E. 
St. Lambert, Que., St. Cuthbe.t's. 
i^t. Stephen, N.B., St. Stephen's. 
Thamesford, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont., Erskiue. 

West. 

St. Andrew's. 

Central. 

Knox. 

Knox Bible Class. 

Kut)X Happy Gleaners. 

St. John's (one-half). 

St. James' Scjuare. 

St. Mark's. 

Westminster. 

Cooke's (two). 

Bloor Street. 
First. 

First Y.P.S.C.E. i 
St. Andrew'. «. 
Valleyfield, Que. 
Vanleek Hill, Ont. (two). 
Westminster, Out., S. and N. 
We3f mount. Que., Melville. 
Williamstown, Out., St. Andrew's. 

" Hephzibah (one- 

half). 
"Winchester West, Ont.j 



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II 
11 
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II 
II 
II 
II 

Truro, N.S 

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Wiudsor, Out., St. Andrew's. 
Winnipeg, .Man., Knox. 

St. .\ndrew'8. 
Woodstock, Out., Knox. 
Woodville, Out. (one-half). 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Beauharnois, Que., Mr. and Mrs, J. W. 

Kilgour (two). 
Brantford, Out., Ignatius Cockshutt 

(ten). 
Brule and Middleton, N.S W.F.M. Union 

Society. 
Carletou Place, Out., Mr. N. M. Riddell. 
Carluke, Out., Mrs. A. S. Morton. 
Charlottetowu, P.E.I., Arch. Kennedy. 
English River, Que., Wm. Lang. 
Gait, Out., Knox Ch., W.H.M. Society. 
" " Mrs. Arthur 

Burnett. 
Georgetown and English River, Que., 

VV.F.M.S. 
Lachine, Que., T. A. Dawes. 
Montreal, Que., Mrs. Redpatb. 
" C. W. Davis. 

" Erskiue Ch. Ladies' Aid. 

New Glasgow, N.S., United Ch. Ladies' 

Aid. 
" J. W. Carmichael 

and P. A. Mac- 
Gregor. 
New York, U.S., H. E. Adriance i^oue- 

half). 
Ottawa, Out., A Friend. 
Paris, Out., Miss Margaret Curtis. 

" Mrs. .f. F. Boultbee (one 

half) 
Philadelphia, John H. Converse. 
Saratoga Springs, N.Y., Alanson Trask. 
Toronto, Out., Wm. Mortimer Clark. 
Williamson, Ont., Miss E. Johnson. 
Youngstowu, Ohio, John C. Wick. 



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FIELD UKPORTS. 



The following extracts IVoin ri-t-fnt rcportM of worktTH will convey nonjc idea 
of the nature and coiulitions of their work iu widely He|)arated Melds, 



DKHTBOYKR AND DIHTKIHUTOK. 

" In tlie parts of the co\intr\ where I have already gone over, many coljiorteui-fl 
it seems have passed before selling many bo(»kH. As is generally the case the priest 
has had them destroyed, and forbidden the people to buy any more upon the plea 
that they were Protestant and bad. In spite of such opposition, by reading the 
nicest cliapters of the New Testament, I intluenced many of them to take copicH. 
Some take copies without any hesitation and witiiout any urging on my part. One 
lady to whom I offered a New Testament said she had no money, otherwise she 
would take it. I told her if she wished to have it I would wait for the payment 
until I should pass her way again. She Haid, ' Will you do so? I am .so I'lad, and 
I promise you that even if I have to wear away my lingers in earning the necessary 
money I will do so.' Many similar incidents might be stated. These are encour- 
aging, but how numerous are the times when I am turned away and might be 
treated as the vilest of men if it were not known that I have the protection of the 
law." 

A StiiN OK I'KOGHKSS. 

" Since your visit here five more have been added to our little flo(!k, making 
twenty-six in all since last spring. They are making great progress, morally and 
spiritually. One little thing will help show this : J, L. has a great passion for 
hunting, and used to go on Sundays. Last Sunday a friend called in the afternoon 
and asked him to go. He answered, 'No, I cannot go, it is Sunday.' It was no 
doubt a great struggle for him." 

THK KORBIDDKR KOKHIDDEN. 

" Not being able to sell ray books, I went to the priest and asked him how it 
was that I couhi uot sell in his parish, and to kindly give me authorization that I 
might do so. He replied with a very pitiful air that he had forbidden his parish- 
ioners to buy, and as for an authorization, that was forbidden him by his superiors." 






•'«■ 



. 11 



THE PROFEHHIONAL MAN AND THE PRIEBT. 

" The other day I was in conversation with a notary of the place who said to 
me, ' My dear sir, don't think that we don't know that our clergy have departed 
from the truths of the Gospel. We know it too well. But we dare not say it. be- 
cause the priest would immediately hear of it, and as professional men we need 
their help. But a time is coming when there will be a radical change.' " 

TWO STANDPOINTS. 

" The priests here are furious and say that it is worse for the parents to send 
their children to our school than' it is to attend our services. In two or three cases 
the answer has been : ' Our children must learn the English language, and we 
want to know what Protestants believe, so we will go to their religious meetings.' 
May God enable us to act here with a large measure of wisdom and love." 

A PROMISE BROKEN. • 

"A woman promised with Imprecations that she would never attend our meet- 
ings, but her female neighbour brought her once, telling her that she would not 



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m 



88 

repent it. She was delighted and exclaimed afterwards: ' I heard a good sermon, 
and I have now proviniouH to nourish my soul for two weeks of the good things I 
heard, and I don't understand why our priest is afraid of this missionary.' " 



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THE people's protectors. 

' ' One of our French Protestant families having had the misfortune to have their 
huildings burne(| by the bush fires was mocked at and ridiculed by some of the 
l)eople who said, -What's the use of ministers? They cannot stop the fire. If 
you had only sent word to our priest you would have been spared.' While the 
fire was raging all around thev brought out their images and crucifixes and fixed 
them to the walls, and those who were not burned out talked highly of the 
miraculcnis virtues of these poor protectors, but not a .vord about God." 

; THE GOSPEL WINS. 

" During one of my visits at D I had tlie opportunity of seeing a dying 

J oung man to whom I talked of .Jesus and read the Gospe'. I asked the permission 
of his parents to pray, but they laughed at me. Then I said ' I will ask the sick 
man.' He answered affirmatively and earnestly. The priest had refused the day 
before to come and administer to him ' the last ritefe of the Church ' under the 
pretext that the roads were too bad. He came quickly tlie day after my visit. 
The young man died talking of the good things he had heard from ' the Gospel of 
a Protestant.' His sister afterwards ctnne to our meetings and told me how they 
had been persecuted for having receivea my visit at the death-bed of her brother ; 
' but I have learned,' said she, 'that truly it is possible to die in peace in your 
religion. Our priests don't talk of God's pardon and of heaven in such circum- 
stances, but are always in a hurry and do wlmt they are accustomed to do mechan- 
ically. I will study the Gospel now.' This same lady had on a former occasion 
refused a New Testament." 



■ i 



THREE VISITS AND VICTORY. 

" On my ."i- ~t visit at the house of Mr. S I was despised and insulted and 

abused. The second time they received me kindly and the master of tlie house was 
like another man. The words of the Gospel had evidently had some effect. I was 
armitted to read and speak and was listened to with astonishment. The third 
.ime I called I left a Bible atid shewed them that it was necessary to seek God's will 
in His Word and live in obedience to His Gospel rather than to the commandments 
of men. -Verily the entrance of Thy Word giveth light.' " 






THE HIDDEN LEAVEN. 

" Since I have been engaged in selling the Scriptures to the people of Quebec 
Province I have thought at times that I was doing a work with not much hope for 
the future. But I was mistaken. I recognize that I was, because I had at the 
beginning of this month the pleasure to meet with a man who received a copy of 
the Scriptures when he was in the States. He called me into his office saying, 
'Come and see what I have here.' Then he showed me a fine New Testament, 
and he added that not an evening since he possessed it, about ten years, had he 
missed to read a chapter or more. Well, that man is stiil a Roman Catholic by 
profession, but he knows better and he told me so ; but he keeps a grocery store 
and on that account has to keep quiet. Now who will tell me that the books I 
have placed do not count the same way, and do not give encouragement? Nobody. 
So we are sure the light is coming. It is break!" a- already, but surely in this place 
of N — surrounded with so many convents and colleges ; yes, even here it is begin- 
ning to shine, for people who one year ago thought that a hor.se had as much 
religion as " Protestant, know and acknowledge the contrary to-day." 



89 



SOWING THR GOOD SEED. 



" During this month we had the pleasure of again meeting that Roman Catholic 
family that was ready last summer to leave the Church of Rome but did not 

because of relatives. They asked me for another Bible, and went to W for a 

lew weeks, and they told me that many other people in W were asking for the 

Bible. A few weeks ago I had a meeting near Ste. C, and I have since learned that 
one of the Roman (-atholies who was present is coming to see me and bringing a 
dozen of his neighbcurs with him. One good seed will bring forth fruit in due time. 
I have had occasion this month to explain the Gospel to many Roman Catholics." 



r '- ■• 



PUBLICATIONS. 

Two i»apers, "Grateful French Canadian," prepared by Rev. R. 1'. Duclos. of 
Lacroix Church, Montreal, and "Our French Work," by Rev. C. A. Dondiet. of 
St. Charles Street Mission, Montreal, were published during the year in the I'rcs- 
byterian Record, and also in pamphlet form, and had thus a very large circulation. 

AH of which is ves])ectfully submitted. 



■ » 



Montreal, May £2nd, 1899. 



D. H. MacVICAR, D.I).. LL.D., Chairman. 
S. J. TAYLOR, M.A., 'vrelary. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath to the Treasurer, for the time being, of the Board ok French 
Evangelization of the Presbyterian Church in Canada, in trust for the said Board, 

the sum of 

to be paid out of my personal estate, without any deduction whatever : and I direct thai 
the receipt for the said sum of the Treasurer of the abore-named BoWil) of French 
Evangelization shall constitute and be sullicient discharge therefor. 




All contributions for French Evangelization and tlie Pointe-aux -Trembles 
Schools should be sent direct to the Treasurer, addressed Rev. Robt. IT. Warden, 
D.D., Confederation Life Building, Toronto. 



; 









.\-^:i: 








( ^t 








4 -M 




'■ .:;■;■■■ 




^ i.: ■ 




i- *'■' ' 




p ■' ' ^. . 




y :\i ' 





90 



BOARD OF FRENCH EVANGELIZATION OF THE 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 

IN ACCOUNT WITH REV. R. H. WARDEN. D.D., TREASURER. 
FOR THE YP:AR ENDING MARCH 31st. 19(10. 



I.— ORDINARY FUND. 

Receipts. 

By Balance on hand, April 1st, 1899 $1,864 65 

Congregational contributions $13,081 18 

Sabbath School " 613 78 

C. E. Societies " 192 22 

Donations, Sales of Books, etc 815 69 

Beque.sts 1,587 60 

Interest and Dividends 1,696 20 

Montreal Women's Missionary Society 200 00 

Presbyterian College. Montreal, interest Anderson 

Bequest 1,012 50 

Contributions from (rreat Britain 3,798 14 

22.997 31 

$24,861 96 
• Disbursements. 

To Salaries paid Missionaries, etc $19,930 42 

Salary British Agency 868 53 

Salary of Secretary 1,600 00 

Travelling expenses of Secretary 186 67 

Expenses of meeting of Board and Executive 134 30 

Rent, telephone, etc., Montreal office 106 99 

Calvin Church, Montreal, rent of Hall 50 00 

French Literature 73 71 

Interest on Mortgage, St. John's Church, and on 

advances 499 30 

Proportion of expenses, Committee on Y. P. Societies 20 00 

Rev. E. A. McCurdy, Halifax, on account salary . . 200 00 

Printing, including annual reports, etc., and postage 427 79 

Proportion of general expenses 450 00 

Balance on hand, April 1st, 1900 314 25 

$24,861 96 

II. — FRENCH EVANGELIZATION RK8ERVK FUND. 

By P. Peebles Fund $404 63 

R. Allan Fund 1,600 00 

T. Kirkpatrick Fund 1 ,000 00 

R. Anderson Fund 2.250 00 

Executors, J. Kelso, Countv Megantic, Que 900 00 

Executors, H. McDonald, Wolfe Island 1,900 00 $8,054 63 

To : Balance on hand, April 1st, 1900 $8,05463 



% 



'I 



n 



III. — J. a. ROSS FrxD. 
By Balance on hand, as at April 1st, 1899 

IV. — p. PEEBLES FUND. 

By Balance on hand, April 1st, 1899 " " 

To Transferred to Reserve Fund 

V. — R. ALLAN FUND. 

By Balance on hand, April 1st, 1899 

To Transferred to Reserve Fund 

VI. — T. KIRKPATRICK FUND. 

By Balance on hand, April 1st, 1899 

To Transferred to Reserve Fund 

VII. — R. ANDERSON FUND. 

By Balance on hand, April 1st, 1899 

To Transferred to Reserve Fund 

VIII. — POINTE-AUX-TREMBLES ORDINARY I FUND, 

By Balance on hand, April 1st, 1899 

Congregational contributions $8(59 87 

Sabbath School " 4.48152 

C.E. Societies, etc. " .- 259 03 

Donations 1.502 30 

Interest 34 38 

Montreal Woman's Missionaiy Society 200 00 

Tuition fees and sales \ 1.202 10 

Executors, Mrs. R. Phelp, England 1,312 50 

Executors, William Colquhoun, Cornwall, Ont 100 00 

Executors, J. R. McKeuzie, Kenyon, Ont 200 00 

Disbur8ement8. 

To Salaries paid Teachers, etc #2.818 35 

Butcher, $1,298.39 ; Baker, ^602. 99 1.901 38 

Grocer, $2,959.81 ; Hardware, Crockery, etc., 

$269.63 3,229 44 

Dry Goods, $148.29 ; Stationery, Postage, etc., 

$181.83 330 12 

Fuel 969 98 

Travelling Expenses, Principal, etc 76 53 

Repairs and Sundries 703 99 

Insurance 119 00 

Pt-oportion of general expenses 300 00 

Balance on hand, April 1st, 1900 330 87 



: 



$25,000 00 

• 

$404 63 
$404 63 

$1,000 00 
11,600 00 



$1,000 00 
$1,000_00 

$2,250 00 
$2,250 00 



$618 46 



10.161 20 



$10,779 66 



I 

■i 




$10,779 66 



92 



IX. — POrNTK-AUX-TRKMHLK8 REKERVK FUND. 

By Balance on hand, April 1st, 18!)9 $7,045 00 

. Executors James Kelso, County ]Mc}j;antic, (Jue... . 000 00 

$7/J4r) 00 

To Balance ou hand, April 1st, 1900 $7 .945 00 

BALANCE SHEET. 

APIUL, 1900. DR. CR. 

Ordinary Fund !?;}14 25 

Ordinary Reserve Fund 8,tt54 (iJi 

Pointc-aux-Trembles Ordinary Fiii;d '.VM) 87 

Pointe-aux-Trembles Reserve Fun^l 7,945 00 

J. G. Ross, Quebec, Fund 25,000 00 

Coligny College. Ottawa $25,000 00 

Lambton L. & I. Co 1,600 00 

C.C. Bonds 10,400 00 

Balance, Cash in Bank 4,644 75 

$41,644 75 $41,644 75 
Toronto, April 27th, 1900. 

I have audited the books of Rev. 11. H. Warden, D.D., Treasurer of the French 
Evangelization Fund for the year ending March 31st, 1900, and have examined 
the vouchers connected therewith, and certify theiu to be correct. 

I also certify that the foregoing balance sheet is in accordance with the books 
of account. 

ANDREW .lEFFREV, 

Toroiito, May 5th, 1900. " Auditor. 



IV, i: 




'' i 



m 



V 



KKPORT OF THE 



FOREIGN MISSION 
1899-1900. 



COMMITTEE, 



I.— MISSIOX TO THE NEW HEBRTDES. 



Ir<lauil. 



3Iissiouarv. 



Date of 



No. of 

. . , . Native 
Ai)i)ointment ^j , 
' ' Helpers 



Efate Rev. J. W. MaoKeuzie . 

EiToinauga ^ " H. A. Robertsor 

Santo 



" Joseph Aimand, D.I). 



1872 
1872 
1873 



11.— MISSION TO TRINIDAD. 



Station. 



Tunapuna . . 

St. Joseph . . 
Caroui 



Missiortaries. 



Rev. J. Morton, D.I). 
" Harvey Morton 
" Paulliukhan... 
" A. Gavadeen . . 



Canadian 
Teacher 



Native Assistants. 



adder 



San Fernando , 



Diamond . . . 
Priucetown . 



Couva 



2 ( Rev. R. J.drant, 

1^ D.D 

I [ Rev. S. A. Eraser 

Rev. Lai Behari . . . . 



Rev. D. Ujagarsin"; 
Rev. W. L. .Macrae 



Miss 



A. J. 

Archibald 



Miss C.Sinclair 



Rev. A. W. Thompson 



Miss A. Black-iClnharja Li la, John Lutchman 
Sin^-, Heni'y Hanuman, R. 
]Mahepot, Bennie Lala, Wra. 
Prithiwi Lai, G. W. Chan- 
dising, I). Lakhan, Jo.seph 
Gibbings, Paul Kassie, De- 
borah Talarara, Hannah Bat- 
too, p]llen Abbot, A. Lala, 
Anna Mewa. 

A. Girdhari. A. Ramrarayan, 
T. Bissesar, Ishmael, Rame- 
sar Cludi, Lochan Mathura, 
Jaikaram, Kangaloo, Radi- 
kisun, Lackan, Khuldeep, 
Kalipha, Matadeen, Ranikai, 
(Bessie Girdhari, Mary .Jclan' 
Jaiie Jelan and S. Siboo, 
Bible Women.) 

('. C. Soudcen, ]\Iehendibeg, 
lliomas Padarath, Charles 
Sewcharau, James Gaugana- 
I'ain, John Khrisnanand, Na- 
than Gopi, Philip Kasi, An- 
drew Mukiiaud, John ]VIodi, 
J. R. Ganesh, Edward Ram- 
narayan, S. B. Ramrattan, 
Birju, Fred Chamausing, .Tos. 
Sumden. Colin Paraping, .Tob 
Tuphai, Mrs. Palia Jagrnp, 
Mrs. S. A. Rimjah, Jlrs. 
Mehendebeg. 

Jeremiah Bhola, Andrew But- 
an, George Jagarnath. John 
J(, hii, James Joy.dii, W. L. 
Juttlan, Aquila Ritpchand, 
Simon Sewbarath, F. W. 
Tarmohamraed Habel Abiel, 
(J. Girao, E. Madoo, Mrs. E. 
Jutlaji, Mrs. Amelia Besses- 
sir, Lardh Ll'jidnk, Ladv 

.Tolchll. 



]Miss L. Fisher 




!'■ 



■•''1 



>. »■ 



ftl- .■ 





94 

DEMERARA. 



Station . 


Missionary. 


Canadian 
Teacher. 


Native Assistants. 


Better Hope 

Estates . . 


Rev. G. G. Ross . . 




Rameshewar Maharaj and 
others. 




f 



III.— KOREA. 

Rev. R. Grierson, B.A., M.I) Wonsan. 

Rev. W. R. Foote, B. A •' 

Rev. D. MacRae. B. A " 



NORTH-WEST. 

P. O. Address. 
. . . Mistawasis, Sask. 



IV.— MISSION TO THE INDIANS IN THE 

Mission. Staff. 

Mistawasis Rev. W. S, Moore, B.A., Missionary 

" Miss Kate Gillespie, Teacher " 

Makoce Waste, ) Miss Lucy M. Baker, Teacher Prince Albert 

(Prince Albert) j Miss Bell Lyttle, Assistant *' 

Regiua Rev. A. J. McLeod, B.A., Principal .... Regina, Assa. 



Sask. 



.Mr. Alex. Skene ) 



;• Assistants , 



" Mr. Hugh Stewart ] 

" Mrs. H. Stewart, Matron " 

" Miss M. Nicoll, Teacher " 

File Hills Rev. R. H. Farrier J't. Qu" Appelle, Assa. 

Round Lake Rev. Hugh McKav. Missionary Whitewood, Assa. 

•' Mrs. H. McKay, Matrcii " 

** Mr. Jacob Bear, A.sst. Missionary " 

" Mr. G. W. Sahlwark, Teacher " ' 

Crowstand Rev. N. Gilmour, Missionary Crowstand, Assa. 

^' Miss .1. Gilmour, Matron " 

*' Miss Josephine Petch, Teacher " 

*' Miss Sarah Dunbar, Asst. Matron " 

Birtle Mr. W. J. Small, B.A., Teacher Birtle, Man. 

' ' Miss Annie McLaren. Matron " 

'• Miss M. McLeod, Asst. Matron " 

Bird Tail Rev. .John McArthur, Missionary Buelah, Man. 

Okanase Mr. R. C. McPherson, Miss'n'ry & Teach'rElphinstone, Man. 

" Mrs. R. C. McPherson, Asst. Teacher ... 

Rolling River Mr. W. J. Wright, Missionary '.>iinnedosa, Man. 

Portage la Prairie. Miss Annie Eraser, Matron Portage la Prairie, Man 

" .Miss Bell 

" .Mrs. Sutherland, A.sst. Matron " 

Pipestone Mr. John Thunder, Missionary Pipestone, Man. 

Hurricane Hills. . .Rev. Ewen McKenzie, Missionary Sintaluta, Assa. 

Lizard Point Rev. David Cattauach. Missionary Rossburn. Man. [As.«a 

Moose Mountain . .Mr. F. D. Dodds, Missionary Cannington Manor, 

Lakcsend Mr. C. H. Monro, Missionary Ft. Qu* Appelle, Assa. 

Long Plain Mr. Robt. McKay, Missionary Swan Lake, Man. 

Valley River Rev. R. J. Ross, Missionary Glenlyon, Man. 

Lake ofthe Woods. Rev. A. G. McKittrick, Missionary Keewatin, Ont. 



Station. 

Tamusi 

(N. Formosa) . . 



v.— MISSION TO JAPAN. 

FORMO.SA. Arrived. 

. . Rev. G. L. MacKay, D.D December, 1871 

. *Rev. W. Gauld November, 1892 

Rev.. Giam Chheng Hoa Ordained Native Preacher. 

With 60 unordained native pi'eachers. 



96 



■?: 






Station. 



VI.— MISSION TO CHINA. 



HONAN. 



Arrived. 



€hu Wang Mr. Wm. McClure, B. A., M.D October 4th, 1888 

" . . Rev. Murdoch McKen/ie November 8th, 1889 

<« Miss Margaret I. Mcintosh November 19th, 1889 

" Miss Jennie I. Dow, M.B November 9th, 1895 

" Mr. Percy ('. Leslie, M.D November 7th, 1897 

Hsin Chen Mr. Wm." Malcolm, M.D October 15th. 1892 

<' *Kev. W. Harvey Grant, B. A October 19th, 1892 

J. A. Simmon March, 1895 

R. A. Mitchell, B. A September 20th, 1885 

.Jonathan Goforth March 2nd, 1888 

.lames Menzies, M.D November 9th, 1895 

, Miss Mina A. Pyke October 10th, 1896 

Rev. D. McGillivray, M.A., B.D December 1st, 1888 

, Rev. John Griffith. B. A November 7th, 1897 

.Miss Mars?aret Sterling Wallace, M.D September 18th, 1898 

Rev. T. C. Hood, B. A May 18th, 1899 

.Rev. J. R. Harcourt, B.A 



" Rev. 

" Rev. 

Chang Te Fu Rev. 

•' Rev. 



a 

H 



VII.— MISSION TO CENTRAL INDIA. 



Station. 



ludore *Rev. J. Wilkie. M.A 

" Rev. A. P. Ledingham, B. A. . . 

" Rev. J. T. Taylor, B. A 

" Miss Marion Oliver, M.D 

" Miss J. V. Sinclair 

" : Mi.ss Janet White 

'' Miss Jessie Grier ; 

" fMiss Bella Ptolemy 

" fMiss Rachel Chase, B. A 

" Miss Harriet Thomson 

Mahow fRev. N. H. Rus.sell, B.A 

•' fRev. J. Fraser Smith, M.D 

■' Miss Bessie Goodfellow 

Neemuch Rev. W. A. Wilson, M.A 

" Miss Margaret McKellar, M.D. 

« +Miss A. Turnbull. M.D. 

** *Miss .Jessie Duncan 

** Miss Catharine Campbell 

Rutlam Rev. J. F. Campbell 

Ujjain *Mr. C. R. Woods, M.D 

" Mr. Alex. Nugent, M.D 

" Miss M. Jamiesou 

'' Miss .Je.ssie Weir 

Dhar *Rev. F. H. Russell, B.A 

'• Miss Margaret O'Hara, M.D. . 

Anikhut Rev. .J. Buchanan, B.A., M.D. 



Arrii'ed. 




December, 


1879 


November, 


1 895 


May, 


1899 


.January, 


1886 


'• 


1889 


November, 


1893 


I i 


1893 


a 


1895 


i i 


1895 


December, 


1897 


i; 


1890 


u 


189*^ 


May, 


1899 


December, 


1894 


October, 


1890 


November, 


1892 


a 


1892 


December, 


1894 


u 


1876 


u 


1893 


May, 


1899 


November, 


1889 


December, 


1896 


November, 


1893 


December, 


1891 


i k 


1888 



VIII.— MISSION TO CHINESE IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Station. Arrived. 

Victoria Rev. A. B. Winchester April, 1892 

Vancouver Mr. C. A. Coleman September, 1893 

Union Mines Mr. L. W. Hall 1895 

*Home on furlough, 
t Sick leave. 







1 

i 


I'i 



■if .11 




i \ 







• 


,. -. p ' 


r -ni' . 


■ > 


' 


'. ■')(,; 


I" 


1 .f\ 


1 . 


\':-% 




! ' , K'l 


\0' 


'"'■■ !''*' 


■'v;ti. ■ 


i"-^^. ■•• 


K f'sr 


'■i- 


:^M- 




■*<>! ■ 




'f 


^i4- 


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96 



IX. -MISSION' TO LXDIANS IX BHIT18II COLUMBIA. 
Station. Arrived. 

Alberiii Mr. J. U. Motion August, 18!Mt 

•• ISlis 

" I8!t.-. 

Mav. ISit.-. 



" Mrs. K. Cameron 

Ucluelct ]Mis8 V). ^Nlay Armstrong 

Ahousalit Mr. J. W. Rus.^ell 

Dodger's Cove 

(Olilahts) .Mr. M. Swartout February. 1S!H 

<' Mr. Alex. McKee Marcli. iSlt'.i 

X.— M "^K)^- ) CF' 7ESE IN QUEBEC AND ONTARIO. 

Station. Arrived. 

Montreal Ct •* i. L'. Thomson, M.D November, 1894 



It's- 



II' 1 
If- 

I'' 




FOREIGN MISSIONARIES WHO HAVE RETIRED OR HAVE BEEN 

CALLED AWAY BY DEATH. 



Rev, 



u 

I i 
u 



Rev. 

(I 

(I 

1 '. 



John Geddie, D.]1., 
Gecn-ge N. Gordon . . 

J. W. Metheson 

S. F. John.ston 

Donald MorrLson . . . 
James D. Gordon . . . 
William McCullagh 

James McNalr 

John Goodwill 

James D. ^Murray . . 



NEW JIEHRIBKS. 

Designated. 
184H 
180,") 
1857 
1855) 
18(53 
18fi3 
1863 
1S0() 
1869 
1872 



Hetired 



TRINIDAD. 



Thomas Christie 
J. W. McLeod . . 
J. K. Wright . . . 
F. S. Coffin 



Mr 



John A. McDonald 

" A. Campbell 

Miss Semple 

Copeland 

Hilton 

Minnie Archibald . 

Graham 

Kirki)atrick 



(I 

u 



1873 

1880 

1883 

1889 

Missionary Teachers. 
1875 

1880 

1883 

1884 

1884 

1886 
1889 

1891 



DEMERARA. 



Rev. J. Gibson 



1884 



INDIA. 

Rev. George Stevenson 

Miss Fairweather 

' ' Rodger 

" Forrester (now Mrs. Eraser 
Campbell) 



1876 



1866 

1874 
1876 

1883 

1888 
1894 

1877 
1881 
1889 
1889 
1886 

1891 
1896' 



1857 


1858 


1873 


1880 


1873 


1891 



Died. 

1872 
1861 
1862 
1861 
1869 
1872 

1870 



1886 



1881 



1888 



07 



INDIA — Contiiutetl. 

Designated. 

Rev. J. M. Douglas 187(1 

Miss M. McGregor 1877 

Rev. Joseph Builder, B..\ 1888 

" R. C. Murray, B.A 188.') 

" G. McKelvic, M.A 1888 

Miss Amv Harris 1889 

" Elizabeth Realty, M.D. . . . 1884 

" E. B. 8cott 1888 

" M. McKay (now Mrs. Bu- 
chanan) 1888 

" Elizabeth McWilliams ... . 18!»1 

" W. Grant Fraser 1890 

Mr. J. J. Thompson, M.D 1895 

Miss I. Ross 1883 

Rev. W. J. Jamieson 1890 

Miss Catherine Calder 1892 

" Mary Charlotte Dougan . . 189.'^- 

" Jean M. Leyden 189ti 

HONAN. 

Rev. John McDougall 188/ 

" J. H. MacViear, B.A 1889 

Miss Jennie Graham 1889 

" Harriet R. Sutherland 1888 

" Lucinda Grahiim. M.D. .. 1892 

Rev. Kenneth McLennan, B.A. 1894 

FORMOSA. 

Rev. J. B. Fraser, M.D 1874 

" K. F. Junor 1878 

" John Jamieson 1883 



' .-k 



Heiired. 


Died. 


1882 




1888 





• • • • 


1888 


• < 1 • 


1887 


1891 






1892 


1892 


• < ■ • 


1890 


. . . . 


• 


■ • » ■ 


1893 




I89(i 




"1*7 




i-i 




1 • 




M^\)v 




' 900 




1900 




1893 




1895 


• • • • 


1 8i)0 


* • > * 


18S9 






1897 



1877 
1882 



1894 



1891 



SALARIES OF IMISSIONARTES AND NATIVE HELPERS. 

N'OTa.— The provisions which tho Churcli makes for her Missionaries is fixed upon the principle of 
Riving only what is necess^ary for comfort and health, so that their salaries vary in'difTerent 
countries, according to the expense of living. Tho salary of the Missionary begins^when he 
reaches his field of labour, and ceases when he leaves it. . " 

FORMOSA. 

1. Male Missionary (married). .$1,400 and $40 per child per annum. 

2. " " (unmarried) 1,000 per annum. 

3. Pastors (native) 20 per month. (^lexiean.) 

4. l-reachers from $5 to $11 per month. (Mexican.) 

5. Students, for preaching 4 per month. (Mexican.) 

6. Bible Women 3 per month. (Mexican.) 

HONAN, 

1 . Male Missionary (married) . . $1,200 per annum, and $40 per child per ann\im. 

2. " " (unmarried) 500 to 800 per annum. 

3. Unmarried Women 500 per annum. 

4. Helpers 48 per annum. 

CENTRAL INDIA. 

1. Male Mi.ssionary (married).. $1,200, and $100 per child, and $140 hill 
expenses, per annum. 

i 





98 

2. Mull' MisHJoiiary unimurriod) 800 and $!•() hill expenses per anninn. 

.'i. I innarried wonn n 7:^0 per annum. 

4. Vernacular initive teacher (heathen) $22 to !j<;?4 per iinnutn. 

r>. " " (Christian) oO to 100 " 

(). '• catevhist. Hil)le reader no to 100 " 

7. University underjjraduates able to teach English 150 to 2.')0 " 

8. " <jradnates <' " 2(iO to 420 " 
». <;raduati^ ol' Agra Medical ('ollegi^ 170 

10. Women teachers, lower {^rade 20 to 2') " 

11. Hihle women, " 20 to 25 " 

12. Wonjcn teachers, higher grade 28 to .S2 " 

\'.\. Hiole women, " 28 to M2 <' 

14. Hiad Mistresses. .$.S2 to !?80 according to (lualification and grade of school. 

15. Medical .Assistants $120 to $200 per annum. 

1(). .Medical Matrons 100 to 120 " 

17. Diitloniaed Mi<hvives 100 to 120 " 

18. Nurses in Training 20 to 82 " 

19. Dispensers, Dressers and Compounders 20 to 32 ■" 

20. Servants Ki to 24 " 

CHINKSIC, nUITISIl C'OLITMBIA. 

1. Ordained Missionary $1,(500 per annum and free house. 



MANITOBA AND NORTH-WEST. 

Salary determined by Western|Division of the Committee when the appoint- 
ment is made. 

N.B. — Married Missionaries to Formosa, flonan, and Central India get an 
outlit allowance of $250 and travelling expenses to the field. Single Missionaries 
receive $150 for outlit allowance, besides travelling expenses. Medical Mission- 
aries may receive an allowanci' for books, medicines, instruments, etc., which are 
the pr()perty of the ^lission. Missionaries to Manitol)aand the North-we.st receive 
tra\ elling expenses, ;\Iale Missionaries on furlough receive at the rate of $750 per 
annum if married, and $500 if single. Lady 3Iissionaries on furlough receive $300 
per annum. 

TRINIDAD. 

1. Ordained Missionary $1,4(50 00 ])er annum. 

2. Lady Teachers 400 00 " 

3. Native Ministers 48fi (5(5 " 

4. Catechists 120 00 to $800 " 

5. Bible Women, $24 to $i)(5 per annum, according to the time she can give 

and her ability. 

6. Native Teachers, $192 to $216 per annum (salary fixed by Government and 

bonuses on yearly examination), 

7. Pupil Teachers and Seamstresses $24 to $(50 per annum. 

NEW HEBRIDES, 

1. Missionary $978.88 per annum and $48 for each child under 16 years. 

2. Native Teachers, etc.. $80 per annum. 

KOREA. 

1. Missionary $1,000 per annum. 



m 



I._XH:w HEHllIDES. 



TluTc is not murh tluil is uiiusuiil to rojH)!! in connection with tlit-worlc in the 
New llei)ri(les. Tlie woik of our missionaries in the New Hebrides Inis been eiuir- 
ucteri/ed l)y sustained aetivity und aeeonipanied l»y (juiet and steady pro^resH. 
Their healtli has been fairly good, tliough some of tliem have sull'ered from sickness, 
and disease and deatii have swept away many of tlieir people, umon^ whom were 
not a few of their most active aud usel'ul members. 

ERU()MAN(i.\. 

With reference to the work on this island, Mr. Robertson reports as follows : — 

Schouln. — Mucli close attention has been given to teaching, and more especially 
at the two central stations, where classes have been conducted ilaily, with the ex- 
ception of Saturdays, and the progress of the children and young people has been 
most encouraging, apd more tinin in any former year have the parents and friends 
of the children helped us in getting the child.<'n and young people to attend regu- 
larly the classes provided for tliem. 

Perhaps the only (Irawl)ack of any importance to the jjrogress of the Mission 
on Erromanga now is the (Queensland labor trallic. So many young men and Itoys 
liave gone to (Queensland, and so many are anxious to go, that we lin(i that in most of 
the districts the most hopeful class of our people are either away, or unsettled, and 
so we are discouragetl in our ellorl., to impi'rt a more thorough education to our 
young people than they have hitherto enjoyed. 

The Lord's Supper has been disiicnsed Hve times during the Sy nodical year, 
and each time at a ditl'erent district. Three years ago we began to press upon our 
Dillon's liay jtt'ople, who can i' m1 well, the great benelit to tliemselves that would 
result if they would commit to memory a Ciospel. A number began to do so. I 
selected the (iospel by John, and (piitc a numl)er are now well on with that (Jospel, 
and a few have finisheu it and liave begun Mark. 

For many years I have l)cen engaged in translating i)ortionsof the New Testa- 
ment and have given as much time to this important work as other work that 
could not have been neglected without injury lo the mission, would permit. In 
1878 I printed 1,000 co])ies of the Acts of the .Vpostles. in Sydney ; in 1884 an 
equal number of coi)ies of Matthew and Mark, in Toronto, and in 181)0, 2.000 cojties 
of the four Gospels aud the Acts, in Sydney. Besides these we have had four edi- 
tions of our Catechism and Hynuial printed in the islands and at Sydney, from 
time to time, as we added new matter and former editions were exhausted. What- 
ever printing was done in the islands for us, was done without money and without 
price, by Messrs. Paton, Watt, Annand, Laurie, and (Junn. 

Any editions of our Hymnal and Catechism printed and bound in Sydney we 
have paid for out of proceeds of our mission arrowroot, prepared annually by our 
better class of Christian natives. 

All portions and books of the Scriptures we have ha<l printed, were printed 
and bound at the expense of the British and Foreign Bible Society in London, in 
the tirs*^ instance, aud we have refunded the whole sum, with the exception of £30, 
which this noble society generously de<lucted when we made our last payment of 
the balance due on the edition of the Gospels and Acts. 

The Bible Society also printed Genesis aud Matthew for James D. Gordon as a 
free gift, for at that time there were few Christians on Erromonga to help. 

During the past year I have been enabled to give a considerable portion of the 
forenoons of four days of each week when not visiting district .schools and settle- 
ments, to the most important work I can now do for the firm establishmen . and 
permanence of the mi.ssion on Erromanga, namely, completing the tran.slation of 
the New Testament. And my special object in coming *o Sydney at this time is to 
finish and revise and transcribe that work and have it printed directly under my 
own personal superintendence, and I can do all this much better here than on 



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100 

ErroiuaiiKU. I fuel tlmt woo is mi' if I do not ^ivii the KrroniaiiKunH the entire New 
Testiiiufiit, niid tlmt no lunoiinl ol ^t>ncral niisHioimry work, not even the ineucliinK 
oftlio (fospel. ciiii supply th«' lurk now of the written Wonl of (ioil in iiuihlin^i; up 
and estiiltlisliin^ the [leople in the I'ailli. 

I therefore feel tlmt " This one ihin^ I do." A duty too lon^ ilelayed, and 
the only duty as reKurds Hrronmnga und the Krronmnifans, that I reproach niyHclf 
for not doing, hut hitherto 1 have heen hindered. This ha.s not been aeeording to 
my heart, hut no one man can do i'\erythin>^, and jierhaps as I now know the 
Erionmnyan lanj^uage better than I did some years ago, the work will ht^ better 
and more nearly eor/vet than if It had been done earlier. And how <tur bettiir men 
and women are now fairly hunj^erin^; for this preeious treasure! 'i'his too urjjes 
me forward in the work, at once dillieult, laborious ami intensely intereslinv;. 

I have just (Completed arraii>j;ements with the Hible Society to have the com- 
plete New Testament in Krnmianpm printed and bound here in Sydney, under 
their auspices, and for them and ai their expense, the Society allowing nu' to refund 
the whole co.st of printing and binding, year by year, as we may be able to prejtare 
an<l dispose of arrowroot lor that purpose, after jiaying the .salaries of our own 
teachers on Erromanga. 

Wc shipped '_'.()()() pounds of arrowroot in August, in the steamer ''Thermoiiy- 
lea '' of the White Star liine. That line steamer was wrecked on thai homeward 
voyage and our arrowroot was lost, but fortunately Dr. Cosh had insured it. a.s he 
always does for me. and the amount, about ClOO sterling, when recovered by Dr. 
Cosh's agents in London, will form our first iH'fund to the iJritish and Foreign 
Bible Society toward the cost of printing and l»indiiigthe New Testament, and that 
we may lind it impossible to apply the money to the Teachers' Fund, or to any 
other object on Erromanga however good in itself, T am asking Dr. Co.sh to write 
to liondon at once, instructing that the whole of this intSurance money be immedi- 
ately paid to the \V\h\v Society as [ have indicated, and gradually, as our constant 
friend, Mr. Harnett of (.'lasgow, can find a market for our arrowroot, we will reduce 
the l)ali>nce till we shall, T trust, pay off every shilling of it. INFr. Barnett finds 
much more dilliculty now than formerly in disposing of our arrowroot as so nmny 
other New ITebrides missionaries are sending arrowroot to Scotland, but in a recent 
letter to me Mr. Barnett says he will do his best to find a market for INIr. ^lacKenzie's 
arrowroot and mine. What a friend Mr. Barnett has been in helping us in this 
way for many years ! Indeed, but for his help we never could have disposed of 
our arrowroot. 

T am (]uite resolved, for their own real and i>ermanent good, that the Christian 
natives of Erromanga shall now and henceforth pay their own teachers on their 
own island. I do feel that the Canadian Church shouhl now be relieved of the ex- 
pense of the Erromangan mission to that extent. 

Our Erromangans are very fiir from being a rich people. Even as we under- 
stand the term in reference to native races. They are among the i)Oorest in the 
group, as their island has few, very few, co(^oanuts upon it. But that is the peojde's 
fault, for not planting them, as the soil will grow anything which can be grown in 
the tropics anywhere. Yet they are not j)oor, and where there is the will there is 
always the way ; and since they can and do spend money for tobacco, guns, hair 
oil, perfumeries, and upon too much heavy needless clothing in such a warm 
climate, and ujion other fooli.sh things ; I have no hesitation in pressing upon them 
their duty as jirofessed Christians to sui)port entirely and freely and ungrudgingly 
and sy.stematically their own faithful and hard working tea< i'.crs. And if they will 
not do so then they shall not have them, for after years of thought and prayer and 
planning in connection with this important department of ttie work, my wife and 
I have come to the conclusion that the time has fully come when the Erromangans 
should support all native helpers on their own island, build and keep in repair all 
the native-made school houses and churches, and paying for all their own books, 
including the complete New Testament, and that to keep the Christians of our 
island any longer in swaddling-bands would only prolong their heli)lessuess and 
foster the natural sellishness of the human heart. 

When T paid the teachers at the close of the sacrament at the end of April 



101 



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(IS!ti»), I (lislinclly told tln>iii, llrinly l»ul kiiully. tliiit tliat was the last inonry tlu'y 



k'ouhl evt'i" ncoix e from tlu' I'lt'sliytoriaii ("liiirdi in <'aiia<la as sa 



lari 



CH, mill 



that 



we iiiiiHl now look to the pooiilo tlhMiiH«>lveH tor their Hiipporl. I lia<i aiiiiotiiirt'*! 
this till) previous cvciiinn ut tlic rios*- of'oiir (>osp»'l niecliiiK to over I, (MM) people, 
Iiu'IikIIiik >IM) chiireh iiieiiil*ers, aixl we must ^o forward in this mattt-r. 

Our owu feeling is one of the lU-epi'st j^ralituile to ("-od. who has niven us tho 
victory in (tontrihutiiiK, on our In-loved lOrromanKa, this year. £100 iu cash, and 
arrowroot to the value of at least C'20{) more, thus lieadin^j; the list for the whole 
jri'dup for thin year at the time of our synod, in June last. I do t hank ( iod for sup- 
jiorlin^ and hlessin^ niy ell'orts apiinst heavy odds on iM'roumnpt in this nmtter. 

.1 Vrtir of I'niifirnH. — With the exception oftlu' sickness and mortality on the 
i>l:n)d and the untoward outconu^ of the (jueenslaiul lahour trallic, diainin;; our 
field of so larj^e a proportion of our ahle-hodied, strong yoiiii^ men and lads, I 
rcRard our twenty-seventh year of missionary lahoiirs a very sueeessful one upon 
the whole. One of the most solid proofs of this statement is that fact, aliH-ady 
referred to, viz., the amount given hy the natives for the support and extension of 
the (M)spt'l. Another evidence is that never iiefore have parents and friends <d' the 
liltle children taken such a lively interest in the education and jj;eiieral improve- 
ment of the children committed to their care, and this we have found to help is 
immensely in our classes at the leadiujj; central station, Dillon's Hay. in which oi.r 
second daughter has taught for over four years and our third ilaugl tcr nearly one 
year. Still another point of eneouragmeut and comfort to myself is that during 
the past three years f have had all my hitherto multifarious work hetter in hand 
than during any other period since our settlenieiit on tlu- island more than twenty- 
seven years ago. 

Sidlixlies, — Missionary, 1 ; teachers, IJO ; elders, IS ; teachers and servants 
helping other missionaries, 12; church iiu'mhers, '.VM\ : marriages. 12; population 
ill July. I8!)8, l,.'j(M); contiihutioii for 'reaehers' Fund, in cash t7-' ; from proceed.s 
of arrowroot for Teacher's Fund, 1128; total, t'lOO; arrowroot prepared for mis- 
sion, 5, (MM) pounds, value iu cash !?20() : making total eoiitrihutioiis C'AOi) sterling 
for the whole year, an average of nearly $5 i»er communicant, or $1 each for every 
man, woman and child on the island. 

The Committee have been pleased to welcome Mrs. Robertson on furlough, 

11(1 rejoict! to kn()w that her health has imjiroved by her visit to her native land, 

and that she expects shortly to return to her island home where they trust she may 

long be spared to eoiitiniie her toil in the work in which she and her husband have 

been so long and faithfully engaged. 



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Kl-'ATIC. 

Mr. MacKeuzie writes as follows for 181)9 : 

In reporting for another year I would express gratitude to God for our health 
as a family. Almost the only exception to this is an attack of measles which our 
little b has had, and from which he is slowly recovering. This disease was 
l)rouglu .lere in .June by a (Queensland labour vessel, and has spread over a large 
portion of the group. There have been no deaths from it among our jieople so far, 
but several >f the natives have been carried otf by it on otlu-r islands. We have 
been somewhat in dread of the bubonic plague breaking out li('!'i>, as there is 
constant communication between this and Noumea, where it iias beea raging for 
some time. 

On account of family matters I foeml it necessary to iii:ike a hurried lip to 
Sydney iu July. ]Mr.s. MacKenzie carried on the wdrk in ni ,' absence. 

Although during the year many things happened wliieb sorely grievcn i> and 
tried our patience, yet on the whole the work has. I belie,' , made good i*ii.gress. 

One thing that saddened us very mucli was that one of our ytung men from 
Erakor. the smartest native I ever taught, and one whom we all were i)roud of, 
was sent home from Malekuhi in disgrace. He liud been out as a teacher on that 
island for several years, and it was so gratifying to receive such good reports of 
him from yenrtoyeai' from the missionary under whom he was labouring. It gives 



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102 




us some comfort, however, that iinmediati'ly after liis fall he confessed his siu, and 
appears ever since to he deeply penitent. Another case tliat deeply grieved lu 
was that of a young man whom we hai)tized and admitted to the Lord's t!.'.>lc, 
while at the same time he knew he was f^uilty of sin. A few days after ne Com- 
munion it was found out that he had stolen a sum of money from i native of 
another island, who had been away in Australia for several years, hut had recently 
come to live at this young man's village. The chief and the rest of the natives 
were very much ashamed that one of their number should treat a stranger 
who had come among them in this manner, so they held a meeting and raised 
among them the part of the money he had spent- part of it he had restored, 
and then they took away his property and compelled him to go and work 
fo; one of the settlers until he should earn suthcient to relinid them. 

There are no longer any heathen in our district to be bi-ought in, hence, owini; 
to the nature of the work progress must be sfow. When they are coming in and 
giving up their old customs, from naked i>ainted savages becoming apparently 
devout worshippers, decently clothed, and attending church and school regularly, 
the progress seems to be by leaps and bounds. But after t\w novelty has worn oil 
and the majority of the adults have lieen baptized and admitted to the Church, it 
is uphill work, and one is apt to feel at times a little disheartened, seeing it 
advance so slowly. But like the risi'ig tide, receding but ever advancing, the 
good work, notwithstanding many discouragements, is making steady progress. 
The high death rate is, I may say, a particularly discouraging feature of the work. 
Still, at .some of our villages, especially at Mele, Pango and Erakor, we have a tine 
lot of children. 

The exemplary conduct of the people of this village merits special mention. 
Besides supplying us gratis with all the yams we recjuirtl for our table, they have 
kei)t the fence aroiuul our premises in repair, as well as those around the church 
and school, and have been most hearty in any work connected with the ^lission, 
such as boating, preparing arrowroot, etc. Then besides contributing liberally (or 
seats for their new church, of which they are very proud, and paying the salary 
of their teacher, they built him a substantial lime cottage of three rooms. At Mele, 
too, we have had much to encourage. Early in the year they elected a new chief, 
those who were chiefs in heathenism having resigned in his fiivour. It has been 
the custom at nearly all our villages after coming in to elect a new chief. On this 
occasion there was a very large gathering, all the villages far and near having 
been invited. There were between 600 a^id 700 present. Most of the Europeans 
in the district came to the ceremony. A very large (piantity of food — over twenty 
tons of yams, besides sugar cane and cocoanuts — was provided for the guests, and 
a great many hogs were slaughtered. It was principally their own aflfair, but they 
asked me to perform the ceremony. When it was over all the natives of the 
village brought their chief a present, some of them silver coins, others mats, 
baskets, pieces of print, articles of clothing, etc. The Mele natives are the 
cleanest and tidiest about their persons and premises we have. Last year was 
their fir.st to take up Sunday collections. They gave their teacher £7 10s., and au 
assistant £2, and to purchase seats for thei/new church they gave £14 10s. 

Towards the end of the year we lield a tea-meeting, with the double object of 
raising some money towards completing our church, and bringing our peo])le 
together to enjoy themselves. A social entertainment of this kind does goo<l in 
several ways. They become better acrpiainted with each other, and see that in 
giving up their old customs they have not given up social pleasures. They see, 
too, the benefits of the Gospel even in temporal atfairs, that they arc so much 
better off, for they all come in holiday attire. We realized over £7. At night w<^ 
had a display of fireworks on a small scale, which, needless to say, was greatly 
enjoyed. 

The usual Sunday services, weekly prayer meetings and classes, as well as 
daily school for adults, and again for children, were kept up with satisfactory 
results. During part of the year the older children from the nearer villages were 
taught English at the head station. Tl.e Sacrament of the Lord's Supi)er was 
dispensed twice. On the former occasion thirty-five were added to the Church, 






103 



the majority of whom I had baptized in infaiu'y. I previously intimated that I 
wlslied a contribution for tlie Training Institution on Hanto, and the collection 
that day amounted to £8 I7s. (id. sterling. 

Mrs. IMacKen/ie's sewing class, in which garments are made up for the 
English Company's store, was continued during the year witii very satisfactory 
results. Not only have the girls become ethcient in cutting out and making np 
tiarments of all kinds, but they were able to earn sometliing for themselves, as 
well as to make a contribution to the ]Mission. They receive half the proceeds. 
Ill .fuly .she opened another class, which in importance is eciual to anything yet 
uiiiTertaken, except preaching the (lospel. We have always urged uiK)n the 
natives the necessity of washing their clothes. Some of them did so after a 
fashit)n — often it was to take them to the sea and i)eat them between two stones — 
liut others wore them until they almost dropped off. At first she had some trouble 
witii them, but gradually they have taken to it, and now regularly on Tuesday 
almost every woman in the village may be seen marching to the church grounds 
with a bundle of .soiled clothes on her head. And here I may mention another 
great advantage of having an iron roof on our church. I told you in my last 
report th.at we have four large tanks for gatheiing rainwater for the arrowi'oot. 
Ill these tanks we have an abundant supply of water for the washing class as well, 
and without them the class would be impractical)le, as on this little island (Fila) 
there is no water. 

3Irs. MacKenzie has mad; another new dei)arture, but on ejitirely new 
jfiounds. She has been holding on Sunday a .service for the labour of the B'-itish 
settlers. The local manager of the English Company kindly gave her permission 
to hold it on their premises, and the boys themselves erected a 1 ooth in which to 
meet. These boys are from the northern islands, and are, for the most jiart, 
heathen. After being with the settlers for a time they all know a little F^nglish. 
We were told by one of the settlers, before she commenced the class, that as a 
regular thing these boys were lighting and drinking on Sundays. She has had as 
many as forty present. She has succeeded in getting the majority of them to 
take the pledge. 

In my last report I mentioned tliat we were unable to get a market for our 
arrowroot. The board will be gratilled to learn that 3Ir. H. Barnett, of Glasgow, 
to whose kindness we are already greatly indebted, has written to say that he will 
do what he can to dispose of it for us. and that we may send him from eight to ten 
casks annually. This is really good news. May the jNIaster Himself reward our 
dear friend. 

Number admitted to Ciiurch during year 42 

Number of children bapti:ced 11 

Money contributed £57 5s. 

Arrowroot 1 ,763 lbs. 



TANGOA SAXTO. 

On this i.sland Dr. Annand. the Principal of the New Hebrides Training In.sti- 
tution. assisted l)y 3Irs. Annand. Mr. Lane and Miss Symonds, continues to carry 
on Ills work in good health and si)irits. Some of the glimpses that be gives the 
Clmrcli of the progress of the (ros])el within the immediate range of his vision are 
Vv'iy like those furnished by Mr. McKenzie. In one of his letters to the late Dr. 
ilorrison he says : — 

In looking over our classes the other evening, and seeing the bright faces. I 
was reminded of the fact that many of them had been heathen, and that all their 
parents had lived in darkness. Twenty-six years ago, when we first came to the 
New Hebrides, there was not one Christian among the people now rei)resente(l by 
our students. Then, and for some time after, there was not a bai)tized person 
north of the south side of Efate. Five of our students are from Mr. ]Mackenzie's 
district, but they come from Efila. among whose par'iits we first worked for three 
years. The whole of our sixty -six student^ come from districts wholly heathen 
Iweiitv-five vears ago : and nianv of them from i)!aces not lialf that time under the 



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104 

influeuce of the Gospel. We are greatly encouraged when we think of what Ciod 
has done, and is still doing among our New Hebrideaus. VVe hope and believe 
that, before auotiier twenty-live years pass, there will be few if any of the people 
left in these islands remiiining in heathen darkness. However the battle is not yet 
finished. The enemy disinites every foot of ground. Lntely we had to exercise 
discipline on the men of two small villages nea" us. In order to stop the spread of 
the Gospel they asked the bushmen of certain pUv; s to kill either the missionaries 
or any of their boys Ll:at might visit them. Some of our friends told us of their 
malice, and we went and disarmed the plotters. We now hold their weapons as a 
J icdge of peace. 

in looking over our books I find that we have had in all no less than seventy- 
five students with us within the year. Nine new names were added to the roll, 
and thirteen were taken off. Of these hirteen, six graduated. Three were dis- 
missed, and three others left us from ill iiealth ; two of them on account of their 
own health, and the other becjiuse of his wife's illness ; and one die<l here. The 
average number with us for tne year was sixty-six. Our present number is sixty- 
two, with sixteen wives, and thirteen ciuldren. 

As anticipated we closed our year in a healthy condition. Financially we have 
a credit balance of £70. 'he larger number of mission boxes received reduced our 
cash expenditure ftn- cloth, t. However, we had to i)ay out over £IU for tluit item 
in addition to tl ' goods sen-: us. Seeing that our annual report will set forth all 
details as to leceipts and oxpenditures, I need not enlarge upon these matters here. 
The progress made by the pupils during the year has been encouraging, and at no 
time in the past has tiie Institution given such good promise of acconipl'shing the 
end for which it was established ?y at the present. 

The Bible is our chief text book, and it is carefully studied. Three lessons 
theroiii ;'re given each day. The whole book from Genesis to Kevelation is read 
over, and the truth brouglit as near as we can bring it to the minds and hearts of 
our pupils. Then to the senior classes a comprehensive view of the whole is given, 
as well {)s the relation of its several parts to each other. In addition to the Bible 
studies, we have arithmetic, geograjihy, grammar, dictation, writing from the 
Scriptures, and singing ; opportunities also of ])ublic reading, speaking and praying 
are afforded to all. Tl»e women also are tauglit daily in separate classes, as well 
as instructed in sewing, and household duties. 

In regard to the industrial labours I need not say much. All have been kept 
diligently employed during the horns set apart for those works. Our copra making 
has yielded a net .siira of nearly £50, while mai/e has brought in a few ]iound.; 
more. The ((uantity of taro, yam. bananas and maize cidtivatcd and eaten, has 
not been estimated, but ;t has helped greatly in keei)iiig down expenses. I am 
sorry that our coffee ))lantation. of some foiu- or five acres, is not doing well. The 
soil does not ap])ear suitable and many of oin- ]ilants are dying when we expected 
them to yield. ]Much labour has thus been thrown away ; how'ever. we will now 
plant the ground with breadfruit and cocoanut trees. 

The health of our large family is upon the whole fairly good. One of our more 
promising young men has had a severe attack of fever and dysentery, this week, 
which has left him somewhat insane. We trust that when the fever leaves him 
his mind may be restored. 

In my last letter T omitted to mention a very ])leasing fact. At synod meeting 
the Rev. J. W. ^Mackenzie handed me an order for £S 17s. Od., the proceeds of a com- 
munion collection, taken at Erakor. for tlie Training Institution. This is the third 
sum received within a year, given by the Christian natives of the group, making 
in all over £80 in cash, besides several presents of yams. Our own eomnumion 
collection, at synod time, amounted to £11 17s., but this was largely from mission- 
aries and Iheir families. 

On the ninth of this month, we had a second visit of H.]\I.S. Wallaroo. She 
called here to get information in regard to twelve nuMi and boys, said to have been 
kidnap))ed lately by a French labour vessel at Cape Lisburn bay. Through the 
kindness of Cajitain Far(|uhav we had a very pleasant social eve \ing on boad. 

We are much jileased with the activity of sonu' of our students in the work of 



105 



spreading the Go.spel amon.^j; tlie lieathen arouud U8. Le<l by our h'll'u iiuui, a vig- 
orous attae c is now direeted against the Tangoans. Nearly tlie whole Sabbath 
afternoons ire spent among them, in singing, speaking and praying. Those who 
try to escape the services are hunted up, sj)oken to. and prayed with, wherever 
found. Every placie is sacred ground to those who are earnestly seeking souls for 
Jesus. Recogui/ing the fact tluit, "without me ye can do nothing," that all real 
cluuige of heart must come from the Spirit's work, two sp^fial prayi-r-meetings are 
held every week by ,lie students and ^Ir. Bowie's assistants. Tiiese meetings are 
ill addition to the three weekly ones in connection with the Institution. On Sab- 
bath mornings, two or tliree companies of them in coMJunction with Mr. Bowie 
ami his helpers set oil' for work on Santo. These nuike long Journeys over the 
liills, conducting services wherever they can find people willing to hear them. As 
many as sixteen villages have been tluis overtaken in one day. In this way the 
country is l)eing opened so that teaeliers are now asked for in many place-?. What- 
ever the results of this work may be uj^yn their hearers, it certainly is a good trail- 
ing for the students themselves. Working for the salvation of others is the besi, 
tonic for the spiritual life. 



NKW lli:UKIl>i:s KXI'KNDlTfUK. 

lifr. J. Aiiniiiiil. D.IK. Sunlo: — 

Salary *1>7;^ :i4 

Training Institution 2i'^ 88 

Advance i' 00 

$I,L'18 07 

Ht'r. //. .1. Robert son. Erroinmujn : — 

Salary #'J7:^ 84 

Children's Allowance (2) !)7 88 

Repiyment of advance on acct. Martyrs' Memorial 

Church * 200 93 

Cost of Boat 21!) 00 

Advance 15 75 

11,506 35 

Rev. ./. W. McKenzie, Kj'itte :— 

Sahiry $978 84 

Children's Allowance (2) 97 88 

Advance 2 00 

$1,072 b'7 

Rates to Wid. and O. Fund $45 50 

Rates to Ag. Wid. and O. Fund If) 00 

Mrs. Geddie's Annuity 780 00 

Steamer Subsidy 1.216 titi 

Specials ' 1 15 00 

Salary Dr. Cosh. Ag. at Sydney 87 60 

Incidental Expenses, Dr. Cosh 48 ()7 

$2,259 43 

$6,057 12 
Less exchange on Sterling Bills 48 42 

$6,008 70 



'■i. 



10(3 



II.— TRINIDAD. 



GENERAL REVIEW FOR 1899. 



i 



The following changes have taken iilace during the year: 

In tiie mouth of June, Dr. Grant returned from Canada, quiet renewed in 
strength and vigor. Mrs. Grant, having undergone a successful operation while iu 
Canada, followed in October, entirely free from the facial pain from which she 
sutt'ered so much and so long. 

Mr. Eraser and family, accompanied by Miss Archibald, sailed J\ • Canada in 
June, and returned in December, mucli improved in health. 

Mrs. Macrae, who on account of ill-health, was obliged to seek a change of 
climate, sailed for Caiuida iu April, and returned with the Eraser's in December, 
much invigorated. 

Mr. Hnrold Clark, who labored with much acceptance for two yennias teacher 
in the Training School, retired iu July, and was succeeded iu August oy Mr. Frank 
Smith of Musquodoboit, N.S. 

Miss Sinclair, having completed her term of service, retire'^ froii^ the field in 
December. Miss Mary Laytou, of P.E.I. , has been appointed her successor, and 
is now on the ground. 

At the April examination of the Training School, seven pupil- out often were 
successful in obtaining certificates. 

Initiatory steps have been taken to secure recognition foi- a Sci.wl of F5econd- 
ary Education iu San Fernando, and finally aifiliation y\\> i the (^u^en's Royal 
College. 

To meet the growing demand" ; the Tunapuna field, the ".flev. Hai^ey Morton, 
with the approval of Foi-eign MI:--^n' Committee, has been aj, pointed assisstant 
to Dr. Morton, beginning with Novea 1/ci. 

The hearty thanks of the Mis'^ior.' Coiincii .vere tendered to the Colonial Co., 
limited, Sir Charles Tennant _''. Son, j!>'^-r -'.idbury, Barnly, Tm-nbull, Lamont, 
W. S. Robertson, and the many other friends of our Mission, for geuerous contri- 
butions and continued interest in our work. 



STATI.STICS. 




Canadian Missionaries 5 

Ordained Natives 4 

Catechists 53 

Bible Women 14 

Baptisms, adults 200 

" children 280 

'« total 480 

Ma. r'ages 79 

Canadian Lady Teachers 4 

.S( hools 59 

lii^ys on ..>11 3,450 

' .iris on i oil 1.353 

Total on roll — 4,803 

Avenge daily attondauce 2,743 

IVfs'i ,'nrolled during year 6,389 

i'-rununicants, Jan. 1st, 1899 687 



10* 



Added during year 94 

Died 7 

Keraoved 7 

Gone to India 8 

Suspended (5 

In good standing, Dec. 31st, 18!)9 753 

Net increase (Hi 

Sunday Schools • 80 

Numl)er on roll 8,308 

Daily average 1 ,905 

Contributions : — 

Proprietois *! ,450 00 

Native Church 4,G82 54 

Average i>er Communicant 22 



llev. Joiin Morton, D.l)., reports as follows : 

Beyond a visit to St. liUcia in April, in the in1<rests of our Mission, I have not 
been absent from my (iebl during the year, nor liave I missed a single Sabbath 
service from illness or weather. My assistants, Revs. I'aul Biuikhau and Andrew 
(tayadeeu, have also enjoye<l health and vigour for their work. 

The former, from St. Joseph as a centre, has exercised his rainistr'v over a 
wide tield. nortii of the Caroni River, and tiie latter over an ecjutil'N wide district 
south of that river. I have pleasure in testifying to their fidelity as Uieu and their 
acceptableness as preaciiers of the (Jospel. 

Eleven catechists have been employed, and three teachers rank as teacher- 
catechists, taking charge of a station in a whole or in part. Thcr-e catf clii-*s vary 
greatly inability and promise. Tiie teacher-catechists, and oue or tvvocitbt^s iiave 
the advantage of English, as oj)eniiig to them extensive aids to study and prepara- 
tion. These if they prove faithful, will no doubt come to th' m)\\i in IVi" !iiture. 
On the other hand some ou the catechists' list are old men whj i^o usiMVi work for 
the present, but will in time give i)lace to a better equi])ped class 

Two on our catechists' list only devote a part of t' ir time to mission work. 
Tiiey are prominent men in tli?ir districts and cannot e up their ordinary v .;rk 
except in part. It may be thought that these nu 
labor to the mission as unpaid workers. To siu'b 
objections. First, they cannot aflbrd to give up 
quires ; and secondly, we coidd net control and j)u 



lould give their time aud 
iriang<>raent there are two 
much time as tlie work t^- 
he work of a district were 



we dependent solely on voluntary aid. It seems betii r to coniribiite something and 
thus control and unify our work. At any rate tb' plan has worked well in some 
of our out-lying settlements. 

Schools. — Tiie Government began to assist A\ ooil brook school. Port of Spain, 
from January 1st, and Guaieo school from April 1st, 1899. A new school was 
opened at Sangre Chiquito. just i)eyond Sangre Grande, July 1st. so that i" have 
now sixteen schools under my management, fourteeii of them assisted by Govern- 
ment, with 1,944 children enrolled for the year on the (piarterly roll, and 835 in 
average daily attendance. 

The management of these schools calls for much travel, activity and anxious 
thought. There is scarcely a week in the year in w -h the mind is imt exercised 
over some one or more of tiiem. The Government pispector keeps his eye on the 
secular instruction and tests results in his annual exaruination. But the religious 
tr ining, general management and tone of the school depend greatly on our watch- 
fuiness. It is difficult ti> keej) all the teachers up to their opportuiuties, mind in 
some and method in othiM's l>eing at fault. 

The Secretary of State for the Colonies has ordered the introdiU!tion of agri- 
cultural education. His proi)osal is an excellent one, but the means suggested 



108 




seem iuadeciuate, and the result must be increased work and anxiety to school 
managers, at least for a time. 

lilblc Women. — Four Bil)le women were employed more or less continuously 
daring the year. This Ijrane!^ of our service is founded on the principle that the 
Churcli .mgiii to utilize all its availal>le force, and that there is a special capacity 
in Cliristian women for a special spliere of Christian work. This sphere is 
ciiiefly and formally among women and children. Occasionally, however, it tells 
directly as well as indirectly upon the men. Our women during the year have 
done excellent service. 

\\\ these difl'ercnt agencies the knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ, and of 
salvation througii Him, iuis been brought to old and young through church 
services, schools and visitation. Magic lantern scripture jiictures have also been 
used extensively and with excellent ell'ect, in school-houses, in the shelter of work- 
sheds, and even in the open air, to reach tiiose who cannot be drawn to .Sabbath 
services. 

Mrs. Morton, wlio has enjoyed excellent health during tiie year, continued, as 
in 1898, her Hible class for the advanced children of Tunajjuna school, her sewing 
class for tlie girls. l)y wliich she earned three dollars a month for our mission 
funds, and her Temperance work. In addition she re-opened lier "'Girls' Home" 
in January and kept it on till Chri • las. 

The late INFiss McCurdy. of Truro, made Mrs. Morton her residuary legatee. 
The sum arising from this she devoted to a work in which the donor was specially 
interested. Other sums were given by the L. B. M. Society of St. Andrew's 
Church, Truro, Nova Scotia, and by other friends. 

These sums, with the legac^y, amounted to $251.48. The total ex])enditure 
was $251.88. Tlius. without any effort of planing, the amount received covered 
the outlay. The iiigiie.st number in tlie ' 'tome" was twelve, and tiie average 
between nine an<l ten. Five came from Pilncetown, three from Couva, and four 
from Tunajtuna. Tiie gr^'ater number of the girl.^ will likely, ere long, be usefully 
settled. Tliey iiuve been traiiu'd with a f "lecial view to work among their coun- 
try-women. Forty-live girls have thus been trained in the Tunapui.a "Girls' 
Home" since it was oi)enod in 1890. It now closes for a tii;;e. If funds provi- 
dentially come to it, they will be used in a similar way. 

In every thresliiug-fioor there is some chatt', which in the winnowing may get 
into our eyes. In ouiy this year some dismissed agents joined tiie heathen and 
rum interest in Tunapuna in a l)old attack upon our work. Their conduct in lliis 
matter amply justified us in having previously dismissed them. The attack lias 
failed, discipline has been maintained and strengthened, and the result has been a 
new experience to us and a distinc; gain to our mission. 

In the cause of truth, purity and temperance we must expect to suffer. Alex- 
ander the copper-smith lives in his descendants, w'ho shout as of old, "Great is 
Diana ! " "By this craft we have our wealth." 

One hundred and seventy-six joine<l our Blue Ribbon T>and this year, the total 
number enrolled being 82(i. It is not professed that every one of these 'as uni- 
formly kept bis first pledge, but the number who have done so is very remarkable 
and very encouvagiiig. 

In this district the last half-year has been a time of trial to the people. Our 
princi])al sugar e.-jtates have been practically in liquidation, witli tlieir future 
ownership uncertain. They liave not therefore employed the usual labour. The 
rainfall lias also been deficient, so that the people's gardens have suffered. 
'.'''lus has effected our contributions for tlie year, and it has driven some of our 
people out to tlie woods. It iias been trying to them and to us ; but we hope the 
present distress will soon pass away. 

Miss Blackadder's report is herewith forwarded and the general rejiort will 
refer to her past services and coming furlough. 

"I'lie following buildings were erected during the year : A school and teacher's 
house at Sangre Chiquito, a teacher's house at Arouca. and a catechists Jiouse at 
Chaguanas. The statistics for the year show 170 baptisms, 77 of them adults ; 
23 marriages, and 150 communicants in good standing. 



I hi 
symiiatl 



these te 

Tin 

greet th 



109 

I have again to cxiiros.s my iiKltptt'diU'ss to the ^Messrs. C'adbury for kintlly 
syrapathy and geuei-ous aid to our \vi>rk. 



Rev. H. J. Grant writes to tlie Committee, under date of .laniiary ist, l!>()0, iu 
the-ie terms ; 

Tliruugh the good hand of'oui'<iod niton us, we are permitted as a family to 
greet this N-'W Year in more tiian ordinary iiealtii and vigour. 

As I v^rite the street is tlironged witii people in their gaye,-ft apjtarel hastening 
to the Annual Regatta. In eontrast with this, but a little hiter in the si'a.son. last 
year the noble S.fS. liruee was unable to loret- her way into Sydney JIarbor. (', B., 
and after a delay ofiliirty-six hours we entered Louisl>urg. E.xtremes of tempera- 
ture have many eonii>ensations, however. 

Early in June I resumed work here, iiaving spent the first live months of the 
year eliietly in Nova 8c<jlia, but not in idleness. 

Every pait of the work here was, in my absenee, well sustained, 'i'o the Rev. 
Mr. Wilson, of the Seoteh Church, and our own missionaries of other fu-lds, we 
are mueli indebted for seasonable aid, cheerfully rendered not oidy in my absence 
but during Mr. Eraser's furlough also. 

The Rev. Jial Behari, as the leader of the native contingent in active service, 
did his iiart wiih his u.sual ability, enthu.^iasm and lidelity, and some of his onieer.s 
and men deserve special notice. " Diamond " district was attended to by the Rev. 
D. Ujagar who did his work well, Arthur Girdhari, as an all-round man. is 
almost indispensable. Thomas Biseser, an el^' ■: v u\ a cocoa plantt'r. has arranged 
to have his cultivation attended to by anothe.', and has given himself wholly to 
tiie work of the mission. Another elder, Charles I'ryag, takes regular >ervice 
every Habbath, and supervises schools within his reach, besides attending to the 
ordinary work of the eldership. 

Statistics I leave wholly to ilr. Eraser, but in the agencies at work to jtroduce 
lhe.se statistical results tlieve is much to commend ; much to awaken gratitude and 
hope. Our people are willing, liberal and thoi'oughly loyal to the parent cliureh 
in Canada, and are planing witli their missionaries to do more (inaiicially. 

On the sciiool work which is a power for go >d and which ei<sts our church 
very little now, I shall not veniure to enlarge. 

The Training School of which 1 am manager, was in charge of 3Ir. JIarold 
Clark the iirst seven r-.^ntiis v ♦" the year, and of Mr. Frank Smith the last five 
months. Si.>: recidout and two non resider t students are in atten<lance. In April. 
at the annual examination, seven obuiiaed certiiicates, and thus Itecame eligible 
for engagement as teachers. This school sends out young men fairly well furn- 
ished, and its influence is distinctly visible in the tone and growing efficiency of 
our schools. The Rev. Mr. Dustan noted this in the comparison of three teachers 
whose schools he had visited. 

in connection with the Training School, about thirty general students were 
enrolled, giving an average of twenty-four. Fees paid by them go to the head 
teacher, now Mr. Smith, who lills the position well, and from them he pays his 
assistant, a certificated teacher. These general students form the school of second- 
ary education, and for its recognition and afliliation with Queen's Royal College, 
the Council have petitioned the Go\ernment. I 

In pr.iof of sustained interest in our work by estate proprietors let me state a 
case. An old Scotch friend who knew from personal observation the character 
of our work, and who h 1 foi' many years contributed largely to its support, was 
constrained regretfully, through heavy losses for four or five years in succession, 
to withdraw his grant. Unsolicited, a few weeks ago, he wrote me as follows : 
"Ian. glad to hear that your .schools are flouri.shing. I often wonder how the 
people in Nova Scotia are so good to us in Trinidad. We have been doing rather 
better for the last two years . . . and I feel bou\ul to assist you again a little. 
• . . I have pleasure to enclose you an order on my agents for .*100, and hope 
to be able to continue the .same in future year--." 



110 

The iiulicationH of i)rogros9 were never more marked, as witnessed in atten- 
dan(!e on the means of grace, whether at the ordinary services or the Sunday 
schools, the prayer meeting, Cliristian Kn<leavonr, etc. We know tiiat (lod lias 
been with us, and we take up the work of this New Year in the strong conlidence 
that He who hath helped will help. 



Rev. T. A. Fraser, Dr. Grant's colleague in San Fernaiulo, reports thus : 

From the beginning of the year to June 1st I had charge of the English- 
speaking congregation in the town of San Fernando, in addition to my usual work 
in the country districts. 

It was suggested by tlie ^fission Council that I take my furlough immediately 
after Dr. (Jrant's return in June, and gladly concurred in their suggestion, and 
although I am physicially strong, yet, when I embarked for Canada I had' a firm 
conviction that my furlough had come none too soon. After a change of five 
months — not of (H)mi)lete rest — 1 and my family arrived in Trinidad on December 
18th, greatly refreshed and invigorated. 

While at home I visited a large n\nnber of congregations, and everywhere 
received a hearty welcome. The majority showed an interest and enthusiasm in 
the great Foreign Mission work of the Church, which was very encouraging, but I 
am sorry to say there are some congregations anil individuals who, forgetting the 
great command, give little or nothing for the support of Foreign jNFissions. 

Would it not be po.ssible for a committee of Presbytery or some enthusiastic 
brother to visit such congregations and arouse a living interest, as is done when a 
congregation fails to do its duty in giving to some of the other Schemes of the 
Church. 

My work for the half year in Trinidad was carried on exactly on the lines of 
previous years. There were in operation during the year seventeen week-day 
schools, with a total enrollment for the year of 1,802, and an average attendance 
of 835. Heligious iuatruction is given regularly in all schools. There were 
twenty-th i e Sunday Schools, with an enrollment of 1,028, and an average 
attendance of 74;i Also eighteen night schools in which Hindi is taught from 
Christian books. 

The missionaries, assisted by two native ministers, nine regular catechists, 
four half-time men and three Bible women, conduct services in twenty-seven 
different places every Sabbath, and during the week they go from jungle to jungle, 
estate to estate, barrack to barrack, house to house, market to market, and stand 
on the street (corners, preaching the (Jospel of Christ, selling and distributing Bibles 
and Christian books and tracts. 

Our regular .staff of catciihists has been weakened by sending to Jamaica at 
dilferent times four of our good men, but we hope that others will soon be coming 
forward to take their places. 

Two of our young men graduated from the Training School in the spring, and 
are now doing good work as head teachers. 

Govei-nmeut aid has been granted to Separia school. We were disappointed 
in not receiving aid for Esperauce school as the Board of Education led us to 
expect. Two new commodious school. houses which serve as places of worship on 
the Sabbath, have been erected in the southern district, one at Fyzbad, the other 
at Pusilac. 

For further details of the year's work see Dr. Grant's report. The result of 
the year's work so far as tigurescan show is as follows : loO baptisms, twenty-seven 
marriages, forty added to communion roll. Other statistics will be found in 
statistical report. 



Rev. W. L. Macrae says thi <■ ar** .sixteen districts in this Held in which services 
are regularly held on Sundays, iis well as several others in which work is done less 
Each district has '' wu group of Christian people, .some weak and 



regularly 



Ill 



Strug};! iiig, but otluTs strong and liopeiul. So iiiuch dcpi-uds ou the cluinu'ti'r and 
iiilliience of tlu- individual cati'fhist of the district that we feel one of the chief 
needs of our mission is that of earnest, faithful, well-trained men of this class. By 
means of the College aud individual training in our tields, we hope to see this need 
gradually su}>|)lied. 

Notwithstanding present shortc«)mings, however, all our districts are gradually 
developing and consolidating. We mourn the lack, of spirituiil life throughout our 
field, yet we have met and dealt with more genuine anxious encpiirers during the 
past year than perhaps during any previous year, There is gradually a moving 
among the dry l)ones, although we have not yet seen the quickening from on high 
in the measure longed for. 

The contributions of our native <hurch are 8107 al)ove that ol' last year. Mr. 
James Toolsee, one of our elders, gave a thaukoU'ering of forty'dollars in addition 
to his regidar contribution, which is also liberal. 

In the mouth of May assistance was granted to tlie Elswick school. This 
makes the number of our assisted schools twelve, and unassisted three. The 
aggregate daily attendance is 014. This exceeds that of last year ity lifty-one. 

Much credit is due Mr. Soodeeu for eaiiiest, aithi'id, steady tt>il connected 
with these schools, as well as other pha.ses of missionary work. 

.Miss Sinclair, having completed her term of service, retired from the field in 
Deceml)er. She has left behind her an excellent record, both as a teacher aud 
Christian worker. She returned home considerably reduced in strength and vigour, 
but amidst the regrets of the many whose welfare she .sought. The work she laid 
down will be taken up by Miss Layton, who is now ou the ground. Thus the 
workers change but the work goes on. 

The usual stress has been laid on Sunday School aud Christian p]ndeavour work. 
Here we feel the need of earnest teachers and workers. These excellent 
organizations, like the old-fashioned millstones, will give no returns unless .some 
energetic hand steadily applies the motive power. One of the mo.st important and 
perhaps the most dillicult pha.ses of missionary work is '• teaching to teach," and 
leading those who know the truth into earnest, steady, active .service. 

The returns of our Sunday Schools aud Christian P'udeavor Societies are 
encouraging, but we feel that they are not what they might be, nor what they will 
be when all oiu- workers have learned more thoroughly the art of winning souls. 
The average attendance of our twenty-two Sabbath Schools is 477. 

The Boys' Brigade has been su.stained with interest throughout the year. 
Although the majority of our boys are very small, yet our company has taken 
second rank in the Scriptural examination of the Trinidad Batallion. 

By appointment of Missiou Council, I vi.sited St. Lucia in the early part of 
December, aud endeavoured to advance the work in that Island. Many tolteus of 
Divine favour aud blessing have nuirked the year now closing, while not a few 
evidences of the necessity for humiliatiou aud earnest prayer have been manifest. 



f" 



Rev. A. W. Thompson writes : 

As stated in last year's Keport, the heralquarters of mission work in the Couva 
District were removed from Exchange Village to higher ground, at Balmain. The 
work of removal began in December, and was c()mi)leted in February, and on 
March 1st we took up our residence in our new (|uarters. 

It will take some time to get all the work adjusted to suit the change, but 
things are quietly shajiing themselves. The opening up of a road to the north, 
through a fine Cacao settlement taps the whole of rl e upland country, and brings 
it inucli nearer to the new centre than it ever was to the old. 

The change has settled one or two problems that have been before us for some 
time. 

The church in Exchange Village has for a considerable time caused us much 
thought. Its situation was bad — very bad, just on the edge of the village canal, 



I 

,f; ■ 



112 



untl il was often very fur from \w\\\\f I)U>u^4Ullt, to say tlic Inist, to sit on the canal 
.sid(! of till' oluirch (luring ovi'iiin^ siTvicc. 

The removal of the manse left tiie centre of tiie lot fiee, an<l to tiiis centre was 
the church removed at the close of the year. The expenditure thus entailed wa> 
met l»y special suhscriplion from the English congregation and our I"'ast Indian 
friends. 

Church extension was another long-pressing prohlcm. < )ur church Ih far too 
small. Once il was moved to a Itetter position the (piestion of its enlargement came 
up before us. After due consideiation and advice, it was decided to build a new 
church at IJalmain. and gather to it all the ui)laud country jicople, h xving the 
church at Kxchaiige Village to serve the wants of all those who live in the sugar 
eatated, and the villages adjacent to them. This will amply meet the case, and 
will greatly promote the etlicieiit working of this held. An earnest ellbrt is being 
matle to raise the funds fortius work among our own pi'ople inul their friends. 

The workers, with one or two exce[itions, gave good satisfaction during the 
very trying year just closed. Four catcchists were em]tloyed ; ele\ en schools were 
in operation; twenty Sunday schools wcri' conducted, and twenty-live regidar 
Sunday services were held. Miss Fisher laboured with her wonted zeal and spirit 
until August, when, at the re<|Ui'st of the .Mission ("ouncil. she went to the aid of 
the Tiniapiuia District, whcreshe still lal)oin's With much acceptance. Henry liirbal. 
who got his first lesson from Miss Fisher, and worked his way up in her school 
until he entered the Training College— where, after two years' study he won a 
second class certificate — succeeds her and has done good work. He was the second 
one of the mission teachers to win a second class. Charles Lalla, now in the Train- 
ing Si'hool. is another of Miss Fisher's promising boys. Besides these, most of our 
Indian teachers and ])Upil teachers have had their training, in whole or in gl•^ater 
))art, in her school. She left us with an excellent record. Every day makes us 
more conscious of our loss. 

No department of our work calls for special notice. 

Our thani s are due to the brethren for timely help in our special work ; to 
Jas. Arbuckle. Esq., who has placed the manse family, as well as the mission, 
under many obligations ; and to all friends, who in any way aided in our work. 

Our trials have been many, but our mercies have abounded. The Lord hath 
been mindful of us ; He will bless us. 

The following table gives our statistics for the year in the Couva District : — 

Canadian Missionary 1 

Ordained natives 

Catcchists 10 

Bible women 4 

Baptisms, adults 80 

" children 45 

" total 75 

]Vrarriages 17 

Canadian lady teachers 1 

Schools 11 

Bovs on roll 5(i5 

( Hrls on roll 241 

Total on roll 806 

Average daily attendance 459 

Total enrolled during whole year 1,018 

Communicants, Dec. 81st, 1898 95 

Added during the year 7 

Died 

Kemoved 

Gone to India 2 

Suspended 

Total in good standing, Dec. 31st, 1899 100 

Net increase 5 



it! .1^- 



IIM 



SuiKlay Hch(»()lM 20 

Scliidiirs on roll iH4 

Daily ii\ rrajie 4H'2 

('oiilrihiitiuiirt : — 

Proprietors UfAitS 0(» 

Native Chiirch 1,044 ()(» 

Average perComimniieaiit loll 



These rejiorts of our missionaries make it elear lliat they have, as usual, carried 
on tlieir work with great diligenee and lidelity, and that their etlbrts have heuu 
crowned with very eneouraging sueeess. They have had most loyal eo-operatiou 
from the Can.uil.in teaehers as well as from the native pastors, eateehists, Bible 
women, and other helpers. Lai Behari still eoutinues to he a tower of strength in 
the Siui Fernando field. 1*. Soodeeu performs a similar service in Primcestowu, 
while P. Bukhem and A. Gayodeen greatly strengthen the hands of Dr. Morton. 
The Canadian teachers not oidy do their work well in the <lay schools, hut they 
are increasing in their ellbrts to conduct Sal)l)ath schools, sometimes teaching in 
two or three on eacdi Sahhath. It i.s almost impossible to over-estinuite the value 
of the tvork done in tlie (ifty-nine day schools, which are conducted under the 
ausj>ices of the mission. Xot only are the rudiments of secular education given, 
but much time ami pains are taken to teach the truths of the Oospel and to bring 
the pupils under their power. 



I 



PRESHVTEKI.\N TRAINING COLLEOE REPORT FOR 181>!». 

Ten students were in attendance during the year. They were of two drafts 
1)Ut the stuilies were arranged to deal with them as a single cla.ss. 

Dr. Cfrant was al»seut in Canada during tlie first term, and Kev. Wm. L. 
Macrae a.ssisted us by taking up the New Testament subject. As Mr. Fraser left 
on Dr. Grant's return, and .Mr. Macrae's subject was only in course, he continued 
his class work throughout the three terms. We are much indebted to him for the 
assistance thus rendered in our college work. Kev. Lalbiharising took his classes 
regularly during the year. Each teacher took the same subjects as in previous 
years. 

During the midsummer holidays all our native ministers and catP''*'''«ts were 
brought into res .deuce at the college for five days, for addresses or <■• ' subjects, 

conference and prayer. The subjects taken up were " The Word,i?ac^.aments, and 
prayer, and the work of *he Holy Spirit." From the first the interest was 
marked, and it continued to deepen till the close. The eflect on our workers, and 
through them on our mission must be advantageous and it is proposed to hokl 
similar gatherings in future years. 

The accounts for 1809 will be forwarded by Dr. Grant. 

For 1900, we ask as in past years the sum of £125. 



The Foreign Mission Committee would call the attention of the General 
Assembly to the fact that the Canadian mission staff in Trinidad has been 
strengthened by the appointment of an as-sistant to Dr. Morton. At their meeting 
held in October last, a petition from the Mission Council was submitted, a.sking for 
a sixth missionary for Trinidad. This petition was supported by a strong repre- 
sentation from the Presbytery of Trinidad, whose commissioner was present at the 
meeting, and gave reasons why the petition should be granted. After careful 
consideration the Committee resolved "that in view of the pressure on our funds, 
the Convener be directed to correspond with the Mission Council and arrange if 
possible for an assistant in Dr. Morton's field, in the meantime with a view to an 
ultimate appointment when the way is open." This was done, and at the request 



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of the >[issiou Counr;.i, Mr. Harvey Morton was appointed for a year, on the 
understanding that the extra expense be met if possible in Trinidad, without 
calling for any increase in the Trinidad estimates. This arrangement will keep all 
the fields occupied and straight even during the time that Dr. Morton is home on 
furlough. 



marriages 
schools, 1 









DEMERARA. 

At the same meeting of Committee, a communication was read from Rev. 
J. B. Cropper, intimating that the Government of British Guiana had made 
proposals to him with the view of obtaining his services as Superintendent of East 
Indian Settlements in that Colony. It appears that the Government are anxious 
to retain the Eivst Indians in Demerara as permanent settlers instead of havinfj 
them return to India on the expiration of their inderture, as they have a right to 
do according to the terms of their contract, and that they are of opinion that if 
they can secure the services of some able and tactful superintendent to visit their 
settlements, to look after the interests of the settlers, to promote the sanitary 
condition of their settlements, to seek to encourage and stimulate them in planting 
fruit trees, vegetables, etc., as well as rice, to arrange for the establishment of 
village councils for the administration of the aflairs of the settlements, and to try 
to settle as far as po.ssible all disputes and (juarrels that may arise, they would do 
much to promote the welfare of the East Indians themselves as to advance the 
interests of the Colony. The Governor of the Colony having made the acquaintance 
of Mr. Cropper, who had acted as his private in St. Lucia, was of opinitm that l.e 
was well (lualified for the work. Accordingly he proposed to him that ne should 
undertake the work, which Mr. Cropper after consulting with the Mission Council 
in Trinidad and your Committee, and obtaining their concurrence agreed to do, ail 
the more readily as he thought that he would still be able to do much real mission 
work as well as help to facilitate the operations of the missionaries, and also set 
free the funds to the account of the salary which he had been receiving for the 
support of an additional missionary. This arrangement took effect on December 
11th, and is now in operation. 

In April, your Committee were informed by Rev. G. E. Ross, of Bethany 
Church, Halifax, that he was ready to go as a missionary to Demerara, should the 
Committee think it for the best interest of the church and mission to send him. 
The Committee were well aware of his fitness for the work, agreed at once to ask him 
to accept an appointment and to leave for that field in the early autumn. At tlie 
meeting of the Synod held Truro in October, he was designated, and sailed next 
day for Demerara which he reached in safety and where he has since been at work 
in the field formerly occupied by Mr. Cropper. 

At the end of the year Mr. Ross reported as follows : — 

I beg leave to report that I arrived in Demerara on October 26th last, and at 
once took charge of our work at Better Hope. Mr. Cropper who has been labouring 
here for the past three years, remained with me for a time, initiating me into 
methods of work and surveying the large field committed to our care. Duriufi 
the remaining two months of the year in addition to carrying on the regular 
mission work, special attention has been given to acquiring the language. Con- 
siderable progress has been made in this particular, but one finds with all the 
pressure of work, that he cannot devote such time to the language, sw is really 
necessary. 

Our work in Demerara is yet in its infancy ; but a magnificent field for 
missionary enterprise is afforded us. The prospect is most encouraging. We 
earnestly hope and pray that in the near future more laborers will be sent forth to 
Strengthen our hands, and that Demerara with her 120,000 East Indians may 
speedily be reclaimed for the Master. 

The following are statistics for Better Hope Mission Field for 1899 : — Fast 
Indian : — iCanadian missionary, 1 ; catechists, 3 ; Bible women, 1 ; baptisms, 14 



marriages, 
schools, 3 



4 ; schools, 2 
; contributions 



scholars on 
for the year, 



roll, 153 ; communicants, 20 ; Sabbath 
$33.85. West Indian : — Baptisms, 3 ; 



115 

marriages, 3 ; schools, 1 ; scholars ou roll, 5l> ; cominunicauts, 79 ; Sabbath 
schools, 1 ; contributions for the year, $94.40. 



TRINIDAD EXI'EXDITrRE. 



S^^;^^ 






Amount paid ou account of Tr'uidad and Denierara, from April 
1st, 1899, to April 1st, 1900, $19,923.21. 



HI— KOREA. 




Ill this field the work has gone on well during the year. In the judgmeut of 
tiie missionaries tlie prospects are so good that they are not only about to occupy 
a scoontl centre at Ham Hung, but they urgently appeal to your Committee for an 
iui'iease of our start". The state of the funds prevented the Committee from com- 
plying with their request, but they decided to lay the facts presented before the 
riiuich, and as this new field is not so well known as the others, it has been 
ihouglit i)est to give thu As.-!enil)ly tlie reports of the mitjsionaries almost in full. 

Mr. Foote writes as follows : 

Last year when the iei)ort of our work since coming to Korea was written, 
Woiisau was one of the mission stations of the Presbyterian Church of the United 
States, north, with Rev. .J. S. Gale in charge. It was not until September 9th of 
this year that he removed to Seoul. Before that time although we devoted the best 
of our energies to the study of the language, we rendered him any assistance we 
were able. Since that time, with the help of the native Christians, we have cared 
a^ l)est we could for the interests of the work committed to our charge. 

ftinerating. — This field is very extensive, being about 200 miles long and forty 
miles wide, including thirty-nine magisterial towns and almost innumerable 
villages. A large part of my time should be given to country work, but during 
the past year, owing to my limited knowledge of the language, I found itinerating 
on a large scale impracticable. 

Early in the spring I visited Ham Hung, a large city 100 miles distant, to look 
after the work of the Church in that station. I reached there March 4th, and 
found a little band of Christians meeting every night for study and worship, five of 
whom I baptized. On April 8th I made the first of several trips to Anpyon where 
we organized an out-station. Altogether I have spent about six weeks itinerating. 

Daif Schooln. — Over two years ago the native church here purchased a field, 
the proceeds of which are devoted to the support of a school for the boys of 
Christian parents. The teacher derives nearly three-fourths of his salary from this 
source, and tha remainder is paid by the parents of the boys attending. The 
number of boys enrolled is fifteen. The Bible is studied every day. The other 
subjects taught are reading, writing, arithmetic, catechism, singing, Chinese and 
English. 

Early in January Mrs. Foote opened a school for girls, two afternoons of each 
week. Seventeen are enrolled, and for want of a better place they meet at our 
house. It is U(»t the custom of this land for girls to attend school, consequently 
l)ut few can read. This is a great drawback in our work. The subjects taught are 
reading, writing, arithmetic, catechism. New Testament, Chinese, English, singing 
and knitting. 

Sunday School. — In this department of our work great interest is manifested. 
The Koreans are bright, intelligent, and persistent students. This makes teaching 
easy. In April, at Mr. Gale's request, Mrs. Foote and I opened two Sunday 






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School cliirtso.s for the younj? people of our congregation. We could not speuk 
many words of the language, and the task was diHi<ndt. Twenty -seven boys and 
girls came the first morning, and since then several have been added to their 
number. The interest has spread beyond these classes and several adults of the 
congregation arc following the same course. We prepare our own -maps and 
helps. 

Kvery member, catechumen and adherent attends Sunday School. At present 
Bible study occupies a prominent place in our congregational work. The men, 
who meet- every Sunday morning before preaching service, are taught by two of 
the best and most experienced members. The women meet in the atlernoon auvi 
are taught by Mrs. Foote. 

We also have two special clas.ses for catechumens, one for the men and one for 
the women. Tliese classes are very interesting. Mrs. Foote teaches the latter and 
I teach the former. Catechumens are received as such after examination. No one 
is admitted into the catechumenate unless the Session is satisfied that the ap])licanl 
is a Christian. After a person has been a cateiihumen for si.i months and has taken 
a course of instruction he is allowed to apply for baptism. We find the members 
of these classes very diligent students, and are pleased with the pi'ogress they are 
making. 

Trnininj) C/a^xcH. — Although Mr. Gale alone delivered the lectures to the 
Christians wiio gatluu'ed here last February for three weeks' study, we may claim 
to have had some small share in the work. The leading men in this mission living 
outside of Won.«an were invited to join the Christians liere for a short course of 
Bible study. We were suprised at tiie large number who came. One man walked 
over 180 miles to be present. Several came 130 miles, others came 100 miles. 
Sixty in all were enrolled. The Woiisan Christians prox i<led entertainment for 
their visiting bretliern. Cla.s.ses were held in the morning and evening of each day. 
In the afternoon the ('hristians visited ditlerent parts of the city and held service 
or spoke to tlieir friends of the claims of (!hrist. After the evening lecture, time 
was given lor i)rayer and testimony. This is the beginning of our future college 
and native ministry. 

I>uring the lastof .March and first of April, Mrs. Swallen hehl a similar da.ss for 
women. Four came from Ham Hung 100 miles distant. As but few Korean 
women can read and as they do not have equal opportunities with the men for 
study, the teaching of necessity was elementry. However, a good beginning was 
made which already lias proved a blessing to the Church. 

ICrenhif) i^tiulif. — ^To thos*^ who in earlier years were wedded to idolatry, and 
whose religious acts were to worship at the graves of tlieir ancestors, but are now 
Christians, the liible is a wonderful book. Even the oldest Ciiristians here Inst 
heard tiie (idsjiel but a few years ago, and the way they study the word of God is 
certainly remarkable. 

In connection with this congregation during the long winter evenings there are 
three places where the Christians meet c\ery night for Bible study. They sit on 
the fioor in a circle around the lamp and often far on into the nigiit without re- 
ference, Bible or commentary, but with reverent minds and prayerful hearts try to 
understand arigiit the message of Cod. 

Praift'r-mccliiufH, — A prayer-meeting is conducted in every section of the con- 
gregation. The marked dillerence between the number who attend preaching 
service and prayer-meeting in the home-land is entirely wanting with us. Every 
person who attends preaching .service makes it a jtoint to be at i>rayer-meeting. 

Preachitifj Services. — I cannot speak too highly of the assistance rendered by the 
natives in these services, or of the average attendance. It has been some months 
since Mr. (Jale, who by his pleasing manner and beautiful Korean language ma<le 
Sunday services especially attractive, went to Seoul yet the interest has not sufTercd 
and the attendance has increased. 

Hitherto we have been labouring under the disadvantage of having to divide 
the congregation into two sections and have these meet in diflferent parts of the 
city, or at difierent times because of the limited size of our largest meeting place. 



117 

At present the congregation is divided into three sections, A native preacher 
nl each phice. 

All this is uhout to ho cliunged, astlie new church is nearing completion. Mrs. 
(Jule has rendered valuahle assistance at the service for women. The Sacrament 
of the Lord's sujyper and haptism are administered twice during t lie year. The 
riiurch members number llfty -seven, the catechumens thirty-nine and the baptized 
cliildren six. ('onlributions and income from land, and interest for the year 
amount to 4,250 yaiig, or $425 gold (1 yang is a days wage in Korea). 

Church building. — The principal interest of the congregation at present centres 
in the new church. As soon as Mr. Gale knew he was going to Seoul he called a 
mectingof the congregation and it was decided to supply a long felt want and build 
a church. After some <liHiculty a site was secured in the centre of the city. 

In tlie sultry heat and beating rain of summer several of the Christians went 
to the mountains thirty miles distant and cut the timber, which while the streams 
wt're high was floated down to the sea shore, from whence it was brought by boat 
to Wonsan. With liberality the little flock gave of their means and with skill and 
enthusiasm labored with their hands to accomplish the purpose so dear to their 
hearts. 

It must Idc a joy to them to know that they have .succeeded beyond their fondest 
hopes. The church, witli its wooden floor, sub.stantial walls, and iron roof is well 
built in every jjarticular and is free from debt. Besides the large well-lighted 
aiulitorium which has a seating capacity for over 500 persons, there are two school 
rooms one lor boys and one for girls, and two other rooms where Mrs, Foote and 
I can study and meet the Koreans. 

Out StafionK, — Anpyon, an iiiduential magisterial town thirteen miles distant, 
is the only out-station connected with Wonsan where Sunday and mid-week services 
are regularly condu(;ted, although occasional services arc held in other places. 
Nearly a year ago one of the Christians of Wonsan, thinking regular jr,reaching 
service sliouhl be held in Anpyon determined to sell his property here and move to 
tliat town. This he did and so arranged two rooms of his hou.se that they make a 
(■omfortal)le meeting place. 

For some time a man was sent from AVonsan every Aveek to aid in the Sunday 
service. But the cause basso well developed that a local leader has been appointed 
and outside assistance is no longer needed. 

In conclusion we desire to place on record our thanks to our heavenly Father 
for the great blessing of good health, the progress of the year, the encouraging out- 
look, the letters of kind friends and the supjjort and jirayers of the Church. 



Dr. (Jrierson reports thus : 

January and part of Febnuiry were si)ent in Seoul in study. Leaving there on 
February Gth we reached Wonsan I'ebruary l.'Uh. 

Arriving here we had scarcely time to get into the house we had rented when 
we were besieged by sick people who had heard of the ari-ival of a foreign doctor. 

Before reaching Wonsan it had been our resolve to refuse all medical calls, for 
the purpose of devoting qiirselves entirely to language study, considering that 
work, under the circumstances in which we take over this field, to be our first and 
most important labor. Notwithstanding our desire for study, however, so piteous 
and persistent were the calls for help that it did not seem humane to refuse, and 
very reluctantly stutly was almost entirely laid aside and medical and surgical 
work undertaken. 

At first the practice was conducted in the large parlor of our house, using the 
veranda as a waiting-room, and treating only the most severe cases out of the 
scores who swarmed about the house daily for medicine. One day over ninety 
])orsons were waiting at one time to see the doctor. 

It was the aim of our practice at this .stage to undertake only ruch cases as 
could be treated with some good hope of success, refusing to see trifling ailments 



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and utterly hopolcss avsos. It was necessary evj-ry <lay to iniiMter the wiutle liand 
of applicants and (|U('sti<*n each as to liis or her ailliction, giving a ti(;ket of adinis- 
Hion tt) those who were to \h' sern and persnadinj; the others to h-ave the premises. 

After having such tlirongs of people al>ont our house from morning till night 
for ahout a month, wv ohtaiiied the use of a huilding near by, and continued 
practice there. 

Atler a month's further practice my eighty <lollars worth of nietlicines hrougiit 
from (y^anada began to run short in important linch, and though supplementetl a 
little from Japanese sources, was too meagre to warrant satisfactory work. Con- 
sidering al.so that I had l)een entirely neglecting pro|)er language study for medical 
work, I resolved to limit my practice until I had nctjuircd more of tlie language 
so after the middle of April I did not undertake new cases, and only tini.shed up 
old cases already on my hands. 

Owing t<» the dilliculty of linding out ahout the ca.ses with «»ur imperfect 
knowledge of Korean, and without an interpreter, the actual numhcr of pati*>nts 
seen an«l treated in the two montlis was not very large, hut most of then> .several 
times, and many of them through a long course of treatnu>nt. I luul ten opera- 
tions under chloroform and twt) under cocaine, one of which was for cataract. 

I must acknowledge with thanks invaluable as.sistance rcnd«'red in the major 
operations, as almost daily in the minor dressings, by Mr. ^lacrae, who very 
quickly learned to be a satisfactory ana«'sthetist. 

From the time of discontinuing public practice until the present time 1 have 
done miu'h work in bringing to an en<l surgical treatment begun earlier, and also 
iu treating new ca.ses among the members of the Church in Wonsan. 

The work of prea«'hing to the assend»Ied jtatients fell mainly upon my lan- 
guage teacher, who with great zeal improved every opi>ortunity, C()nversing. 
preaching, singing, praying, and reading good books allowed in the waiting room. 
He also sold a large number of books and tracts to the patients. I will n(»t in tlii.- 
connection give instances of spiritual results, which, by the blessiug of (Jod, were 
uot u few. Several who had. never heard of Christ bel'ore coming to the doctor 
have since shown interest in the (Jospel. 

From May to Septend)er my time was mainly occupied in language .study, ami 
at the end of that period I went up to Seoul and took the language examination 
on the first year's cour.se of study as laid down by the Examination Committee of 
the Mission of the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. Since returning I have receivt'd 
notification- from the Chairman of the Examining Committee that I had passed the 
examination, making in the oral examination one hundred per cent., and in the 
written ninety-five per cent. 

At a meeting of our Mission on June l})th it was decided that Mr. Macrae and 
niy.self should have charge of w-ork in Ham Hung. 

My wife has devoted herself to language study, and such participation in 
Church work as her ability and health permitted. Since June I found it necessary 
to have a separate language teacher for her and was happy in securing a most 
excellent scholar, who is also a very efficient Christian w»»rker. 

Key. D. M. Macrae, reports as follows : 

In the month of February accomi)anie<l by Dr. and Mrs. Grierson and K<>v. 
M. (>. Fenwick, I crossed overland from Seoul to Wonsan. Household afliiiis 
liaving been arranged, the tusk of studying the language was begun. The coiu'se 
of study as drawn up by the American Board of examiners was followed. In Sej)- 
tember I took the examinations in Seoul — passed " creditably." 

Ithwratintj. — I was only able to take four trips into the county and spend in all 
twelve weeks itinerating. During that time I vi.sited Ham Hung, Hong Won, Took 
Chun, Pyol an Tai, Sin Chin, Fai Cho. So Ho. Chin Hung and An ry<m. 

Ham Hung a walled city, is the t-apital of Ham Kyong Do. The <listaiu'e from 
this city to Wonsan is about 100 miles. The population is estinnited at about 
40,000 (so otHcials say). Within the last few weeks a telegraph line has been com- 
pleted between this city and Wonsan. Here there are four baptized Christians, 
three men and one woman. On the recommendation of a session convened by Rev. 
J. 8. Gale, those were baptized by Rev. W. R. Foote. 



119 



VVIiile ill tlu' city iiu'i>tiiiKs \v«'iv hold evt-ry ninlit in tlu' hoiisf of Mr. Shin. 
During my n'<'«'iit visit tlu'iT wc liiul hlt'sscd iiu'ftin};s. Oiu' Siiiwluy morning two 
int'ii ami a luiiMlc aKt'<l la<1y walked in fn»in th«' (•cumtry scvcnti'cn inilrs to see us. 
Two SimdayH previtais tlu'y iicartl oftlu* Ji'sus doctriiu' from a iiativf. so they liud 
caint' to hear the nu'ssajjeitf < Jod to sinners. They reinaiiie<i with lis tw«> days and 
returned with iio(»l<s and tracts to their native village. As tiiey were leaving one 
of them said "tiiere is an aged man in the villaf!;e who would like to see you and 
hear al>out tiiis man Jesus." 

A middh> aged gentleman wlio at tirst came like >»'i«'odemus, recently (hvided 
for ('liri.st ; now liis wife and little hoy accompany him to the ineetiiifjs. He snid 
a few days before I left "pleas*' tarry with us a little longer. I have lu'en speaking 
to others about .Jesus and they seemed interested. 1 woidd like you to see them," 
and said he '• this iiouse is now too small for us and we will have to get a larger 
phure t<» worship in.'' He spoke with a heart ready to give. 

While we tarrieil there I l)elieve the Ijord chose out for himself s«'veral good 
lucn. Scan-ely a night went by without some soul enquiring earnestly into thiH 
new plan of salvation. Thirteen miles out from the city there is a man who walks 
in to service on Sunday mornings. The regular attendance at present is sixteen 
iiicii and si.\ or more women. The outlook is encouraging. Funds are needed so 
as to locate missionaries in this city. 

So Ho the port of Ham Hung, is seven miles from the city. \ week was spent 
iicre. hooks were sold and a time of seed sowing spent among the villages. 

Hong Won is a large .seaport town, thirty-three miles north from Ham Hunpf. 
Here there is one man who was bapti/.ed in the city of Ham Hung, by Rev. W. H. 
Foott'. on recomnuMidation of a sessi«>n convened by Rev. J. S. Gale. This man tirst 
iu'iUHl of Christ from a Korean, now he ha.s told the story tt) others; while there 
his mother and two other men took part in prayer in the meetings. An old grey 
bearded gentlemen (a confuciani.st at one time) also lottk his stand for Christ, but 
has now moved l()-> miles inlaiul. God grant that he may in that |)art of tlut 
country hear witness for his .Master. 

I'ook Chun is a large walled city sixty miles north of Ham Hung, and has a 
garrison of ;{()() soldiers. A few days were spent in this citv and a number of bouk» 
sold. 

Pyol An Tai, in this village seven mi.es from the city of IViok Chun there is 
one who itrofesses faith in Chri.st. Last nummer after the death of his wife tlu* 
villagers cailled upon him to sacrifice to his ancestorsand appease the wmth of the 
s](irits. This he refused to do and as a result sullered persecution. His hou.se was 
i)roi<en into, l)Ooks burned and he was .severly beaten. His greatest enemies were 
tlie sons of his own household. He stood (irm through it all and witnessed a good 
ci)nfession of his faith in (}od. 

Sin Chin a large seaport town is the port of Took Chun. This is as far north 
as I have been, coasting steamers <'all here, several days were spent in this village. 

Fai Cho, a seaport village of about 400 houses is twenty miles from the city of 
Ham Hung. Mr. Shin was here a few months ago and j»reached to the people. At 
that time a number expressed a desire to become Christians. I found on visiting 
the village that persecution ha<l set in. Those who seemed interested were mostly- 
young men and their parents threatened to starve them if they give up ancestral 
worsliip. However, when all would be quiet at night those young men would 
gather in our room to study the Words of Life. One young man braved all threats 
and persecution. He took part in the meetings, in prayer and by a <juiet word of 
testimony. A great many of the villagers came daily to consult about the doctrine. 
Being the first foreigner to visit the village there was ipiite an excitement among- 
the villagers especially the women who violated the Korean code of etiquette by 
l>oldly standing in the doors and windows to havea look at the "moksa" (pastor). 

One striking feature in labouring among this people is their readiness to admit 
that they are sinners and that in this world there are none righteous. To-day 
they lend a ready ear to the preaching of the gospel. Doors are open on every 
hand. All honor and glory to God for the triumphs that have beeu won. It i» 



120 

with a heart t'lill of grutitii<le to (rotl for the mercies iiixl opitortuuitics of tiio year 
that I l)eg louvi' to submit tiiis l)rit'f report. 



K«»RKAN KXI'KNDITURE. 



'^i ^ I 




Ainoiiiit i)iii<l on aocouiit of Korea from April 1st, 181>!>, to 

\pril 1st, l!>00 $;j,421 «♦> 

i^Your Committee have received a very urgent ai)peal fron> the Korean Missimi- 
arie.s for rein foreenients. They give strong reasons why these addilioual mission- 
aries should he sent to them immediately. Your Committee thought well to give 
these reasons in the terms of their own appeal, in whieh they say : — 

In the Fii'st plaee we call your attention to the enormous size of this fu'ld. 
representing two and a half out of tlu^ thirteen provinces of Korea, with thirty-live 
large magisterial towns and iluiumerahle villages, a coast line of •"»()(» miles, and a 
popidation ai)proaching one million souls. All this lield has '■>ceu entru.sted to mir 
charge, and in it we arc the strongest force with oidy one Methodist and one Inde- 
pendent missionary (now absent) as fellow labourers. 

In the Second place we a.ssure you that the whole field is accessible to mission 
work. On the one hand there is an enquiring and receptive people, and on tiif 
other a growing native church full of zeal for the conversion of their fellow- 
countrymen. 

In the Third place you will notice that we do not ask you to support cateehists, 
colporteurs, native jiastors and school teachers, or to build school houses, colU-gts 
and churches. Nor do we ever ])ropose to ask for money from home f<»r such pur- 
poses, since all these will be provided here through the devotion and liberality nt' 
the native Christians themselves, as reports from all over the land will show. 

Finally we would have you believe that the prime necessity for this Held is an 
adequate force of trained foreign leaders. The great work of the mission is to 
follow up, organize, and superinten<l the work already begun by the natives, and 
to train the natural leaders for active service, with the view of establishing an 
independent native church. 

The Committee, however, in view of the extensive work already on their 
hands, and more particularly in view of the state of the funds at that time, felt 
constrained to inform the missionaries that "in the present condition of matters 
they do not see their way clear ju.st now to increase the number of missionaries in 
Korea." Directions were however given to publish the appeal as well as the 
reports, .so that all the facts might come before the Church as soon as possible, and 
to carry out these directions they are embodied almost in full in your Committee's 
report. 

The W. F. M. Society has continued to carry on its good work. Their last 
annual report shows that during the ])ast eleven years their contributions amount 
in the Eastern Division to $78,398.40, and in September last they paid into the 
Foreign Mission and Korean Funds no le.ss than $10,582.50, distributed as 
follows : — 

For New Hebrides, including one half of Miss Symond'ssalary$l,182 50 

" St. Lucia 1,000 00 

'< Trinidad 5,000 00 

" Demerara 1,100 00 

" Korea 1,000 00 

" General Foreign Mission Fund 1,300 00 

Total $10,582 50 

For *his generous help, your Committee feel deeply grateful. 



1-21 



UNANCKH. 



LuHt year the Eastern Division of the I'onuuitteo reported a debt of ♦'2, 138.26 
aKiiiiist the General Fiunl, and a luihmee or!!<U,(i;i8.r)ii in favour of Korea, thus giving 
a net balance In favour of the Missionu of !|<5()().2«). 

This year the debt on the ordinary Fund at the closing of the accounts was 
|.")71.48, while 'lie balance in favour of the Korean Fund was ♦2,()8'2.5(», giving a net 
balance in favour of the Missions at that date of if I,')! 1.(I2 

The receipts for the year Just closed were for the (ieneral Fund !p28,4;37.0'J, as 
against $31,512.09 for the previous year ; for the Korean Fund, f3,(H(;,«!3, as against 
f5,2r)0.0!> for the year preceding, making a total falling off on both funds of 
I'), 308. 53. It should be noted, however, that the be(piests which came into the 
fund during 1890-1000, amounted to only J7")0, while those which became available 
in the previous year reached the sum ol'|3,229.7r>, thus accounting for a diflerence 
of $2, 470. 70 from this source of revenue alone. 

On the other hand our expenditure on all the fields has been smaller. The 
diderence in the New ]Iebrides is small, but about $2,000 less has been paid on 
account of Korea, mainly because travelling e.\|)enses and outfit were included in 
the previous year, and upwards of $1,000 of what was due Trinidad remaining 
unpaid on April 1st, 1900. These statements will explain why with a smaller 
income your Committee are less in debt. 

Your Committee, as well as the u iiole Church, and very sjiecially the mission- 
aries in the Field, have to mourn the removal by death of the Kev. 1*. M. Mor- 
rison. D.I)., whose services in connection with the Foreign Mission work of the 
Clnirch were .so valuable and so highly appreciated. 



:^'' 



IV.— INDIAN MISSIONS- IN MANITOBA AND THE NORTH-WEST 

TERRITORIES. 



Thirty-four years ago Rev. James Nisbet began mi.ssion work amongst the 
Indians in the Saskatcliewan. To-day work is carried on at the following 
nineteen points, by missionaries whose names are given at the beginning of the 
report. 

1. Mistawaais Reaerre. — There are forty-eight families, fifty-five communicants, 
of whom nineteen were recently added, and forty-seven in the Sabbath school. 
Mi.ss Gillespie the teacher, keeps seven of the children in her father's bouse, from 
Monday till Friday, because of the distan ce of the school from their homes. 

2. Prince Albert. (Makoce Waste). — This mission in cluu'ge of two ladies, is 
patiently and prayerfully cultivated. There are seventeen children in the school. 
Several little girls are kept in the mission house and one boy who had his foot 
amputated. Regular religions services, committing of texts, gardening, the 
disappearance of ])agan rites amongst the elders, and truancy amongst the 
younger, are the hope and reward of the missionaries. 

3. Regina.- -This is j>robably the most successful In(Jusiriai scftooj in Western 
Canada. There are 130 j)ui»ils on the roll, with an average attendance of 111. 
Each year a number graduate, and one of the graduates is now on the staff. 
During the summer, many of the pupils, as well as many of the graduates, find 
employment amongst the white population, and earn from $12 to $35 a month. 

The religious interest in the school is always encouraging. There are thirty 



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cotniniinicaiitH anioiif^st tlu> pupils. ■ Their rcliKiouH life fliids cxprosHioii in con- 
tribiitions to tiic fainiiu> fuiKl, iiiinHioii wurl< at iii>iiu> and al>r(>a(l, and otiur <-lainiH 
that iircHont tln'n>s»'lvi's. 

4. File /////«.— Tlu'i-e arc twenty-one children in the «hiy school, and thirteen 
in the lloim. Mv. and Mrs. Alex. Skeene, di<l excellent work here for ten years. 
He is now in the lie^ina Industrial School. Mr. Stewart who succeeded him, has 
already resijincd and a successor has not yet l)cen appointed. 

.'*. Hound Lakf. — The Kev. II. .MacKay still imlils on his ev«'n way. In the 
benutiful Honu- and sclatol on I{«>und Lake, in the (iu'Api»elle Valley, there are 
thirty children. The Indians on one of the Kcserves. known as Kewistahaw's 
RcHerve, are huildin); a church for thcuisrlves. the old chief of eij^hty years, hein^ 
the moving s|)irit. The nu'U p't the material together, one woman <»IIers t«t scrub 
the lloor, and another suhscrihed $'>i, ex-pui»ils of the school subscribed S'50, and 
other outsiders helji. It will be completed and inv from debt by July 1st. There 
are twenty-Hve communicants on tlu' Ueserves, six added during the year. 

6'. CrowHtdxd. — This also is a boarding school. There are thirty-nine children 
in the school. A new building has been erected at a cost of !?3, ()()(>. improving the 
conditions of work. There is a neat church six miles from the school, but (luring 
the winter the .services were coiulucted in the Honie. 

7. Birth'. — In this boarding school there are forty-tW(» children enrolled. The 
large stone building in which the work is done has been enlarged this yt'ar at a 
cost of $3,000. lioys and girls, large enough, seek service during the sumnuT 
months. The Indians have become more sympathetic. The leaven is .slowly 
working. 

rV. Jiird Tail. — This lU'serve is ministered to by the liev. J(»hn 3IcArthur, iu 
connection with two Home Mission Stations. They have twenty-five communi- 
cants, with an attendance at Sabbath services of thirty, and nine at weekly i»rayer 
meeting. The only Indian Woman's Foieign ^li.ssionary Society Auxiliary is at 
this station. They contiiiaited ia<t year r^'.V^. The congregation gave $47 besides 
to the Schemes of the Church. 

9. Okaiime. — There are fcMty-four comnuuiicants and sixty in attendance at 
morning service. There are twelve children in school. The Indians are this year 
building a church at their own expense-. ,in<l have asked the Woman's Foreign 
Mis.sionary Society to send no more clothing lor adults, a.s they can now jjrovide 
for themselves. They contributed last year $21.*J"> for Foreign Missions, and $12.15 
for the Famine Fund. 

JO. Rolling Hirer. — Six or seven years ago the Indians riotously and defiantly 
mocked the missionary and refused to listen to his message. Now they meet 
regularly for woi-ship. and seven jtrofess faith in (Miri.st. They are building new 
and comfortable houses, and are becoming iudustiiwus. 

11. Portmje la Prairie. — In the boarding school liiere are twenty-three children 
making good i)rogress. The Indian village three miles away and visited regularly, 
is by better homes, cleanly habits, industry, temjierance, attendance at wor.ship, 
etc., giving evidence of jirogress. The mission childien attend the town Siuulay 
school and get the benefit of books, ita])ers. etc., used in the school. 

12. PipoHtone. — The missionary John Thunder, a native wori-er under the 
supervision of the neighbouring Home missionary, and !iji- a good influence over his 
people. There are nine comnuuiicants and they contriimted $30, for mission 
purposes. 

hi. Hurrieane Hills. — This is one of the ])laces where the work is imiuiired by 
the Government in encouraging the establishment of a Roman Catholic church in 
a Reserve already occujtied and with a population of less than 250. The chief and 
several of the head men protested, hut to no i)urpose. Resides regular Sabbath 
services by Mr. McKen/ie, Mrs. McKenzie docs much to help the women to a 
better way of living. She teaches a young men's Bible class, which has thirty- 
eight on the roll. She also teaches sewing, bread-umking, house-keeping, etc., all 
of which tend ui)ward. 



m 



t^. Lhanl Poinl. — Tlu> IndiiinH liavc placol on llu* Kroiiiul tlit> iiiatcritil for a 
IK'W log cliurch. TluTc wit*- Ht'Vi'ml vuhvh of coiivci-Hioii during llu- yi-ar. Tho 
mission \» now vacant, Mr. John Ulack having; ti'n<lfi'e<l liin resignation. 

15. Afoone Mountain. — This mission oni.v li«>f;iin t'onr years ago, Ih Itfcoinlng 
t'niitl'ni. The attciKhmcc in the Missi«»n Hall is not good, lint the missionary visitH 
the tents and homes, and often they follow from tent to tent to hear more. Many 
III' them raise enough eattle and grain for eomfort. 

/<». />aA7'«/'»»f/.— The three Reserves — Plapot's I'asqnnh's and Mnseowpetting'H, 
I'overed hy this mission, hav«' he»'n rather harren soil. Change of missioimries, tho 
tlnifting of ehildr«>n to Hegina, the intrigues of Roman C'atholi<'s. have conspired to 
(Irfent the work. The present missionary is faithfully visiting from t«'nt to tent 
ami hopj'ful of resulttf, although no <-onverslons are reported. 

17. Loin/ /'/(ij'/i, Iiul'mnfont and Sintn LakcH. — This is new ground. Mr. 
Itohert McKay, s<»n (»f Rev. John McKay, f«>r many y«'ars missiomiry at Mistawusis 
is the missionary at these points. He s|ieaks the Indian language tluently, and 
was welcomed Ity the Swun Lake hand, but the Long Plain Indians said they would 
have nothing to do with any me.s.senger of Christianity. It is initial work. Kind- 
ness and charity will overcome. 

m. Willetj Hirer. — This point is thirty-tive or forty miles from Li/ard Point, 
and it was proposed to work the two together, hut that has n«>t proved satisfactt»ry. 
It will he plaee«l in the future under the care of the Home Missionary at 
(Hcnlyon. 

I!). lAike of thi' Woods. — There are 50'^ In'Mans on the wi'st side of the liake <»f 
the Woods, f(»r which no provision is nnule. The Rev. Austin McKittrick, has been 
appointetl. It is hoped that hy and hy a hoarding school will he established. 

(torcrnmnU druntn. — For each pu|)il at the Rcgina Industrial School #120 per 
|iupil ; $72 Iter pupil in the Hoarding Schools at Round Lake, Crowstand, Hirtle, 
File Hills, and Portage la Prairie ; an<l #800 a year to each day school at 
Mistawasis, Prin<'e Albert and Okanaso. 

Summarif. — Within the bounds of Manitoba and the Xorth-West pntvinces the 
Presbyterian Church has nineteen missions, three of which have Ipeen opened within 
the la.st year. There are in the.se missions 257 communicants, six' lioarding and 
Industrial schools, with an (Mirollment of 280, and an avi-rage attendance of 257. 
There are also three day schools with ;in cii'-'llment of sixty -eight and an average 
attendance of thirty. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



TREASURER OF MANITOBA .\ni) NORTH-WEST INDIAN WORK. 

For the Year Ending March 31st, 1900. 

KtrriptH. 
Received from Rev. Dr. Warden #24,055,00. 

Expenditure. 

Paid for salaries f 13.201 00 

" '• Building account {t,582 77 

" " Interpreting 432 00 

" "Insurance 228 10 

" " Travelling expenses of missionaries. lOfi !>y 

" " Maintenance account 145 79 

" " Domestic service 92 00 

" " Furnishing 71 40 

" " Convener's expen.ses 134 95 

$24,0.55 OO 




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Th<> following Ih th(> di'tallod cxiMnditure of the above ♦24,or)r(.no, 
Hhowiii^ uinoiiiit |H>rtuiiiiiig to ouch licld : 

Beulah : 

Ki'v. .lolin McArtluir |40(» (K) 

Interprt'tiiiK •_>.') oo 

|i42.-) 00 

Mr. \V. J. Siiiull iji4<;l> .'»0 

MiHH Aniiit! McLaren 4')0 00 

Miss Matilda McFiCod W'ti) 00 

Miss Josie t'ullin, substitute 120 00 

Building, etc 4,01 7 or) 

Insurance DO oo 

♦r),4!to ir. 

Ci'ou'ufand: 

Rev. Neil (MImour #S00 00 

Miss Josephine Pet«!h, teacher 404 00 

Miss Jeannie Gilmour, matron IWS 00 

Miss Isabel Currie, assistant matron. . . . 180 00 

Miss Sarah Dunbar, assistant matron . . 4o 00 

Out-door lussistant ISO 00 

Travelling expenses. Miss Dunbar 4o "Jo 

Interpreting? l.'il .")0 

Buildin^r, etc r),:{;?.'i 7<{ 

InsUiance "JS 00 

*7,r)27 51 

File Hills: 

Mr. Alexander Skene |;]r)0 00 

Mr. E. C. Stewart 800 00 

Travelling expenses, Mr. Stewart 22 2!) 

Miss Jeannie Webster, assistant matron. 180 00 

Domestic service !)2 00 

Furnishing .'>!) 00 

Maintenance TjO 00 

$1,05.'^ 2i> 

Hurricane J fills. • 

Rev. E. McKenziL- $700 00 

Interpreting 84 00 

Maintenance 10 7!) 

Insurance 87 10 

$831 81) 

Lak-e of the Woods: 

Travelling expenses of the Rev. Au.stin 

G. McKittrick $!77 10 

.*77 10 

Lakesend: 

Mr. Campbell H. Munro $900 00 

Insurance <)2 00 

$l)G2 00 



, 125 

Lizard Point: 

U»'V. I). Cai.iiiii <'ii 

Mr. John Hlufk 

Biiihiiiijf, »'tc 

[iilt'i'pi't'tiiiK 

FuriiisliinK 

Loiii/ I'litiiiH; 

• Mr. UolM'it McKay 

'Pravt'llinm'xjH'iiHt's, Mr. H()l)ort McKay 

MiHtiin'iiHiH: 

Uev. W. S. Miu.ie 

Misrt Kutt! (iilleHpic. teacher 

Huiltliii);, etc 

Maiiitciiancc 

• 
MooHf Mounlaiii; 

Ml-. F. T. Dotldw 

Building, etc 

Okanme : 

Mr. R. ('. McPhcrson 

Interpreting^ 

Pippntonc: 

Mr. John Thunder 

Building, etc 

Prince Albert: 

Miss Lucy M. Baker 

Miss Bell Lyttle 

Portage la Prairie: 

Mi.ss Annie Fraser 

Miss Sarah Laidlaw 

Mrs. Sutherland, assistant nnitron .... 

Building, etc., repairs 

Furnishing 

Maintenance 

Interpreting 

Insurance 

Soiling River: 

Mr. W. J. Wright 

Building, etc 



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Round Lake: 

Rev. Hugh McKay 

Mrs. McKay, matron 

Mr. D. A. McKay, teacher 

Mr, G. W. Sahlinark, teacher . . . 
Mr. Jacoh Bear 

Convener's expenses for the year 
Total 



*{)00 00 
300 00 




75 00 




375 00 




3r.O 00 






$2,010 00 
*134 95 






$24,055 00 


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v.— JAPAN. 





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FORMOSA-. 

After the destructive storms reported last year, the repairing!; of damajicd 
churches and the erection of new ones, is the prominent feature of this years 
report. How unselfislily, even heroically, the native Christians met the situati(»ii, 
appears in *!iis report. Mr. Gauld is in Canada on furlough. Dr. G. L. ^lacKay 
reports witu his usual courage and hopefulness. 

I. — Under Japanese Rule. — The year 1899, was marked by foreigners coming 
under Jajtanese administration here. No violent changes were introduced, hut 
there were change." liowever. 

(I). Our mission had five schools for children in the country and one at 
Tamsui. the latter we thought might develop into a middle .school. Government 
regulations were such that we closed them at once, and thus avoided needless 
trouble. The mission will not lose much thereby. 

(2). Taxes had to be paid on mission premises. 

(3). But then passports Avere not needed when travelling inland. 

Ignorant otficers blundered, but the Formosan Government did not obstruct 
Christian work. On the contrary, they seemed friendly disposed towards all our 
labourers. 

II. — New Stations. — North of ^w-/rtrt<7andnear the sea, there is a large Hsliing 
village called Goa-po. Quite a number of the people heard the Gospel at Au-lang 
and desired to be taught Christianity in their own village. One man put a small 
dwelling house at the disposal of a preacher for a few months. Then the 
converts erected a neat, substantial chapel. It was finished last December and at 
that date thirty were able to read the Gospel and sing praises to the Lord 
our God. 

Ai-liaii-kha, has a population of 1,463 Hak-kas. It is situated near the base 
of a mountain range, seven miles south-east from Au-lang. One Lhn Sin — who is 
versed in Chinese classics — visited a Christian near Chhan-liau and saw a hynui 
book on the table. He borrowed it, returned home and read till midnight. Tlie 
following day and night were given to the study of the wonderl'ul book ! At last, 
he said to his family, " I have found the true religion and wish you to accept it." 
He forthwith went about exhorting friends and neighbors to worship the true God. 
The result was that about 100 people gave Yeul40 for an old dwelling liouse, 
repaired it for Yen83, and fitted it for public worship at a cost of Yen64. 

On December 20th, three preachers and Koa Kau accompanied me to the 



127 



villa;,'.. We wore met by four well dres.sed Urotliers, the leader being Lim Sin — 
ami e.scorted through the streets to the plaee of worship. Fully 100 who professed 
faith in Jesu.s Chri.st wei-e waiting outside to welcome us. Thirty painted benches 
(uot yet dry) were in front of the building. We just entered, stood and sang our 
battle ery " I'm not ashamed to own my Lord, or to defend His cau.se." After 
extracting many teetli, a .short walk took us to Lim 8in's farm house and we were 
delighted with the large household. 

III. — City More Activk Tjian Country Churchks. — The Tsui-tnq-kha 
Christians contributed liberally, rei)aired their chapel, and at the end of tne year 
the :itten(hince was double that of 1898. The Toa-tui-tia believers, renovated iheir 
church and increased their membership. Tvk-chham has the largest church. Si.ice 
the opening crowds attended. iJut Bang-Kab is the most prosperous church in 
North Formosa ! The preacher there was once a fierce foe — a determined enemy 
of the cross. He is a valiant soldier now in the Christian ranks. 

I\^ — Century Memorial Church. — Believers in Jesus Christ, at all our 
stations contributed towanls erecting a Century Memorial Church at Sau-kak-cng. 
The following are some of the ct)ntributions :- In-khut-a, Yeno ; Tho-gu, Yen30 ; 
Tam-sui. Yen 50 ; Chhaii-liau. Yen.SO ; Sin-tiam, YenoO; Tek-chham, Yen87; Geh- 
!)ai, Yen3(J ; Bang-kali, Yen 100. Here is an object lesson. Bang-kah was helped 
aiul now helpx others. . 

V. — Oxford Collecje. —My application to the Formosan Government regarding 
Oxford College was granted and we closed the year with thirty-one students, and 
every month added to their devotediiess. 

VI. — Girls' School. — This Ijullding was used throughout the year for teaching 
Bible women and wives of students. 

VII. — MacKay Hospital. — There are many dispensaries and doctors in North 
Formosa, still we attended to l.:?;U new and 2.84S old patients. We value the 
ojiportunity this work gives for making known the only Healer of Souls. 

A^III. — Progress throughout the year 1899. 

Tek-chham, gave towards their church building Yei 1,120 00 

Toa-thi-tia, gave for mission purposes 830 ((0 

Bang-kah, gave for mission purposes 208 00 

Sin-tiam, gave for mission purposes 250 00 

Taui-tng-kha, gave for mission purposes 17a. 00 

Ke-htug, gave for mission ]>urpo.ses (58 00 

(feh-bai, gave for mission purposes 90 00 

These are examples of contributions according to the strength of the Stations. 

We re-opened Tiong-lek chapel, it was closed all along since the JapiUiese 
came. 

We re-opened Loan-loan, work was not carried on there for several years. 

Outside Tek-chham city a new chapel was opened. Five (5) families in 
Tanisui gave up their idols and are studying the Bible, and are regular hearers. 
One hum'.vd and seventy-four (174) were ba|)tized. Fifty (50) idols and thirty (80) 
ancestral tablets were given up and placed in my museum. 

There were noted and triumithant deaths. 

Christians showed greater steadfastness. 

Preachers laboured with more devotion. 

Students were exceptionally good. 

I am not writing about this year 1900, but will state that to-day we are in the 
midst of progressive and aggressive work. The God of battles is with us. So we 
can .sing "Onward Christian Soldiers.'' " Looking unto Jesus." 

G. L. MacKAY. 






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128 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



TREASURER OF FORMOSA MISSION. 
For the Year Ending December 31st, 1899. 

1. General Work. 
Receipts, Oold. 
Balanceoii hand, Jauuarylst, 1899, ($3,303.49) Yen6,8f)(l 22 
Reraittances from Rev. Dr. Warden, Toronto. 15,643 35 
Paid for Mission by Rev. Dr. Warden, Toronto. 592 38 

Received per Rev. A. McLean, Blyth 515 52 

Received per Mr. W. T. McKenzie 35 23 

Sales of Chinese religious literature 80 25 

Interest 97 45 

Yen23,860 40 

Expenditure. 

Salary of Rev. G. L. Mackay, D.D Yen3,029 19 

" Rev. W. Gauld 1,264 09 

" Dr. A. N. Wilkinson 552 50 

" Pastors, preachers and students ... 7,282 44 

" Bible women 1,175 08 

" Teachers 312 28 

" Japanese preacher 300 68 

College and Girls' School, Coolies and labor. . 439 78 

Travelling expenses, pastors and preachers. . 2,987 24 

Assi.stance, students, etc 534 50 

Repairing ancl building chapels 3,982 87 

Chinese religious literature 337 80 

Exchange 143 29 

Assistance, Preachers, examination time 164 44 

Japanese doctor re hospital 50 77 

Taxes and insurance 132 90 

Rentals '. 41 00 

Stationary, telegrams, etc 63 43 

College chairs, etc 39 20 

Balance on hand, December 31st, 1899 1,026 32 

Yen23,86 ; 40 

2. Mackay Hospital. 

Receipts. ci<*id. 

Balance on hand, January 1st, 1899, (.f99.03). . Yen201 23 
Paid by Rev. Dr. Warden for drugs in England . 508 29 

Medicines re-sold 31 26 

Local subscriptions 855 60 

Yenl,596 38 

Expenditure. 

Drugs from London, Euglaml Yen508 29 

Duty on drugs from England 57 45 

Hospital assistance and cr o'ie 253 40 

Balance on hand, December 31st, 1899 777 24 

Yen 1,596 88 

N.B.— One Yen is the equivalent of a lit tie less than 48 cents, Canadian currency. 



129 



VI.— ClilNA. 



The Staff of the Canadian rRESBYTEiiiAN Mission in North Honan. 

Name. Date of arrival in China. 

Rev. Jonathan Uofoilh March 2nd, 1888. 

William McClure, B.A., M.D October 4th, 1888. 

Rev. Donald MacGilliviay, M.A., B.D December 1st. 1888. 

Rev. Murdock MacKen/ie November 8th, 1889. 

Miss Margaret I. Macintosh November 19th, 1889. 

William Malcolm, M.D October 1.5th. 1892. 

Rev. William Harvey Grant, B.A October 19th, 1892. 

Rev. James Alexander Slimmon March, 1895. 

Rev. Robert Alexander Mitchell, B.A September 20th, 1895. 

Rev. James Menzies, M.D November 9th, 1895. 

Miss Jennie I. Dow, M.B November 9th, 1895. 

Miss Mina A. Pyke October 10th, 1896. 

Percy Campbell Leslie, M.D November 7tli, 1897. 

Rev. .Tohn Griffith, B.A November 7th, 1897. 

Miss Margaret S. Wallace, M.D September 18th, 1898. 

Rev. Thomas Craigie Hood, B.A October, 1899. 

Rev. J. R. Harcourt, B.A., Alission Address, Chang Te Post Office, via 
Tient.sin, China. 



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ch'u WANG STATION. {Perfecture of Chang Te.) 

Members : — Dr. and Mrs. William McClure, Dr. P. C. Leslie, Miss. M. I. 
Macintosh, Miss J. I. Dow, M.B., Mr. and Mrs. M. MacKenzie. 

Station Work. — Work in all departments has been carried on largelx- along the 
lines laid down in former years. Regular preaching in the street chapel by the 
helpers or missionary in charge has been conducted daily all the year round. 
Visiting patients in the hospital wards and making known the good tidings to 
them has been kept up continuously. There has been a large iucr^abe in the quan- 
tity of Christian literature sold and many patients were diligently trying to learn 
to read. The attendance in chapel has varied from between twenty to thirty in 
the busy season to eighty or ninety in the slacker times. The spirit shown and 
the intere.st manifested were such as to encourage us in carrying on these branches 
of the work. 

Morning worship in Chinese for Christians and heathen was carried on by the 
missionaries for over six mouths as formerly. It was decided to divide the work 
latterly so as to enable those not yet acquainted with the most elementary truths 
to hear by themselves. In this way heathen and Christian now hear the truth the 
same hour in different rooms. The same method ha.s been adopted in the afternoon 
.services on the Lord's Day and thus far it has worked well in each case. A better 
opportunity is thus afforded of seeking to win for Christ those who arc yet 
darkened idolaters, while our Christians are helped to grow in grace and in the 
knowledge of Christ. Chinese services have been conducted by the missionaries 
on the forenoon and afternoon of each Lord's Day, and by the natives on Sal>bath 
and Wednesday evenings. 

The Sacrament of Barcism was administered three times and that of the Lord's 
Supper obsei'ved twice during the year, fourteen men and three women were 
carefully examined, and, having finished their probationary period, were received 
into full membership on their profession of faith in Jesus Christ. The names of 
eight men and three women were added to our list of catechumens. 



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130 

Station Claaaes. — Two claHses for the instructiou of catechumens and enquirers 
were held, the first from February 14-22 ; the second from November 23-27. 
Twenty-five men attended on each occasion and ten villages were represented. 
Four and three classes respectively were instructed by the missionaries and Chris- 
tian teachers from two catechisms, the Gospel of John and the Acts of the Apostles. 
At the evening meetings addresses were given on " Jacob," " Joseph," " Joshua," 
"Adam and Christ," "The Church of Christ," "Christian giving," and "Sabbath 
Observance. ' ' A stereopticon exhibition of Scripture scenes open to all was also 
given and was well attended by the members of the classes and the towns peopU'. 
The transition from support by mission funds to self support was made at the 
February class and seemed to meet with the approval of the senior Christians. 
Younger men and some who are very poor, complained of the change at first, but 
we are satisfied that it is a step in the right direction and will gradually meet witli 
more cordial approval on the part of all our Christians. 

Helpers. — The American Presbyterian Mission has again favoured us by send- 
ing two helpers as in by-gone years. These brethren rendered faithful service and 
cheerfully undertook the duties assigned to them. The feeling has gradually 
grown upon us that some of the converts from our own field may with advantag*' 
be used in this work now, and the present seems an opportune time for making 
this change, Our heartiest thanks are due to our American brethren for the aid so 
readily given, and to Mr. Li the mission owes a debt of gratitude for seven years 
devoted service, rendered in an unostentatious and Christ-like spirit. 

Field Work. — An attempt has been made this year to begin the systematic visita- 
tion of certain districts in the vicinity of some of out oitstatious. With this in view 
Mr. McKenzie, accompanied by a Christian helper visited ninety villages in the spring. 
By staying at the outstations it was possible to have meetings with the Christians 
each night and to itinerate during the day. An average of three villages was thus 
overtaken in one day, and some thousands of persons brought within the hearing 
of the Gospel. While the people in a few cases were quite apathetic, and some 
prepared to be hostile, the workers were kindly received generally, and many per- 
sons listened attentively to the truth and conversed readily when opportunity was 
given them. To yield results this work would require to be followed up by 
repeated visits from the missionary and the native helpers. Were this done, many 
persons as yet unreached might be won for Christ. All the districts in which we 
have Christians or enquirers were frequently visited during the year. Four of the 
native brethren assisted the Hsin Chen brethren at the annual fair in Hsun Hsien, 
and three of these also gave valuable help at the November fair in Ch'u Wang. 

New Chapel. — Work was Carried on in the building which has been used as 
chapel for eight years till the month of May. On the completion of the new build- 
ing in that month the old was abandoned and daily preaching conducted in the 
new. It is 42 x 19 feet, and well adapted for our work, being under the same roof 
as the dispensary, as was the case with the former one. The mission is indebted 
to the pastor and people of Crescent St. Church, Montreal, for the funds with 
which this and other buildings have been put up. 

Health. — Mrs. MacKenzie suffered from a severe attack of illness in the spring 
and for a time it seemed as if she might have to return to Canada. It was decided 
that she should spend the summer at Pei Tai Ho and through the goodness of God 
she has returned almost completely restored. Dr. Dow, Miss Macintosh and Dr. 
Leslie also spent a few mouths at the same place and returned greatly invigorated 
to their work. Those who remained on the field were blessed with good health 
throughout. 

Drought. — There has been no rain fall in Honan this year and as a result of 
this an entire failure of some crops. Appeals for help are already coming in, but 
it Inu, not been thought advisable to undertake relief work of any kind as yet. 
Ere the spring of next year sets in it is to be feared that multitudes will suffer for 
lack of the barest necessities of life. Our station class has been affected by this 
cause and measures of some kind may be necessary to give temporary aid to the 
most needy heathen and Christians. 



131 



Change. — By appointment of Presbytery at last annual meeting, Mr. (irant left 
this station in February to begin work in the Hsiu (.'hen district. This has left 
the station with but one pastor to carry on the increasing work at the central and 
outstations. Unless provision is made in some form for more assistance certain 
departments of the work must for a time sutler. 

Outlook, — It is with devout gratitude to God we record the fact that the work 
has gone on uninterruptedly for another year. Our sister mission of the American 
Board in Shantung have had the grief of seeing a deliberate attempt made to 
destroy the work which they have so faithfully and perseveringly striven for 
twenty years to build uj). Reports from the seat of trouble in the south in spring 
and the long continued drought in thb autumn, caused much uneasiness among 
the people generally, but our work was in no way interfered with. There is con- 
tinued evidence of a friendly spirit towards us among the people. Visits to the 
compound by the loca' and other officials were made during the year and they 
have responded to any call made on them for aid. Four of those recorded this 
year are natives of Ch'u Wang and others seem partly interested. The attendance 
in the chapel at the annual fair in November was very large, the preaching by our 
native Christians thoroughly evangelical and the interest manifested as encouraging 
as has been seen thus far in Ch'u Wang. The number of persons who understand 
that Christ and Christianity are indispensable to China's regeneration is continually 
increasing, and so too the numberof those who are thoroughly convinced that faith 
in Christ as a Saviour is their duty, but who are meantime deterred through lack of 
courage from facing the obloquy consequent on the open acknowledgment of the 
Christian religion. Frequent conversation with our native Christians convinces us 
that there are those among them who are understanding the true nature of the 
Gospel of Christ more clearly year by year, and who desire to have their lives fully 
controlled by its teachings. It is pleasant to observe evidence of the growth in 
some men too, of the Christian fraternal spirit, and to know that it is manifesting 
itself in practical form. Early in the year the carejess observance of the Sabbath 
in certain districts caused us a good deal of anxiety but the impression made by 
tlie confession of these men themselves towards the close of the year is that they 
have resolved to observe the day of God more carefully and use it for its divinely 
instituted purposes. The auspicious signs are increasing and we enter on tht? new 
decade believing that a time to favour Honan is dawning, and that Christ will ere 
long be formed in an ever-increasing number of "hearts as the hope of glory, while 
men will see the K.ngdom, which is righteousness, peace and joy in the Holy 
Ghost, extending in many parts of Honan and neighbouring provinces. 



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OUT8TATIONS. {Ill connection With Cli'u Wang.) 



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Shlh P'an. — The change to self support in the station classes seemed to dampen 
the ardor of one or two men there, and opi)osition of friends has caused one nuin 
to go back to idolatry. Three of the catechumens have been baptized, one exam- 
ined but not yet accepted for baptism, and one additional recorded. Their jioverty 
caused some to imagine that Sabbath observance was not incumbent upon them, 
but latterly their attitude has been more satisfactor\'. 

Ton Kung. — The little chapel, referred to as prosi)ective in last year's report, 
was completed and ready for services in May. It is a very plain Chinese building, 
capable of seating about forty persons, and was opened with little del)t to be 
removed. A healthy spirit pervades the little Christian community. One of their 
number, a pedlar by profession, makes good use of the many opportunities afforded 
liim while pursuing his daily calling to declare the good tidings, and considerable 
numbers hear the Gospel through him annually. The cause of Christ should have 
steady progress in this district. 

Fu-en. — The leac'^r of the little church in this village had a new house erected 
during the year and he has generously placed part o^ it at the disposal of the 



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Christians for evening and Lord's Day meetings. Being invited to aid for a fow 
weeks in the street chapel in Ch'u Wang he hesitated about cok ing until arntngc- 
ments could he made wherehy it was reaHonahly certain that the cause of Christ 
would not suffer in his al)sence. This took place at a time when he was sufleriiifj; 
from the lack of the necessaries of life. Three men have been baptized from this 
village during tlie year. 

Hsin Tx'un. — Death has this year taken away the wife and one of the daughters 
of Wang Fu Lin, whose death was announced in last year's report. A ba'^kslidiuf; 
Protestant has rented premises to the Romanists and they have placed a pervert 
from the Hsin Chen region there as teacher. Our Christian leader is more than a 
matcii for him in candid reasoning and skilful argumentation and we do not expect 
that any will go over to Rome from conviction. Three persons were baptized from 
this village during the year and two of the catechumens have removed to Chan;>; 
Te Fu. For years there have l)€en somewhat untoward circumstances in tlii.s 
village, but we still cherish the hope that the Church of Christ is going to grow and 
prosjier there. 

Hui Liitif/. — The interest in Christian matters grows slowly in this town, the 
members are poor and busily engaged all the year around in the struggle for exist- 
ence. The hostile attitude of their friends is affecting some too. Appearances 
seem to indicate that the women are more courageous than the men, and are mak- 
ing in some cases more progress in Scripture knowledge. Two persons have been 
recorded as catechumens and one baptized this year. 



woman's work. {Ch'u Wang.) 



Work among the women has been steadily carried on throughout the year. 
During the summer months Mi-s. McClure kindly took charge of the Sabbath and 
week-day classes, so that in no branch has the work fallen behind. The good 
seed of the Kingdom has been sown, and although some of it may have fallen upon 
stoney places or by the wayside, yet we believe that much has fallen into good 
ground, wliich shall bear fruit even if it be " after many days." 

Station Work. — Some eight or nine women have attended public worshii) 
regularly on Sabbath mornings. The usual Bible Class met in the afternoons in 
the woman's chapel. In all forty-eight meetings have been held with an average 
attendance of twelve, being an increase of three over that of last year. 

A class taught by Mrs. MacKenzie began in October with five girls, four of 
whom came regularly twice a week to learn characters, and on Sabbath afternoon 
for a Bible lesson. They have read the first three chapters of Matthew's Gospel, 
three chapters of the "Peep of Day," half through the catechism, and several 
hymns. The brightest girl was- manned about a month ago, but has been back 
several times, and always comes in to learn a little more. 

Dr. Dow has conducted a Sabbath School class for little girls. Average atten- 
dance, seven. The girls are bright and learn quickly. No inducement whatever 
has been offered to these children but they seem to take a delight in coming, and 
instances have come under our notice of some of the lessons they have learned 
being taught to their elders at home. 

Sixty-three week-day meetings have been held throughout the year for 
wom<'n, with an attendance averaging ten. At one of these meetings Wen Chih 
Hsing medical assistant, gave an address on the sin of foot-binding, which was 
much appreciated by the women, but none h 'e as yet had the courage to 
unbind. Two other afternoons were devoted to quilting coverlets to be used by 
the women who come in from the out villages to attend our station classes. 

Station Clauses. — A small class was hold in March with four women in attend- 
ance, all from Hui Lung, a market town distant about ten miles. One of their 



u<iLi)«ii«wMg 



133 

number, Mrs. Chuu, a purticuluily bright and iutiM-eHtiug wuinuii, wu.s examined, 
aii'l afterwards had her uame recorded as a catecfhuiuen. She has read in Ium- own 
home the Gospels of Matthew. Mark and Luke, and while here got half way 
through John. While reading Mi-s. Chao had formed the habit of placing a mark 
opposite any characters she is not familiar with in order that she might ask the 
fir.>t person she met what they were. Two of the other women were already on 
prol)ation, while the fourth, who was here for the first time, had to begin at the 
first rudiments of the doctrine. In October a trip to Hni Lung was planned, but 
as wild rumours, occasioned by the long-continued drouth and consequent failure 
of the crops, were rilj everywhere, at the request of the Christians themselves the 
project was abandoned, and a circular letter issued instead, inviting all the women 
who were interested to come to Ch'u Wang to study. In response to this invita- 
tion two only could make it convenient to come, and they remained but a short 
time. Some weeks later, on a Sabbath morning, four other women arrived from 
tiie same place in time for the morning .service, but as the times were hard and 
money none too plentiful, they only .stayed three and-a-half days. It nuist be 
remembered that since the beginning of the year the Mission supplies fuel, light 
and bedding only, the members of these classes supplying their own food. 

Three women, two of whom reside in Ch'u Wang, have been recorded as 
catechumens, and two were baptized during the year. 

We are pleased to note that more literature has been sold this year to women 
than in ar.y previous year. 

During the annual tenth month fair hundreds of women were received, and 
amongst tliem we had not a few interested listeners. 

I'isits Paid in Town. — Through the tireless energy and zeal of Mrs. Chang 
many doors have been opened in Ch'u Wang. Forty-four visits have been made 
wltliiu the past eleven months, and we are continually hearing of others who 
would like to have us go and sit awhile in their homes. Some barely tolerated us 
and were glad when we rose to go, but the majority seemed pleased to listen while 
wc told them of a Saviour's love. 

Village Work. — As in last report we have nothing of particular interest or 
encouragement to tell. Some eighteen visits have been paid to neighbouring 
villages, and in this way the people are becoming better acquainted with us and an 
opportunity is thus afforded them of hearing the Gospel message. One case we 
will remember, that of a woman who had been trying to lay up merit by chanting 
vei-ses and doing good work, but who, on hearing the Gospel was inclined to 
listen and welcomed us to her home frequently ; she had also learned a hymn and 
a form of prayer. A few weeks ago we heard that this woman had been called to 
give in her account, but whether she died trusting in Jesus or still clinging to her 
idols we know not. Truly "the King's business requireth haste," and it behooves 
us to work while it is day, for the night cometh when no man can work. 

Medical Work. — The record of medical work covers only six and one-half 
months, dispensary having been closed from the beginning of the .Mission year 
(December 1st) until the middle of January and again duiing the four summer 
months. 





Number of patients treated 601 

" treatments • • • • 2,30() 

*' operations .... 20 

" inpatients 40 

Average stay in the hcspital — fifteen days. 



• ■ I ■ 



An effort was made to make the Gospel known to patients in the wards and 
out-patients, but at the close of the year no outstanding ca.ses can be pointed tofts 
having savingly accepted it. 




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MKDICAL woKK. {i'liUi IVung.) 

The medical work has heeu carried on uninterruptedly tlirougiiout the year. 
Tlie increase in tlie number of consultations, as comi)ared with last year, is j)artly 
accounted for by the fact tliat the women were treated in the men's ilispensary 
during the time the women's hospital was closed for summer holidays. Not only 
is there no abatement in the confidence of the people in our methods of treatment, 
but rather a growing confidence in us is gradually widening our sphere of 
influence. Cases of accident are now frequently brought to us at once for treat- 
ment, instead of, as used to be the rule, waiting for several days to see what tlie 
native doctor could do. Notably we have thus had the opportunity to treat two 
cases of fracture with very gratifying residts. Some whom we might expect to 
hold aloof from us and our work have come for treatment, one the son of a district 
magistrate two hiuidred miles off, came for treatment for a disease which requirt'd 
an operation under chloroform, but he submitted to the ordeal with apparently no 
fear, our local oflicial himself witnessing the operation. 

Among the many sad cases brought to us were two men in the prime of life. 
who, having been sent in their oflicial capacity to make some arrests, wiu'c taken 
into an ambush, overpowered, and both men had both ankles hacked to the bom- 
from behind, severing the large tendon and the other tissues. It was not till four 
days after they were brought to the hospital, when the horrible wounds were 
found foul and stinking and alive with maggots. One of them eventually died 
from blood i)oisoning. The wounds of the other healed gradually, but he will 
necessarily be more or less of a cripple for life. 

The work was moved into the new dispensary in June, and it is with a full 
heart we note the great improvement in our accommodation, for which we arc 
indebted to the pa-stor and people of Crescent St. Church, Montreal. 

Thanks are due to Dr. Leslie for help on many occasions. 

The medical assistants have continued to render faithful service. 

Total operations 249 

New patients 4,395 

Old patients 12,036 

Total consultations 16,43f 



H8IN CHEN STATION. {Prefecture of Wei Hui.) 




Members. — Dr. William and Mrs. Malcolm, Rev. Jas. A. and Mrs. Slimon, Rov 
Robt. A. Mitchell, Rev. W. H. Grant. 

At this station the regular Chinese morning prayers for both men and women, 
hospital and dispensary work and preaching to the patients have been carried on 
daily during the year ; while weekly prayer meeting and the Lord's Day services 
have been regularly conducted by the missionaries at the station. A new depar- 
ture has been made this year in instituting a special class, conducted daily by the 
doctor in the hospital compound, for instructing patients in elementary Gospel 
truths, and is meeting with considerable encouragement. The sacraments of 
baptism and the Lord's Supper were observed twice during the year ; the names 
of six men and two women have been added to the roll as catechumens, while 
three men who have completed their year of probation as cptechumens and suc- 
cessfully passed their examination in Christian doctrine have been admitted to 
Church membership. A station class for men met in the month of February with 
an attendance of ten. 

, A larger amount of time has beon spent by the pastors in preaching tours 
throughout the field than in any previous year. All the large cities in the district 



,i^«m-mmi 



135 



have been visited at least once during the year, and some of them several tiniss : 
the chief fairs held in the several cities were attended by some one or other of the 
pastors, and afforded u good medium for meeting the people from many parts and 
thuH spreading the Gospel by means of the spoken and printed Word. 

Preaching and selling literature to students was carried on at Wei Hui Fu 
(luring the progress of the examinations held there twice a year. 

The sale of Christian literature has been encouragingly large, and the attitude 
of the people towards us has in general been friendly, but to Qospel truth, as 
usual, sadly indifferent ; to this, however, there have been several bright excep- 
tions, of whom we expect to hear and see more from year to year. 

Mr. Mitchell spent two months' holiday at the coast, the remainder of the 
Htatr remaining inland all summer. 



MEDICAL WORK. (Hfiin Chen.) 

There has been a great falling off in treatments, both of hospital and dispen- 
.sary patients, over previous years. The cause is not so easy to ascertain. 

The harvest, we think, has been the poorest and the season the driest in 
twenty-two years, giving rise to many evil stories about the foreigners, probably 
the chief one being that the foreigners had agents going about the country 
poisoning wells. These stories were, however, more rife at a distance than in our 
own town. 

The society of the " Confederates" is also very strong this year all over the 
country, and is very much opposed to foreigners ; besides, food is very dear away 
from home. These are, no doubt, some of the reasons why the attendance has 
been comparatively small this year. 

The total number of treatments is 8,108, including 130 surgical operations. 

It is quite noticeable that with the drought there has been almost an entire 
absence of malaria in the field, although dysentry and cholera have not been 
wanting. 

The health of the station has been good except that of Mrs. Sliramon, who, 
during midsummer, suffered from a very severe attack of dysentery, from which 
she was Providentially spared to us. 

It might be said that the custom of allowing patients to give presents to the 
hospital has been stopped and now money gifts only are received. A considerable 
sum has thus been received, and we hope that as the custom becomes estab- 
lished, there will be a better showing of receipts next year. 





CHANG TE STATION. {Pfirfectvml City.) 

Members. — Mr. and Mrs. J. Goforth, Rev. J. Menzies, M.D., and Mrs. 
Meuzies, Rev. D. MacGillivray, Rev. J. Griffith, Miss M. A. Pyke, Miss Margaret 
8. Wallace, M.D. 

As another year closes and we try to sum up the results which to human sight 
seems so small, we are forcibly reminded that though we may plant and though we 
may water, yet God alone can give the increase. "Not by might nor by power 
but by My Spirit, saith the Lord of Hosts." During the eleven months which 
this report covers the Gospel has been faithfully and aggressively preached in this 
city and surrounding country, still, only twenty-six have been baptized on profes- 
sion of their faith and twenty-seven others have been accepted as catechumens. 

During the greater part of the year we enjoyed immunity from any disturbing 
rumours or any seeming hostility, but after the harvest had turned out a partial 
failure and an epidemic of cholera had swept off many people, we were blamed to 
account for the many deaths, and well-poisoning was laid to our charge. These 
.stories spread like wild-fire over the whole country. It was an anxious time for 



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136 

the C'lu'iBtiaiiM. for they were looked iipon as our ngentH in the evil work. For u 
time it l)ecttine uiisafo to Heiul men out on UmrH, then no Hooner had tlic terror of 
well-poiHoninx die<l out tiniii the eountry was aKain thrown into excitement l>y 
a loral rel)ellion. The otHcialH were very kind, and railed on us, promising pro- 
teetion, and stationing a l>ody of soldiers near the compound. We an? glad, 
however, to say that the rel»olliou was neither anti-Christian nor anti-foreign, fur 
no sooner had the leader of the rebellion heard that we were somewhat anxious 
than he sent a nicely worded letter telling us not to be afVaid and saying that no 
evil was intended us. The above causes all combined to hinder etl'ective work 
during the autumn. No men's station class was attempted and the women's 
was only attended by a few near by, the one exception was the chapel work which 
was rather helped than otherwise by outside rumours. Wo had hopeful cases 
almost every day and a great many visitors were received in our study. During 
building operations, Mr. Menzies each morning had the workmen all come to u 
(iospel service. The results were such as to encourage this kind of work. 



in some parts 
Mr. MactJilli- 
idolatrous fair 
as etl'ictive a 



Field Work-. — The whole tield has been gone over once, and 
several times, either by the foreign missionaries or native helpers, 
vray with several native brethren spent seventeen days at a great 
in the Hsi Hsien district ; it was hoped that we might find it 
preaching place as at the annual Hsun Jlsien fair. They found, however, that 
owing to the lack of inn accommodation in the vicinity of the temple, few of the 
pilgrims could be induced to listen any length of time. 

At the city of Wu An Mr. Wang, the brass founder, has been faithfully testi- 
fying. We spent thirteen days there and in a neighbouring town with encour- 
aging results. Mr. Chu, a well-to-do enquirer, has promised us the use of a large 
room near the centre of the city. The native helpers have also visited the city 
several times during the year. We have given four days to P'eng Ch'eng where 
the work seems to be growing in hopefulness, the native brethren have also been 
there several times ; the Christians have been more enthusiastic and several have 
been induced to join with them. We are strongly impressed with the advantages 
for spreading a knowledge of the Gospel from such a busy and populous centre ; a 
street chapel ought to be opened to reach the many who throng the town. At 
present the Christian's meet at Mrs. Yang's home, but outsiders cannot be taken 
there. 

The Christians at Hung Hua T'un have not made such progress, although 
Chang T'ung Te has been earnestly bearing testimony and there are indications 
that his persecuting elder brother is yielding to the truth. His neighbours too are 
more friendly disposed. Chang Tien centre gives evidence of the Holy Spirit's 
power — a year ago Li Ming, the ex-military official, had just broken with idols 
but now there are four homes from which false gods have been banished, and from 
ten to twenty men who believe. liast summer the heathen neighboui-s, alarmed 
at the ravages of the locusts, sought to appease the local diety with a theatrical. 
Li Ming went out before the theatre and publicly declared "Your gods cannot 
help you, the only true and almiglity God whom I serve can alone help us. I 
have asked Him to save my grain and He will do it.'' His faith was rewai-ded, 
for the locusts devoured the grain on every side, even to within a row of his, 
and then passed on, leaving his untouched. Mr. Li is also making an excellent 
impression on some of his relatives in other villages. Ta Han, where the work 
seemed so hopeful at the end of last year, is in the midst of the disturbed district ; 
the fear of man seems to be a snare, for no additions have been made to the list of 
inquirers. Mr. MacGillivray spent five days there and preached in eleven of the 
surrounding villages; repeated visits have also been made by the helpers. Mr. 
Ma, the leader, who was baptized this year, seems to be as earnest as ever. Ts'ai 
Yuan gives promise of reviving again since the Romish invasion has failed ; a man 
of considerable promise has recently been accepted as a catechumen from there. 
Ta Kwan Chwang continues its development and shows signs of real life ; we 
spent seven days with the Christians there, and with them preached the Gospel in 



wmm 



mmt 



I'M 

liitic of the a(ljac(>i)t villagcH. V\ve liiivo been bapti/cd and Hve have ht^eii added 
t(i tlu' list of catet-hunu'iiH In the coiirHe of tht* year, bt'Hidf.H th.;re arc sixtrt'ii 
uthei's whose time \n now up for Imptisni. 

There liave l)een several eases of persecutions against the Christians l»ut witli- 
out seriouH results. At a villaure in the T'an^ Vin district where a family had hut 
recently forsaken idolatry, threatH had been made to comj;')l payment of the cus- 
tomary theatrical dues. Two of the native brethren were sent there on the day 
of the theatrical to preach and sell books as well aH to encourage the Christians, 
hut the villagers seized and beat them, fastening their hamls behind their haeks 
uiul tied them up to trees, besides they snuisheil their table and ehairs and tore all 
their books to pie(;es. The brethren thought on the words of Jesus and rejoiced 
and said to their persecutors ''8lnce you havu't tied our tongues we will continue 
to testify.'" At sundown they were relea.sed and told to leave the place. Two 
other Christians hearing of the trouble hiiHtened to their relief during the night. 
They held their ground next day ; their Hibles were destroyed but they used their 
hymn hooks, and sung and testified. Moping that the villagerH would repent of 
tiicir unlawful acts, we sent a helper to inform them of our treaty rights and to 
explain the Gospel to them, but they would not pay any heed and continued to 
ul)use the Christians ; we iufonhed the olHcials and then the persecutors became 
alarmed ami sent representatives begging us not to press the case, they on their 
piirt promising to pay for everything <lestroyed and to live at j)eace with the 
Christians. We gladly forgave them and hope that all may turn out to the further- 
ance of the Go.spel. 

The mitive Christians have shown a commentlable readiness to give their time 
in helping us on tours and in village and street preaching. Two of them went to 
help at the Wu An fair, one hundred and fifty 11 away, at their own expense. 
The gifts of the native Christians alone were enough to pay the salary of i< native 
helper. 

Additional land has been secured and a new chapt^l and dispensary with rooms 
for patients, and a house for Dr. Menzies have all been adde<l during the year. 







woman's work. {Chang Te.) 

During the past year we as workers have had occasion many times to exclaim 
" What hope have we in such an uneiimil contest?" With all the combined 
forces of evil and custom arrayed against us, we are ever kept encouragingly 
mindful that the guarantee of our ultimate triumph rests not upon numbers, but 
rather upon our conscious union and co-operation with a risen and aggressive 
Christ. In the past month, although we have not been so fruitful in the various 
branches of our work as we had wished, still we have much reason to thank (Jod 
wherein we have seen manifested, the direct personal oi)eration of the Holy Spirit 
in the lives of a few. What during the past months we have thought defeats, we 
trust and pray will be hut the changing of the front of His army, preparatory to a 
glorious movement. 

Visitors. — The women have continued to visit the compound during the year 
and among them very many for the first time. Our busiest days were spent in 
receiving the large numbers who had come from the neiglibouring villages to the 
city on special idolatrous worship days, and those who calleil on the way from the 
" Western Hill,'' on which stands the temple erected to the'Uoddess Lao Nai Nai 
(Old Grandmotiier). It was on one of these days that many a tired old woman 
listened to the truth of the Gospel while resting before completing the third day's 
journey of one hundred and eighty li (sixty miles). 

Cluitses. — Every morning at eight o'clock worship was held with the women in 
the compound, we were frequently joined by the in-patients from the hospital, and 
by the attendants of those who were themselves unable to leave their wards. 




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138 

All who remained with uh during the day, after attending tho united nervicc 
on Halibutli mornlngH, received inMtruction at the aflernoon Kil>ie C'laHM. 

Weulcly JnHtruction haH l>evn given to iv claHH ofgirlH. 

No educationai worli among tlie daughterH of the ChridtianH haH yet been 
attempted. 

Slafion (Ham. — The Hrnt claHH watt lield for ten daynin Marcli. Again carryiiiK 
out the eHtal)iiHhed plan of Helf support, wu were pleased to record an attendant' 
of thirteen heuideH eleven children. Several other women were present but only 
for a few days. 

In April MIhh Macintosh and Miss I'yke. were privileged to hold in the village 
of Ta K wan ('hweng, the Hrst out-Htation class. A most pleasant and prodtablc 
week was spent in giving instruction to the women of that place. The averug«- 
attt^ndance for Bible class and study hours wjis fourteen. They came in contact 
with a large numi)er of heathen women by visiting at the homes of tlie ('hristians 
after study hours, many following from tho streets into those homes and others 
who calle<i at the compound where the daily instruction was given thus heard 
Christ's message of love. It was real joy to witness the earnj'stness of the members 
of the class as they freely testifled before their heathen friends, of their belief iu 
tlie living Ciod, and faith in His Son Jesus Christ. 

Owing to the unsettled state of alliiirs our third class in October was not a 
success. The women from a distance would not venture from home, fearing the 
arrival of the Lien ('hwaug Hui in the midst, others feared to remain in our com- 
pound, having heard the rumours of the proposed annihilation of the foreigners. 
This class was held for ten days with the small attendance of six women and two 
children. 

Hospital vittitat ion, — During the past year thi6 method of work has been daily 
carried on while tl»e }»atieuts continued to come. In addition to securing friend- 
ships and removing prejudiee, we have had at times among our in-patients those who 
seemed sincere in the profession they made of their faith in Christ. We liojjc 
when we are able to tour in the surrounding district, to find not a few, true to 
their convictions, testifying for Jesus. 

Much literature has been distributed among the out-patients while a numl)er 
of the more interested ones purchased our catechism. 

Twenty-five visits have l)een made by the foreigners to seven places. 

Total number of women recorded during the past eleven months was eight. 
Total number of baptisms ten. 

While Mrs. Goforth and Miss Pyke were away during the summer, the work 
was carried on l)y Mrs. Menzies and Dr. Wallace. 



luitumn, l^ 
to healtli 
Inn <li«trlc| 
the diseasi 
i|iiiu'antint| 
(lirtease wi 
luitl aside 



The ll 

Willi the ^j 
[iroinise ol 
Cliina, wl 
intelligent 
in the Km 
the printii 
tlie Hociet 
establish i 
would tra 
asked to < 
This 
the (ilcse ( 
were exiU 
liooks of N 
Diirii 
I8r),4«5(). 
interestini 
was ma<lo 
Siam wroi 
umga/ine. 
plete set < 
<'ontributi 
Aiulrew I 
ity, will 1 
the missi 



MEDICAL WORK. {Chang TV.) 



u. 



The dispensary has been open all the year and male and female patients 
received treatment. The number of treatments this year for all classes of patients 
was 8,457, and 54 operations were performed. 

During the last two or three months owing largely to the severe drought, wild 
reports regarding the foreigners were spread in every direction, and patients were 
consequently fewer, but thougli the attendance at the hospital was not large the 
work done among them was at times very gratifying. This was especially notice- 
able among the women patients, and instead of carelessness so often met with 
when the Gospel is being preached, many listened gladly and made good progress 
in study. 

During the yeai" a new chapel and dispensary have been built as also fifteen 
chien (1 chien equals 8 feet) of hospital buildings. Of these four chien are in- 
tended to be used as wards for opium smokers, for patients desirous of breaking ort" 
the opium habit. 

Little Gvacie Goforth after a long and trying illness was taken home in the 



Ba 
Rt 
A( 

A. 

Ri 
R 

Si 
H 
Ii 



t' lj ii ^mi.BJ i ygj B i i lii 



ia9 

• 

uiitiiinn, Itiit utbvr nutinberH uf the Htntion thuiiKh ill liuvc been Krucioimly rcntorud 
to lu^ulth tiguiii. Siaall-pux hiiH bt'cii and Htill Ih ruKinK in tbu city and ntdKbboiir- 
iiiK <lirttrii*tH, and many rhildrun aru Ix'iiiK carried oil Ity it. Joan MunzicH cau^bt 
tlic diH«aHi! from a niumber of tbu woiuan'H station cIuhm and for Monic wc«kH waH in 
i|Uiirantinc, but an only a few days bcCorw hIic bad bccnMUcccHMfully vaccinated, tbe 
<iiMi'u.M« waH not very HerioUB and no otberH were infected. Mr. (iolortb too wait 
liiid aside for a few weelcH with Jaundice Imt nr.ide a good recovery. 



HHAN<ilI.\I. 



Tbo Rev. Donald Mac(j>illivray ban entcre<l upon literary work in connection 
witb tbe Society for tbe DitUiHion of ('lu'istiun and General Knowledge, tbat givcH 
promise of great UMefulnesH. hast year a marvellous awakening w<is reported in 
Cltina, wbeu tens of millions were astir with new ideas which interested tbu most 
intelligent students in the land and tbe most enlightened Viceroys and Governors 
ill the Kmpire, headed by tbe Kniperor himself. The demand was so great that 
the printing presses at Shanghai could not print as many books as were wanted and 
tlic Society could not publish a sutlicieiit variety. Hence tbe Emperor decided to 
cHtabliab a Board of Translation, furnished with a large stafl' of literary men, who 
would translate the best books of tbe world into Chinese, while our Society was 
asked to co-operate in this as well as various other departments. 

This was followed by a reaction which may be called a " Reign of Terror." At 
tiie (ilcse of last year six /.ealous reformere were executed without trial and other8 
were exiled or degra<led. Tbe students of reform were afraid to be seen with 
lujuk.s of western learning in their hands. Tbat state of atFairs still continues. 

During tbe year forty-one books were translated, numbering in all editions, 
18'),4<I0. There are about thirty depots at which their books are sold and it is 
interesting to note how far the influence of the Society is felt. A grant of books 
was made for a public library in Korea. Tbe secretary of one of the Governors of 
Slum wrote, stating that he was one of their readers and sent an article for their 
inaga/inc. A Chinaman in Johannesburg, South Africa, .sent an order for a com- 
plete set of the Society's publications. Mr. MacGillivray has already made his 
contribution, and is now engaged on a translation of the " Spirit of Christ," by Dr. 
Andrew Murray. The instruction of the officials an to the true nature of Christian- 
ity, will not only suppress persecutions but will also open doors now closed against 
the missionary. • 



•i 



FINANIUAL STATEMENT. 



TREASURER OF IIONAN MISSION. 

For the Year ending Novkmher 8()th, 1S99. 

RaceiptH 

Balance on hand, December 1st, 1808 *8,287 73 

Remittances from Rev. Dr. VVanleu, Toronto $14,000 00 

Accounts for mission paid in Toronto by Dr. 

Warden 2,795 59 

Accounts for mission paid in Toronto by Dr. 

Warden, per Dr. McClure's drafts 3,57« 18 

Received from Ailsa Craig C.E.S 50 00 

Received from National Bible Society 13 24 

Sales of books, tracts, etc 66 35 

Honan Treasurer's error re salaries 123 75. 

Intere.st 69 53 

20,694 59 

*■ ^ $28,982 32 ' 



..:'r 






••■■,.1 




'■ J 




%l 



' < ,'» 






t S' 



1 



11 



140 

CV/M rFartf/ Station : Expenditure, 

Salaries of Missionaries $3,853 33 

Salary of Teacher of language IG 3(5 

" Medical Assistants 59 45 

'' Helpers 5)8 38 

'• (late-keeper 23 09 

Building wall 91 54 

Turchase of land and raising same . . . 105 81 

Touring 21 G8 

Medical sujtplies G7 03 

Station class, Chapel expenses, etc. . . 20 29 

VV'oinau's Work — Medical supplies . . HI 01 

■ Medical assistants 8 26 

Salaries of Missionaries 1,000 OQ 

Hnia (lien Station : 

Salaries of Missionaries $4,045 00 

Salary of Teacher 35 01 

Salaries of Helpers 58 41 

" Medical Assistants 48 15 

Touring 61 03 

Salary of Gate-keeper 26 52 

Medical supplies 128 94 

Station class, rent and incidentals ... 22 41 

Chang Te. Station : 

Salaries of Missionaries $4,254 43 

" Medical Assistants 48 55 

" Helpers 49 24 

" Teachers 37 15 

" Gate-keeper 26 26 

Medical supplies 70 87 

Touring 98 48 

Station class and iuuidentals 19 84 

l>r. Menzies' house 1,275 00 

Woman's Work — Salaries of Mission- 
aries 1,000 00 

Salaries of Teachers 46 46 

Touring 7 83 

General : 

Travelling expenses, Messrs. Grant 

and Hood $95 82 

Agent at Tientsin 200 00 

Courier service 71 07 

Books 28 94 

Registration and passports 23 56 

Sundries 227 32 



$4,926 23 



4,425 47 



6,934 11 



646 71 



$16,932 52 

Balance on liand at November 30th, 1899 12,049 80 



$28,982 32 



from ill 



141 



YIL— CENTRAL INDIA. 



This year will be rneraorable iu ludia, on account of the terrihlo famine, 
involving over twenty millions of people iu absolute want, and twenty millions 
more in unusual scarcity. The famine of 1897, resulted in the ingathering of many 
children, who are now under Christian iustruction. The success of the efforts then 
])ut forth cause the missionaries to be more than ever eager to fold as many of the 
lambs as can be secured. One of the providential purposes of this terrible visitation 
is thus evident, it is the silver lining to the cloud. 

The Church has sent out in all to this mission sixty-one mission workers. Of 
the men fifteen were ordained and two of these were medical missionaries. All 
were maiTied. Of the twenty-nine lady^ missionuries sont out five were fully 
(jualified doctors. Of the men six have left, three are at home on furlough, two 
are on sick leave, and six are at work in the field. Of the lady missionaries eleven 
have left the work, two married missionaries in the field, three are at home on 
sick leave, three on furlough, and ten are at work to-day. Miss Harris and the 
Messrs. Murray, Builder and Thompson have been called to higher service. 
Misses Beatty, McWilliams, Dougan and Mr. Jamieson have been obliged to retire 
from ill health. 

In all statims Venacular Schools and evangelistic work have been carried on. 
In all but Amkhut regular congregations have been orgs»nized. Medical work has 
been carried on under Dr. Woods, at IJjjain ; Dr. Oliver, atlndore ; Mr. McKellar, 
at Neemuch ; Dr. O'Hara, at Dhar. Anglo- Venacular Schools have been carried on 
at Mhow, Uj.jaiu and Neemuch ; and at Indore we have a High school, Normal 
school and the college. The famine of 1897 brought in children to Neemuch, 
Kutlam, Indove, Mhow, Dhar, and in all of these stations, various forms of 
industrial work are being carried on. 

In Ujjain Miss Jamieson has carried on her Asylum for the Blind, and Dr. 
Woods his Leper Asylum. 

Miss Sinclair has a large Boarding School for girls at Indore, with at the close 
of the year about 100 inmates, of whom the larger part are famine waifs. Mrs. 
Johory is also carrying on at Indore a Girls Industrial and Widows' Home in which 
are from fifty to sixty girls. 

At Rutlam there is the Mi.ssion Press in which are printed the native paper 
Gyan Patrika, an English paper The Indian Standard, the mission reports, etc. 

In Mhow the care of the Presbyterian soldiers devolves upon the missionai-y 
iu charge. In all the reports there is a recognition of the need of more workers to 
meet the growing oppoi'tuuities of their mission work and all speak of the great 
help the gifts from Canada have been to them in the work. 

Book stores have been started at Neemuch and Mhow, where Christian 
literature is .sold and w'here Evangelistic services are held from time to time. 

INDORK (Pop. 92,000). 



High School. — Mr. Ledingham reports 287 in the High School, with an average 
attendance of over eighty per cent., and sixteen in the College Department proper. 
He indicates the need of a stronger staff, more money, and a hostel for students for 
the better development of the work. 

Y.M.C.A. — It continues to do good work. There is a Sabbath afternoon 
class, especially for the Christian members, and a general meeting on Fridays. 

Churches. — The native church is not so prosperous as we could wish, and 

the chief Sabbath school, work has been carried on in connection with the 
college. 

Girls^ Industriaf Home. — There are fifty-five girls iu Mr. Johory's Industrial 



'i'..l i 

'^•i' 



'■■ -i 



142 • 

Home, thirty-three supported by the Famine Fund, and twenty by the congrej^a- 
tion. The girls are taught weaving, sewing, kuiting, hvce-making, etc., and get 
sale for all they make. The spiritual results of this school have been most 
encouraging, and already a number of useful workers have been developed in it. 
Great credit is due to Mr. and especially Mrs. Johory who have carried on this 
Home without salary for the past seven yaars. 

Boys^ Industrial Home. — The Boy's Industrial Home contains fifty boys who 
were brought in from the famine of 1897. All are taught some trade and tlic 
Home is in a fair way to becoming self-.supporting. Mr. and Mrs. Crossette have 
been in charge and have done excellent work. Here too a number of the boys 
have become earnest followers of Christ. 

Boarding School. — Miss Sinclair reports that four girls have given up their 
studies in Venacular, and whilst continuing their English lessons are dieting as 
teachers to the lower classes. One girl intends to try the matriculation examina- 
tion of Calcutta University this year. The Y.M.C.A. meetings are continued 
regularly by the girls and a subscription sent to the Sabbathu Leper Asylum. 

Zenanas. — Mias White has given up the Mohulla work amongst the ChristianK 
for the time being as the attendance for various causes was unsatisfactory. She 
reports thirty Zenanas in the camp and invitations to many more. The lack of 
efficient native helpers is a great drawback to the work. 

Day School. — Miss White has fifty-seven in her camp day school. This school 
has lai'gely grown out of her Zenana work. Tulisbai, one of Mrs. Johory's 
Industrial Home girls is doing good work in this school, both on Sabbath and week 
day. She has also been keeping up the Normal School lectures. 

Miss Grier reports 134 girls on the roll of her Marathi Brahman School in the 
city. The Hindu festivals which sometimes last a whole week, are a great draw- 
back to her work. Only slates and pencils are provided for the pupils. Nearly 
all buy their own books and many bring their own pencils. The staff consists of 
three Christian teachers and three non-Christian. In her Pinjari Bakal School for 
Hindu speaking girls, the average attendance is fifty-eight. She has one non-Christian 
and two Christian teachers. She says "We need more teachers and larger 
premises." Miss Grier also points out that in her three schools she has only four 
Mohammedan girls present, two of whom are very small and two are there just 
long enough to read through the first Hindi book. In the third or Mulhar Gauj 
School the attendance has been so unsatisfactory that for the last two months it has 
been closed. This was largely caused by an epidemic of small-pox. In all three 
schools the Sunday school work is carried on with an encouraging measure of 
success. Miss Grier reports that as she has no Bible woman, she has not been able 
to keep up the Zenana visiting, much to her own sorrow, except in the case of 
seven houses. 

Hospital. — Miss Oliver, in charge of the Hospital at ludore, reports the chief 
difficulty in the work has been the want of trained workers, and the difficulty of 
securing young Christian women to train as nurses. This year a training class has 
been begun. In 1899 the in-patients numbered 219, and the out-patients 5,355. A 
pleasing indication of the hospiui' vork 's that whilst in 1891 there was only one 
birth in the Hospital, in 1899 there have been twenty-three. Fees are regularly 
charged where the patients are able to pay them, but none are kept from treat- 
ment for the want of money. Few baptized converts can be reported, but, it is 
believed that many have thus been led to know Christ who.se names have not, and 
will not be entered on any earthly communion roll. 



MHOW. (Pop. 30,000.) 



U'.. - 



i 



i : 



The work about Mhow is largely of an Evangelistic character, in the Canton- 
ment and in many villages near it. Manpur, Barwai and Parlia, are the three 
out-stations connected with this centre. One Casto, in Nimar seemed very mucli 
interested in Christian truth and some of them have became Christians. 



0Pm^ 



' , . ^ ■ , . „ . 143 .' ■ 

Schools. — The High School department has been closed and only Christian 
teachers are employed in the Anglo-Venacular School. The branch school in the 
Cavalry Line for the children of the servants has continued to be encouraging. 
Some of its pupils have become associate members of the Christian Endeavour 

Society. 

Orphanage. — They have fifty boys in the orphanage in Mhow, all famine waifs. 
These go to school for two and half hours each day and spend a large part of their 
time in weaving Persian rugs, for which there seems to be a large demand and 
it is expected that this will aftbrd profitable employment to the native Christians 
also. 

Sabbath School. — In their large central Sabbath school from three to four 
hundred attend. 

Chaplaincy. — The chaplaincy has been carried on by Dr. Pmith, and latterly 
by Mr. Russell and Mr. Taylor. They have in Mhow — two mission buildings — a 
boys school and church, and a girls school, both considered satisfactory for their 
work. 

Womeii's Work. — In the women's work Miss Leyden reports that in her Mhow 
Bazaar School she has given up the use of non-Chi-istiaii teachers or calling women 
and though at first the results were dis("ouraging, the school is now as prosperous as 
ever. For several months she held a training class for the Christian workers, and 
also two classes a week for heathen women. 

Miss Weir worked in Mhow during the past five months. Ten villages have 
been regularly visited with an average of thirty people present per day. The 
Zenana work in the camp has been hindered through the harmful influence of a 
Bible woman formerly employed and found unworthy. Reliable and efficient 
workers are here also urgently needed. 

NEKMUCH. (Pop. Cantonment 15,291, OM Neemuch 6,309.) 

Jawad and Mandsaur are the only two stations where work has been opened 
up in addition to Neemuch. The Anglo-Venacular school is curried on in 
Neemuch Cantonment, and a Venacular school in Jawad and Daghana. Much 
time is given to the Evangelistic work by touring during the cold season, and from 
the station as a centre at other times. Twenty-nine have been baptized since the 
inauguration of this work. Some have gone elsewhere seeking work, some for 
otlier causes, and some have apostalized. Of the present congregation, some are in 
domestic service, some in the railway employ, but most are in the service of the 
mission as teachers, etc. The hopeless outlook in resx)ect to subsistence in native 
States is a serious obstacle to Christian work. The church services are conducted 
by the missionary assisted by the elders and the catechists. The congregation 
supports a catechist, and had gathered a sum of money for a church, but this ha.s 
l)een expended to meet the crying want of the sufferers in this famine. A silent 
change is taking place in the thought of the community regarding some funda- 
mental truths. 

WomeiVs Work. — Two small but suitable school buildings have been erected in 
old Neemuch. The orphanage for girls was started in the famine of two 
years ago and efforts are being made now to start a Women's Rescue Home. 

Medical. — Miss Dr. McKeilar complains of the difficulty of getting satisfactory 
lieipers in the medical work. She has had to train her own. One is now 
completing a course in the Medical School at Ludhiana. Last year there were 
89,000 treatments. A large number, latterly, being from the famine. Food has 
been given during the past three months to 55,913. The money for this has been 
contributed by the officers and friends in the station. 

Schools. — Miss Campbell reports that in March, 1899, Miss Landon came to 
assist her. The school in old Neemuch was so unsatisfactory that it had latterly 
to be closed. Jawad school has now fifty-nine names on the roll. The writing is 



'% 




r I 



■i ■ 

■■■ j 
'11 



t-i< > 



I? 



144 

the special feature of this school and is especially good. The Chainar school (low 
Caste leather workers) is also encouraging. Four Sunday schools are held every 
Sabbath. A meeting is held every mouth by the workers for comparing notes, 
l)rayer and plans for the next month. 

The orphanage, however, has been Miss Campbell's special care during tin- 
year, and has taken up a large part of her time and strength. Measles, chicken- 
pox, small-i)ox, all attacked the children. There are sixty-one in the orphanagi", 
and they are living in the Compound where their house is. The larger girls aikc 
care of the smaller ones and as there are only fifteen of the former, and they have 
had so much work to do, but little industrial work has been done beyotid carinj> 
for their immediate wants. The children have been specially helpful in connection 
with the feeding of the large number of famine sufferers. 

Miss Landon rei)orts in one school forty girls on the roll. In another twenty- 
two and in a third forty-three. Two of them are under good Christian teachers 
and have proveil satisfactory. The third has not been as fortunate, and has not 
succeeded as well. Miss Landon lias also undertaken Zenana work in both the 
city and the camp, and reports many interested listeners and new houses opened to 
them. Owing to the famine the hearts of the people seem to be more open to 
conviction. She has a nu)nthly mcvuing also for the workers and says "Had we 
more workers we might enlarge the Held," 



i 



RUTLAM. (Pop. 30,000.) 



t! .,{: 



The mission centre here is on a site just outside of the city where there is a 
bungalow for tlie missionaries, a Printing Press, Famine Orphanage, etc. Tlic 
special stations are Jaora, Barnagar and Khachraod. The medical work is luider 
a Bhee<l orphan, a l)()y trained by Dr. Campbell, Raralal, who reports 7.2811 
treatments, and an average attendance of fifteen at the Bible classes. But little is 
done for the educational work. One low Caste school at Jaora has succeeded 
fairly well. The famine boys and girls are taught in school regularly and also are 
taught type-setting, book-binding, carpentry, durrie weaving, niwar weaving, 
sewing, gardening, etc. 

The Press prints the Gyan Patrika, which though not yet self-supporting, is 
increiusingly a means of grace. The Indian Standard, the organ of the Presbyterian 
Church in India, is self-supporting in the sense that it pays its way except for tlic 
editing and managing. The congregation here consists of fifty-six commiuiicants. 
ninety -two baptized adherents, and thirty unbaptized adherents. 



UJJAIN. (Pop. 34,000.) 



I 



H 
M' 

11 






I' ^ 



In the city of Ujjain, near to one of the principal gi js, is a building whicli 
serves as a hospital, dispensary and church, and ueai'ly a mile outside of the city is 
a bungalow for the missionaries. This year Dr. Woods reports regarding the 
Evangelistic work, that he made much use of the magic lantern. An interestiiii; 
mo\'ement l)egan amongst the Mangs who, however, have not yet come out as 
they think they cannot subsist without Sabbath labour. A regular service is held 
in tile city, and during the tour amongst the villages. There is also an asylum 
for lepers, in which are fifteen, entirely supported liy the U.j.jain congregation, of 
whom six are Christians. Many of them are without hands and the majority havr 
no fingers so they are unable to do much work. Their whole cost last year was 
iSTo.OO. 

Three Sunday schools are carried on there. As an illustration of the good result 
of Sunday school work, last week a magistrate who had received his education in 
the rjjai'- Mission School stated to me '' I do not work on the Sabbath for I d*i 
not thi- . any one could disrespect that day." Dr. Woods speaks of the import- 
ui) ».i medical work especially in opening up the work iu the native States. The 



145 

in-patieuts this year numbered forty-four. He has treated all manner of diseases 
even those of animals. Receipts from this and sales of medicines, $106. 

They have three schools in Ujjain, one of which is an English department 
which teaches up to the third standard. In all the schools, as in the whole mis.sion, 
the Bible is regularly taught. 

DHAR. 

This is a comparatively new field but an important centre, thirty -three miles 
westof Mhow. There is a bungalow for the missionary, a hospital, a preaching 
hall and an orphanage. 

The famine of 1897 left thirty or forty orphiin children, and the Maharaja 
gave a site of twelve acres of good lantl for the erection of an orphanage. The 
funds for the erection of the building as well as the support of the orphans, are 
contributed by interested ladies in Winnipeg. 

The Gospel is preached in the bazaar, and in the surrounding villages, as well 
as in the chapel. The latter services often being conversational in character. 
Miss Dr. O'Hara who is in charge of the hospital and the work is of the character 
usual in such institutions. 

AMKH?UT. - 

Dr. Buchanan has been engaged in building operations, and every morning 
and mid-day from thirty to 100 labourers are assembled for worship. Only Christian 
masons and carpenters are employed in order that practical Christianity may be 
illustrated as well as taught. Every Sabbath there is church service as well as 
Sabbath school, in which are forty-two children. 

One cathechist visits the surrounding villages on Sabbath morning, and 
conducts Evangelistic services. The season being dry, there has been less sickness 
in the jungle than usual. 



APPENDIX. 
Canadian Presbyterian Mission High School. 

INDORE. 

The following is the report of Mr. A. P. Mitchell, Inspector of European 
Schools, Central Provinces and Central India : 

I have examined the school classes of the Canadian Presbyterian College on 
September oth and 6th, 1899, and found the attendance as follows in the p]nglisli 
department : 



Classes. 


I. 


II. 


III. 


IV. 


V. 


VI. 


VII. 


Total. 


Enrolled . 


.;^2 


23 


17 


15 


17 


8 


12 = 


124 


Present . . 


22 


19 


15 


14 


13 


7 


8 = 


98 



The attjendance averages 83 out of 101, or 82 per cent., which is very satisfac- 
tory. Numbers have considerably increased since last yeai-. 

The staff, exclusive of those engaged chiefly in College department, is as 
follows : 

Mr. W. S. John, Head Master, Rs. 100 per month, F.A.; Mr. T. H. Crossette, 
Rs. 60 per mouth, F.A.; Mr. Ras Biharilal. Rs. 40 per month, F.A.; Mr. V. G. 
Tare, Rs. 30 per month, Matd.: Mr. S. T. Pimpley, Rs. 20 per month, Matd.; Mr. 
J. Caleb, Rs. 25 per month ; Mr. R. Joshi, Rs. 20 per month ; Mr. Pannalal, Crad. 
Benares College, Rs. 35 per month, Sanskrit Pandit ; Mr. Hamid Ali Moulvi, 



146 




i f i, 



If!., ^ 
1 ''< 3 



.& 



i 



'■ ill 

' 11 , i 



Rs. 20 per month, Persian teacher ; Mr. Ramhal, Hindi Teacher, Rs. 17 per month. 
Vernacular Department: Mr. Kashi Prasad, Hindi Teacher, Rs. 12 per month ; Mr. 
Motihal, Rs. 8 per month, L. 8. Standard ; Mr. Kibe, Marathi Master, Rs. 8 per 
month ; Mr. Ahmad Husein, Urdu Master, Rh. 8 per month. 

The buildings, appointment and apparatus are as described in previous reports 
and are complete and suitable in every respect. The Gymnasium is now in good 
order and much used by the pupils. 

The financial position of the school is shown in the following table : 

Income. 

Government grant Rs. 2,400 

Fees 954 2 . . 

Mission grant 3,989 10 9 

Total Rs. 7,343 12 9 

Expenditure. 

Pay of Teachers Rs. 6,880 12 . . 

" Servants 386 6 .. 

Contingencies 76 10 9 

Total Rs. 7,343 12 9 

There is a slight falling off in the income from fees, but otherwise the figures 
call for no remarks. 

My examination was partly written and partly oral and the results are given 
below. 

On the whole the results show that the instruction fully maintains its quality. 
The physical instruction of the pupils also receives careful attention and the tone 
and discipline are good. Cricket and other manly games are played with spirit. 

The numbers and attendance in the Vernacular department are given below : 

Classes. I. II. III. IV. Total. 

Enrolled 91 33 39 . . = 163 

Present 68 24 33 .. = 125 

The attendance for the past year averaged ninety-three out of one hundred 
and six, or eighty-eight per cent. , which is excellent. 

Three of the teachers of this department appeared for the oral subjects of the 
teacher's certificate examination with the following results : 

Practical Hand- 
Namk. TeachinK- writing. Dictation. ReadinK- tiymnactic^. Drill. 

Total (oO) (30) (30) ($0) 

Jadhao 23 18 27 47 Excellent. Excellent. 

Soloman .... 35 13 25 60 " *« 

Shantwan... 20 15 22 40 " " 

These men are good practical teachers, have an impressive style and a greater 
faculty of commanding the attention of the whole class thanjis usual among native 
teachers. Object lessons were, however, given without object, and pictures and 
the use of the blackboard was practically ignored. This must be remedied by a 
careful and practical course of instruction in this important subject. 

I also inspected the Industrial School and was very pleased with the progress 
made. Its state is much the same as described last year. 

On the whole I have to congratulate the Mission on the continued satisfactory 
progress of the institutions. 

Sgd. A. P. MITCHELL, 

Inspector of Bhiropean Schools, 

Central Provinces' and Central India. 



EngUl 
Avithmetif 

The 
♦lueutly til 



Read! 
attention | 
passed ; 

This 



Real 
corrected 
Geogvapl 
very goo 

This 
neeessarj 



Rea' 

Translat 

books, C 

Thii 

reading 



Rei 
lation, ; 
graphy 
Geomei 

Til 
special 

R£ 

Exami 

style, 1 



R 

and o1 

Histoi 

A 

in wh 



« iiiJil H W PWWWI 



147 



Examination, English 1st Clans. 
Present, eighteen. Tkachkr — Madho Riio Joshi. 

English reading, English meaning, just commenced, boys newly promoted ; 
Arithmetic, sixteen passed ; Vernacular Dictation, all passed. 

Tlie promotions from the vernacular departmeiit liave just been made, conse- 
<iueutly the boys have done very little English. 

English, 2nd Standard. 
Present, nineteen boys. Teacher — Mr. J. Caleb, 

Reading, generally very fair ; Explanation, fair ; Translation, requires more 
attention ; Dictation, all passed ; Geography, very good ; Arithmetic, eighteen 
passed ; Copy books, in order. 

This class is in good order and very creditable to Mr. J. Caleb. 



English, Srd Standard. 
Present, fifteen. Teacher — S. T. Pimpley. 

Reading, good and clear, some mistakes in pronunciation, should be carefully 
corrected ; Explanation, fairly good ; Grammar, ten passed ; Translation, good ; 
Geography, all passed ; Arithmetic, twelve passed ; Copy, in order ; Drawing, 
very good. 

This cla.ss is as usual, well taught, by Mr. Pimpley. A new map of Asia is 
necessary, Mr, Pimpley passed in teaching power, reading and writing. 

4th Standard. 
Present, fourteen boys. Teacher — Mr. K. G, Tare, 

Reading, fair ; Explanation, fair ; Grammar, generally fair, three failed ; 
Translation, good ; Dictation, all passed ; Arithmetic, twelve passi^d ; Exercise 
books, Copy, Drawing, in order. 

This class is creditable to Mr, Tare. Mr. Tare passed in pi-actical teaching, 
reading and writing. 

5th Statidard. - 

Present, thirteen. Teacher — Mr, Ras Beharilal. 

Reading, genei'ally fair; Explanation, Grammar, good; Translation, Re-trans- 
lation, all passed ; Recitation, indifferent, two passed ; Dictation, all passed ; Geo- 
graphy, fair, ten passed ; Arithmetic, twelve passed ; Algebra, twelve i)assed ; 
Geometry, twelve passed ; Copy and Exerciso books, in order , Drawing, fair. 

This class is in fair order, but" recitation is very badly taught and must receive 
special attention, 

Ras Beharilil was examined in practical teaching for teacher's certificate. 
Examination : Reading, fairly good ; Writing, good ; Practical teaching, not good 
style, but poorly passed, 

6th Standard. 
Present, seven. Teacher — Mr, T, H, Crossette, 

Reading, etc, the three top boys read with great intelligence and expression, 
and others are indifferent ; Explanation, all passed ; Mathematics, all pa.ssed ; 
History and Geography, all passed. 

All these boys have passed the Central Provincial Middle School examination 
in which the results were very creditable. 

t ' 



148 

7th Standard. 

I'resent, seven. 

Reading, etc., very fair, a very difficult course. 

None passed the matriculation examination last year. I trust the result will 
be better this year. 




I 




STATISTICS I.-CHUKCH AND SABBATH SCHOOL. 

N.B.— These statistics are for 12 months, ending Feb. 28th, 1900, whereas the body of the Report 
is for 10 months, ending Dec. 31st, 1899. 



Station 



Mbow 

Indore 

Ujjain 

Rutlam J 

Neemuch 

Dhar 

Amlchut, Alirajpur. 



e 

B 

S 

E 
o 



105 
13 
.50 
31 
32 
10 



3C 


B 


Baptmi' 


Orphans 


4) 
1 


S 


°^ 


Boys' 8 


.8. 


Oi 


rls' 8. 8. 


t 


'jSi 










■o-o 

ce 


1| 

r 

s 


4J 

i 

e 


1 

>5 


1 


T 

tm 

5 




i 


— o 

II 




1 
1 


il 

a, a. 




^1 


9) 

I* 


PQ 


iJ 


o 








J 


■■J 






«<< 






« 




41 


32 


. 


55 




.•» 


3 


4 


1 


13 


341 


2 


4 


m 


m 


123 


11 


4 


«2 


104 


112 








13 


IHo 




19 


\m 


28 


31 


2 


1 


17 


18 


15 


, 






3 


105 




3 


Kl 


7fi 


60 


18 


< 


82 


55f 


47 


1 


7 


8 


9 


122 


2 


3 


78 


19 


15 


10 




24 


77 




2 


10 


5 


7 


220 


."S 


7 


22fi 


m 


12 


19 


2 


45 


8 


31 


1 




5 


7 


12H 


5 


4 


48 


15 




'■ 


1 








•■ 






1 


3 


42 


•• 







* Besides Communicants. 



t Including won^n, 



S See note on page 68. In addition one communicant (with her baptized child) has been trans- 
ferred to Uijain church, and two baptized adherents died. On the other hand, the numbers of 
orphans and unbaptized adherents have been greatly increased. 







iiiW 



STATISTICS II.-EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 



N.B.— These statistics are for 12 months, ending Feb. 
is for 10 months, ending Dec. Slst, 1899. 



28th, 1900, whereas the body of the Report 





Primary Scliools 


An 
or 


Klo-VernaculHr 
\liddle Schools 




High School 


College 
Teachers 








E 

p 


Teachers 


11 


1 
S 

z; 


Teachers 

= .2 

X ■ ;."-S 

.C o 

« ^1 


*< 


S 


Teachers 


Si o 
g « 

"5 


J? cS 


Station 


1 


X 

h 


c 
« 

JS 

O 


.2 

o 




lilhow 


1 


1 




.32 


1 


i 
6 i 


79 


i 
1 










i 


IndorB 


" i - 






8 


10 


*192 


3 


Uljain 


2 
3 
2 
3 


1 
3 
3 
2 


1 
...... 

3 


38 

58 

74 

ISO 


' 


6 4 


46 










Dhar 














3 


niit.lAm 





















3 




1 


3 3 


53 
















Amkhut 










t 





































From Primary to B.A. 



149 



STATISTICS I1I.--MED1CAL WORK. 
a) Moos. 

N.B.— These statistics arc for 15 months, ending Keb. 28th, lOOti, whereas the body of the Report 
for 10 months, ending Dec. 31st, 1809. 





1) 

£5 




£ c 


H 


5* t? 




<)< 


1 


(K) 


* 


;«« 


J 


Ki 


J 


78 


/ 


22(5 


1 


48 





1 

n 






Oui-Patients 


Visits |Oper'ns|| 




Station 


Dispensary 
III Patients 


New 

Cases 


Treat- 
ments 

8,080 
11,198 


IS 


.S 




1 


Minor 

Average Num 
at Service 


Missionary in Charge. 


Ruttfiiii 








2,»il 
4,359 




! 


77 ; 15 
152 1 ;« 


J. F. CamDbcU, D.D. 


Ujjaiu 


1 


1 


44 






» 


C. R. VVoods,M.i).,C.M. 


Ani)(hut 






.1. Buchanan. B. A., M.D. 

























Indore — 

Dhar 

Neemuch. 



* Including Women and Children. 



(6) Women's. 



219 I 5,255 
275 8,442 
3,700 



1.5,282 , 30fi 1 63 171 4(» 

20,3«l 28fi , '.... ....lAll 

13,512 j 904 1 1.. .......... 



M. Oliver. M.D. 
M. O Hara, M.D. 
Miso McKellar. 



STATISTICS IV.-ZKNAN A WORK AND GIRLS' SCHOOLS. 

N.B.— These statistics are for 12 months, ending Feb. 28ih, 1900, whereas the body of the Report is 
for 10 months, ending Dec. 3l8t, 1899. 









Houses Regularly 
Visited 


Houses Irregular- 
ly Visited 


Girls' 


Schools 


Bo«rd'g School 




la 

Missionaries ' 

f 


Tc.ohers 


Average 
Attendance 


Teachers 


8 

v 


STATldN 


No. 


1 




Non-Chris- 
tian 


5 

X 

.s 


1 

■u 
w A 




Mhow -[ 

Indore \ 


Miss Lievdeii 


i 














Miss Weir 




12 


3 


2 


8 

1 
6 

1 

1 




89 








MissSinciair .... 







3 


1 


62 


Miss White 






1 
3 

2 

1 


■■3' 


40 
180 

27 

15 




Miss Grier 




1 






Ujjain 


Miss Jsmieson — 
MissO'Hara, M.D 

Vliss Campbell... 


1 
2 


12 
20 


3 


31 


Dhar 




Rutlam 








Neemuch 


2 




50 


(i 


8 


1 


210 
























I •■ fj 



in 


1.: 


I ' ■ 




li ; 








M . : 






: 


M . 


■ 


\\ . 
t '■ 


* 



■:i4 

■ 1%, tS 









150 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

TREASURER CENTRAL INDIA MISSION. 
^OR THE Year ending Fehuuary 28th, 1900. 

Receipts. 

Balance ou hand, March Ist, 1899 $1,102 28 

Received from Rev. Dr. Warden, Toronto $36,500 00 

Paid in Toronto on account of Mission by Rev. 

Dr. Warden i,907 94 

Refunds on Home travelling 304 84 

Government Grant High School, Indore 791 8(5 

Rent 41 24 

Special donations per missionaries 254 2() 

Chaplaincy receipts 353 18 

Fees and sales 1,281.03 

Interest 16 20 

Balance still unpaid 986 67 

42,437 22 

$43,539 50 

Expenditure. 
Men's Work: 

Evangelistic $4,474 42 

Educati' lal 4,803 22 

Medical 1,033 50 

Miscellaneous 69 73 

Home travelling 2,676 02 

Bhil building 1,096 46 

Dhar Preaching Hall 73 60 

Treasurer's expenses 152 72 

Missionaries' salaries 12,637 21 

$27,016 88 • 

Women's Work : 

Evangelistic $1,728 81 

Educational 2,503 75 

Medical 2,742 84 

Miscellaneous 237 40 

Home travelling 203 80 

Treasurer's expenses (in part) . . . 152 71 • . 

Women's Hospit 1, Dhar 181 44 

Women's Bungalow, Ujjain 74 42 

Freight on boxes from Canada. . . 26 85 

Missionaries' salaries 8,210 18 

$16,062 20 

Balance due from last year, both Men's and 

Women's work 374 69 

Cash on hand, March Ist, 1900 85 73 

$43,539 50 



'ti^s^m m 



151 



VIII— MISSION TO THE CHINESE IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Bright hopes were blighted by the organization of a new Rociety amongHt the 
Chineae, called the "Emperor Protective Hociety." It spread like wildlire over 
the continent, reaching every coterie of Chinese, and inflaming their enthuHiasm for 
the restoration of the Chinese Emperor and the introduction of sweeping reforms 
in China, as well as restoring Confucianism and ancestral worship to its supremacy 
aH the religion of the Empire. The society has made a radical departure from 
Chinese custom, in holding meetings every Sabbath Day in halls with pulpit and 
platform, with patriotic songs and addresses. The effect has been a smaller 
attendance at Gospel services on the Sabbath Day. The evening schools, however, 
have increased in attendance. 

1. Schools. — Victoria. School was held on 248 evenings. 

Total attendance 11,812 

Average per night 47 

Vancouver. — Total attendance, 6,905. An average of 28 on 244 evenings. 

2. Sabbath Services. — When weather allowed, open air services were held both 
ut Victoria and at Vancouver — at the former place afternoon and evening. Num- 
licrs hearing the Word on the street would vary from a .score to two hundred. 



Victoria. — (a) Sabbath School average attendance 16 

•' " evening service " *' 20 

Vancouver " School " •* 9 

♦• " evening service " •♦ 18 



3. Baptisms. — February 12th, 1899, baptized 2 at Vancouver. 
Decemb'r 10th, 1899, " 2 at Victoria. 
January 14th, 1900,' " 2 at Vancouver. 



4. Contributions: — 



(a) 1st Presbyterian Chinese Church — membership, 13. 

' For the Schemes of the Church $56 00 

Synod and Presbytery Funds 3 00 

Educating Ma Seung at Canton College and other 

philanthropic and religious works 235 00 

(6) The Vancouver Mission cont'd for mission expenses $55 40 

" Ma Seung 25 00 

For other religious and philanthropic work 32 25 



$294 00 



-$112 65 



(c) The Christian Endeavour Societies of St. Andrew's First Presbyterian and 
Mount Pleasant Churches, Vancouver, contributed $105 for the support 
of the Mission. 





1 


; 


li 


' 





•■& 



152 

((/) Th»' VVoiiiiui'h MisHidiiiiry Hociety. of Nflnon, iiihI |H'ivii(i» parties hiiv«' ii( 
(lillcrnit times tlirou^li tlie year coiitribiited voltiiitariiy, ami extra tn 
their rt>>;iilar euiitril)utioiis for special itinerary and eolportage wmk 
witliin tlie Itoiuxis. The contributions cannot well he noted here, iml 
have iuH-n reported lo our (;hurch's agent ut Toronto. 

Ti. Citiint'iit'H ami Ifiiii'rary, — Our usual work ninon^ tlu' (Miiuese at the ciinn(>ric> 
ou the Krascr River was continued last siuisoii. Sonic friends in Stevcstou, wliidi 
is the ;;reat center, rented a JapancHc boat buihler's hoUHU as a residence for uur 
missionaries. The front part we utilized as a reading room for while lishernu-ii 
ttud others. Our kitchen and dornntory were in the seamy lean-too in the n-ar. 
Among the Chinese Wi* found kindly recognitions and a readiness to hear our nies- 
Hage on the part of the nuijority. We always m -et with sonu' who are opposed or 
who refuse to hear, but very few who do not treat tis with reaHonal)le respect. 
Sonu' seemed to be not far from the Kingdom and very sympathetic towards the 
truth, Itut none at thecuiniK^ries professed to '' repent and believe " us the result wf 
our preaching and visiting there. 

In Se|ttember, Mr. Ng and Mr. Winchester visited the Kootenays ami O'Kana- 
gan Valley. At Vernon. Revelstoke, Nakusp, Nelson, Trail and Hossland, \vc 
l)reacheil in stores, laundries or wherever opportunity ottered. 

.Mr. Winchester writes : — "Two or three Heemed to turn from their idoU t*» 
serve the living (Jod as a result of our visit, but formal i)role,ssion of faith is a dilli- 
cult task. I'ublic opinion is very strong where independence of thought has neve'' 
been known. Xo inconsiderable part of our work is the slow and invisilile proces 
of iiiMueiicing iiulividual conviction, and through units gradually changing collective 
sentiment. The sentiments of the Chinese are changing, and many in China to-day 
•who formerly resided in Canada are more accessible to the missionary than thcv 
could have l»cen without their experience in some mission in this country. Thcic 
are six of our cliurch members in China uow, and many others who, although not 
church mcmlu'rs, believe the Scriptures to be true, and in some cases, a.s mission- 
aries in Canton report, districts in China have been opened by their influence." 

(). LvjiiTx. — Only one visit was made to theLepe'son J)arcy Island in 1S!(!». 
The ditHculties and expense attending such visits, thoug.. constituting a not incon- 
siderable hindrancie, are still less serious than the time. One who died in 1895* was 
for some time i>retending to be or was symi)athetic with the truth, but afterwards 
very energ<'tically told the missionary that he had done what he told him— had 
repente(i of liis sins, believed in the Lord Jesus, and i)rayed to God that he might 
be made whole, and notwitkstanding this he said, '*I have got worse and worse and 
am nearly dead. Your Je.sus doesn't hear or doesn't care or isn't able t(» help iiic 
when I i)ray to Him ; therefore I don't want to hear any more about Him.", How- 
ever, at the next visit he was much hiunbled and penitent, and at the last visit he 
was more mellowed, and after some tender conversation with him, the poor fellow"> 
face swollen and pitted and black beyond all resemblance to the human counten- 
ance, with great emotion said, " Pastor, T do believe in .Jesus and pray to Him." 
"N'ery soon after that he was not. None of the others seemed to maniiest the slight- 
est interest in the messivge. One would not listen to us at all. Poor souls ! 



i-i \\ 



7. rnion Mine.-<. — There is no more perplexing problem than that presented l)y 
the i)eculiar conditions obtaining at Union Mines, Provincial legislation i)rohibit- 
ing the Chinese from working underground, though contested by the Union Colliery 
Co., had the effect of almost depopulating the Chinese town at the mines. Two or 
three hundred renmined out of a former population of fourteen hundred. Some of 
tho.se who remained did so because they could not do otherwise. The Provincial 
Act having been disallowed by the Dominion Government, the Colliery Company 
re-engaged large numbers of Chinese for underground work. Work was just 



168 

t 

nict'ly comnu'iu'iMl wlioii tlii> Provincial (iovcrninmt to«»k ii ii«>\v incthtHi ornccoiii- 
pli«hlnK their object, /.*'., by jtrohiltitiiiK uil from working mulcr^jround who are 
iiiiuble to ri'tul the iniiicii rt'giilatioiiH and undcrHtand ord(>r>4 given in the Knglinh 
iangnage. Our mlHHion and school at Tnion in atlected by thoHe things in the f'oU 
lowing ways : — 

(ii) A school haw been organized either by the Colliery ('(unimny or the Chin- 
ese merchants, or both, with the intention of enaliling many of the Chinese to 
"qualify " under the new regulations. A certain sum is kept back — about f:( — 
each month from the wages of the Chinese for the stijijiort of tlu- school. Som<' of 
the men have told Mr. Hall that tiiey were dissuaded t'rom attending uur Mission 
for reasons which we have not been able to discover. 

{!)) The Chinese who <rame in to take the places of those who left over a year 
iijjo are chletly fresh arrivals from China ; so that the long and indispensible pre- 
paratory work done in and on behalf of those whom we were able to reach and 
iiiMuence of the former population, must be patiently commenced and continued 
for the newcomers. Such sub-.structure building is of necessity without "observ- 
ation," but is it therefore without value? 

8. Voluntary trachrrH. — By none is the cordial thanks of the Church more 
merited than by those wht> so faithfully, and absolutely without any human reward 
except the gratitude of the missionaries, continue the work of teaching in our 
evening schools at Victoria and Vancouver. But for their valued aid a most im- 
portant evangelizing agency would be much limited in its scope and influence. 
Some teachers have been very conscientious and liberal in their servi«'es. But 
whilst with gratitude we praise the teachers v ho assist us, with regret we note 
that the burden falls upon a comparative few. Some of our Chine.se Christians 
who are desirous of obtaining a further knowledge of our language have no op- 
portunity of getting a le8.son. If they are able to teach the alphabet they are 
drafted into service because of the scarcity of Christian teachers from among our 
own people. Some two or three of our (Christians have gone elsewhere to receive 
instruction iu English because they could get no help in our own mission. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



CHINESE IN BKITISH COLUMBIA. 
For the Year ENi)iN(i April 'M)t\i, 1S)0(). 

Receipts. 

Received from Rev. Dr. Warden. Toronto !?8,9()S 70 

Received for pulpit sujtply (Rev. A. B. Win- 
chester) M '2U 

*«,!t72 90 

Krpendittire. 

Salaries $3,280 00 

Rent of buildings 510 00 

Travelling expenses 81 70 

Light, heat, etc 54 82 

Balance, to Toronto 4(; .S8 

$;?,972 90 



'^ -r '•'^wm 


■■' *:i' ' 


1 




':i| 


T>'f 


.'': 


'il' 



154 



Si- 



IX.— INDIANS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



iff: • 



There are on the west coast of Vancouver Island, seven tribes of Indians witli 
about 900 Indians in all. 

There are four schools with an enrollment of 165 and an average attendance 
of 63. 

The chief discouragements are : (1) The fishing industry and con.sequeiit 
absence from church and school. (2) The potlatches, which are wasteful feasts lead- 
ing to poverty. (3) Gambling and drink often encouraged by seamen, who have 
their own ends to serve. 

Notwithstanding these there is a general improvement — houses are better and 
cleaner, degrading customs are disappearing and some are enquiring as. to the way 

Council. — The missionaries on the coast meet at intervals for consultation and 
mutual help. Workers who are isolated so much of the time, are greatly cheered 
and refreshed by a day or two of conference upon methods of work and different 
aspects of spiritual life. 



ALBEENI. 



ly ; 




Industrial Home. — There are two Indian tribes beside the village, about 200 in 
all. The expectation of the Committee was that the Home would accommodate 
children from all the tribes in Barclay Sound. That expectation is now beginning 
to be realized. There are at present twenty-eight children in the Home, nineteen 
boys and nine girls. Of these some are from the coast tribes. 

Mr. J. R. Motion and Mrs. Motion, who have had experience in the Regina 
School are now in charge, and are devoted to the work. Mr. Motion is giving 
more attention to industrial work than was possible hitherto. The boys show a 
liking for carpentry and do creditable work. The day school is in charge of Mrs. 
K. Cameron who is an experienced and efficient teacher. All the children in tlie 
Home as well as some day pupils attend the school. 

The Government has now agreed to give the Home a Boarding School grant, 
viz., $72 per pupil, for 25 pupils. 



BARCLAY SOUND. 

Ucluelet children on roll 37 

Ahousaht " '' 42 

Dodger's Cove ' ' 26 



Mr. Swartout itinerates, seeking to follow the Bands with his message in their 
migratures. 

School work for the past year has been carried on ander increasing difficulties. 
More tliau usual have the Indians been absent, sealing and fishing, it being very 
difficult to secure regularity at school. Tlie larger boys go sealing and all move 
with their parents to the various fishing stations. Sometimes the attendance at 
school is large, and then news arriving that the salmon are running, or there are 
plenty of halibut or dog-fish to be got at a certain point, there is a sudden flitting, 
and school sutlers. 



vmsimmmm m 



155 



Potlatches also, both at the stations, villages and the other tribes, have inter- 
fered with school work. 

Ucluelet has suffered more from these disturbing elements than ordinarily, 
and as a result, not only has the average attendance been reducad, but school 
has had to be closed for eight weeks ; whilst at Ohiaht, though school has been 
kept open, the work has suffered. 

At the latter station building operations, carried on principally by the teacher 
has also hampered the work. 

And yet there is reason for encouragement in the progress made by the child- 
ren and the interest manifested by many of the parents. It is also encouraging to 
note a growing disposition to take advantage of the Industrial Home at Alberni, 
three from the Ucluelet school, two from the Ohiaht, besides three otliers who 
were not on the books of either school, having been received. 

Itinerating. — The causes operating against school work demand that more 
attention be given to itinerating. With Indians scattered in small bands over a 
large territory, it is necessary, if they be reached with any degree of regularity, to 
go to them. 

This would be comparatively easy if they were land Indians, but living 
on islands or small clearances on the shores of the mainland, they can only 
be reached by water, necessitating travelling by boat, at best an uncertain and 
often a dangerous method. Even in ordinary weather, quick pa.ssages must be made 
to avoid storms and save time, while in the stormy season unless a journey is very 
(juickly made there may be serious delays. 

This department of work will be much facilitated when a launch is secured, 
and we take this opportunity of thanking those friends who have sent contributions 
for this purpose. 

Liquor drinking and gambling have decreased at Ucluelet during the year, for 
which we are thankful ; whilst at Ohiaht, with the exception of a few outbreaks 
of these vices, they have almost disappeared. 

To attain this, however, smuggling has to be prevented, and in this the mis- 
.sionaries must sometimes take an active interest, resulting of course in antagonism 
on the part of the culprits, who seek to exonerate themselves at the expense of the 
reputation of the missionary. 

Evangelistic work has been carried on as usual. Sabbath schools and preach- 
ing services have been conducted regularly at each point, in the native language 
or in " Chinook," each member of the staff taking a share in thi.-: work. 

Whilst on the whole, the Indians show little desire for Christianity, yet ser- 
vices are well attended, especially at Ohiaht, and the interest manifested by some 
is very encouraging. It is, indeed, quite evident that not a few have a knowledge 
of the truth, which is gradually leavening their lives, and the name "Christian" 
is recognized among thera as a symbol of a righteous character. 

At Ucluelet the whites also have frequently gathered on Sabbath evenings to a 
service in English. 

Inquirers. — There has been a weeding out during the year. The unstable have 
gone back to their former ways, but the true remain. 

There is particular encouragement in the increasing interest displayed by some 
of the old people, three or four of whom, give evidence of a sincere desire for the 
l)etter life, wliilst we are not without hope that others among them are disposed to 
follow. 

We have striven to faithfully sow the seed ; the results are in the hands of 
Him who gave us our commission. We earnestly request the sympathetic interest 
of all God's children by whose intercession the work may be much strengthened. 



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156 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



MISSION TO INDIANS, BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Foa THE Year ending April 30th, 1900. 

I. — West Coast. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, May 1st, 1899 *? 06 

Received from Rev. Dr. Warden, Toronto 2,795 00 

Expenditure. 

Salaries $2,305 00 

Rent 43 00 

Travelling expenses 22 81 

Building two school nouses 400 00 

Interest 17 55 

Balance on hand, April 30th, 1900 . 14 70 



$2,803 06 



$2,803 06 



II. — Alberni. 

Receipts. 

Received from Rev. Dr. Warden, Toronto $2,632 29 

Columba Sabbath School, Victoria 2 30 

Sales of stock, etc 85 00 

Balance due April 30th, 1900 (since paid) 141 98 

Expenditure. 

Miss Johnston's salary and expenses $289 50 

Mr. and Mrs. Motion, salary and expenses 517 40 

Mrs. Cameron, salaiy (in part) 95 00 

Out door assistant 161 25 

Repairs 200 00 

Maintenance 1,598 42 



$2,861 57 



$2,861 57 



157 



X.— CHINESE IN ONTARIO AND QUEBEC. 



The Rev. J. C. Thomson, M.D., rei)orts the work among the Chinese of 
Montreal as progressing favourably. 



SCHOOLS. 



There are now eignteeu schools in operation —sixteen Sabbath Schools and 
two v.eek-night schools. Provision is thus made for teaching the Chinese every 
day in the year. The attendance varies according to locality : the lowest average 
attendance in any school is seven, and the highest is sixty -three. This work 
might be enlarged were it possible to secure a larger staff of teachers. The men 
are anxious to be taught ; they provide books and other school requirements and 
contribute freely for the support of the work. Miss Woodington resigned her 
position as teacher of the week -night school last spring, and Miss Annie McCaul 
has filled the position since then with satisfaction to the Committee. 



'■:-:h. 



C. E. SOCIETY. 

A Christian Endeavour Society was formed recently and is doing excellent 
work. The meetings are conducted by the Chinamen themselves, and will b? 
found very helpful in developing Christian life and ability for service. The mem- 
bership is now about twenty-five and !;he attendance has reached as high as sixty. 



CHINESE SERVICE. 

Dr. Thomson continues to conduct divine service in the Chinese language 
every Sabbath evening. These meetings are well-sustained and several men have 
passed from them into the full commuLiion of the Church, 



THE NATIVE ASSISTANT. 

The native assistant, Chin Now Seng, has rendered efficient service in visita- 
tiori, in preaching and in general helpfulness. He is fluent in speech, his manner 
is devout and his influence among the men is good. 



CHINATOWN. 



The evils associated with that part of our city known as " Chinatown " have 
been felt during the year. The police authorities have interfered more than once. 
Several arrests were made and flues imposed. The result of thi.' interference on 






tei 



, 15« 

the part of the civic authorities has beeu beneficial. The evils complained of have 
been considerably checked, and several badly-disposed persons have been shorn of 
tlieir power. For this better state of things special credit is due to Chief Detective 
Carpenter. 



FESTIVALS. 




The holding of large festivals, to which are invited all the Chinese scholars of 
the city, and their teachers, is still an essential part of our work. Several sucli 
have been recently held. One was to commemorate the fifteenth anniversary of tlio 
commencement of Chinese mission work in Montreal, as well as the fifth anni- 
versary of Dr. Thomson's connection witli the work. It was a large and repres- 
entative givthering and addresses were delivered by many leading ministers and 
Christian workers of our city. Otiiers were held to celebrate the Chinese New- 
Year. One purpose of these gatherings is to keep the men from dangerous 
influences during the festival s^-.;-ou. It is always sought to give a distinctively 
Christian character to these gatherings, and we believe that the influences are 
good. • 



AVOEK IN OTHER PLACES. 

While Dr. Thomson spends most of his time in Montreal he does not neglect 
the needs of the Mission in other places. He travels westward from time to time. 
and organizes the work in such centres as Ottawa, Toronto, etc. The work in 
Toronto is especially encouraging. He also does a great deal through corres- 
pondence to keep up an interest in the work and to help those who are trying to 
teach the Chinese in towns and villages. 



THANKS. 



r'i ■'■■ ^." 

I'M' 




Our grateful thanks are due to the congregations who contribute towards the 
support of this work, to the Protestant School Board for the payment of the salary 
of the teacher of the night school for a part of the year, and to Mr. David Yule for 
a generous subscription. We would also acknowledge the excellent work done by 
our faithful superintendents and their loyal teachers. 

We recommend as follows : 

1. That, in view of our large missionary interests in the Chinese at home and 
abroad, the General Assembly's Foreign Mission Committee be requested to urge 
upon all our congregations, within whose bounds Chinamen are found, to endeavour 
at once to bring them under Gospel influences, that they may be helped and 
be made a blessing to the millions to whom they are sure to return. 







2. That, in view of Canada's increasingly important commercial and sociiil 
relations with that great empire, and the critical state of affairs there at present, 
we urge upon our Governmental authorities not to embarrass those relations by 
raising the capitation tax from $50 to $500, as now proposed, and which we cannot 
believe to be in accord with British justice or the Golden Rule. 



w.><iiujiK|.L.ttJtWil 



159 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1. The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society (W.D.) reports increase over the 
previous year, as is seen by the following : 

Presbyterial Societies 27 

New Auxiliaries 23 

New Mission Bands 23 

Auxiliaries unreported or disbanded 9 

Mission Bands, unreported or disbanded 19 

Total number of Auxiliaries 656 

Total number of Mission Bands 306 

Auxiliary Membership 10,166 

Mission Band membership 7,447 

Yearly members of General Society 3,492 

Life members added during year 84 

Total number of life members since organization of 

Society 1,186 

o ii J TT 1 f Number 1,306 

Scattered Helpers | Contributions , $984 51 

Contributions from all sources $46,331 47 

2. The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society (E.D.), has had a prosperous 
year, the total amount of receipts being $10,582.50. 



GENERAL. 

3. The following appointments have been made: — Rev. J. R. Harcourt, B.A., 
to Honan ; Miss Mary E. Leach, Miss Eliz. MacLennan, B.A., and Miss Susie 
McCalla, M.D.. to Central India; Miss J. McNeil to Ahousaht, B.C., and Miss 
Cary A. Gunn to Victoria, B.C., to labour amongst the Chinese. 

4. The Presbytery of Honan has recommended that Hsin Chen should be 
abandoned as a central station and property purchased at Wei Hui Fu, which city 
has a large population and is as well a student and commercial centre. There, 
also, officials reside and disturbers of the peace can be more readily suppressed. 
The Committee has agreed to this recommendation of the Presbyteiy of Honan. 

Respectfully submitted, 



WM. MOORE, ] Joint 

ALEX. FALCONER, [ Conveiwr». 






t 



160 




II 




FOREIGN MISSION FUND, 1899-1900. 

« 

EASTERN SECTION. 
Rev. E. a. McCurdy, Halifax, Acting Tkeasurek. 

Ackuowledged in " Record " $2S,437 02 

Balance due Treiisurer, April lat, 1900 571 48 

Expeitdiliire. 

Balance due Treasurer, April Ist, 1899 *2,138 26 

*0n accounts of New Hebrides 6,008 70 

*0n acccunt of Demcrara, Trinidad and St. Lucia 19,923 21 

Remitted Dr. Warden 59 87 

Expenses of Committee 42 14 

Printing, etc 129 61 

Interest — 

To Mrs. T. p. Jones *83 63 

To Woman's Foreign Mission Society 1.38 71 

-227 34 

Proportion of Agent's Salary and General Expenses 479 37 

KOREAN MISSION FUND. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, April Isc, 1899 !j!2,638 52 

Acknowledged in " Record " 3,016 63 

Expenditure. 

•Salaries for three Missionaries !ii!2,853 72 

Language Teachers, Itinerating Expenses and Hou.se Rent 567 94 

Proportion of Agent's Salary and General Expenses 150 99 

Balance on hand, April 1st, 1900 2,082 50 

*For particulars see Foreign Mission Report. 



WESTERN SECTION. 

Rev. Robt. H. Warden, D.D., Tokonto, Treasurer. 

Receipts. 

Balance at Cr., April lat, 1399 $656 65 

Contributions from congregations 34,46<< 51 

•• " Sabbath Schools .3,.%7 55 

*•• " C. E. Societies 1,609 02 

Donations from individual friends 4,403 43 

Interest l,52v) 13 

Glengarry Presbytery, ac. Rev. A. P. Ledingham's salary 971 00 

Glengarry S. S. Association 440 00 

Knox College Alumni, ac. Rev. J. Goforth's salary 691 13 

Queen's College Students' Missionary Association 160 00 

Toronto Central Church, ac. Rev. N. H. Russell's salary 800 00 

Toronto, St. James' Square, ac. Rev. D. MacGillivray's salary 500 24 

Toronto, Knox Church, special, per Rev. Dr. Parsons 1,257 57 

Montreal, Crescent St. Church, Dr. McClure's salary 1.200 00 

" Erskine Church, Dr. P. C. Leslie's salary, etc 1, lOO 00 

Nai»-n and Beech wood, ac. Rev. J. A. Slimmon's salary 479 10 

M' David Yuile, Montreal, Rev. M. MacKenzie's salary 1,200 00 

Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, Toronto 47,704 64 

" " " Montreal 500 00 

Late Mrs. N. McTavish, S. Mountain 100 00 

Late Robt. Irwin, Vaughan . . 50 00 

Transferred from Mrs. Goforth Trust Fund 2,866 97 

Transferred from Foreign Mission Special Fund 11,085 26 



.$29,008 50 



$29,008 .')0 



$5,655 15 



$5,655 15 



$117,118:20 



161 



DinbHvuementii. 

Central Indii4 f45,22(» 66 

Rev. D. MacGillivray, Shanghai, China 

Honan, China 

Formosa, Japan 

North- West Indians 

British Columbia Indians 

Chinese in British Columbia 

Chinese in Montreal 

Salary of Secretary 

Expenses of Committee 

Printing, including annual report, minutes, etc 

Interest on advances 

Travelling expenses, Missionaries to fields 

Travelling expenses. Missionaries in Canada . . 

Medical fees and legal expenses 

Annuity 

Proportion of expenses. Committee on Y. P. Societies 

Woman's Foreign Mission Society, from Schreiber, N.B. . 

Taxes, etc. , Prince Albert .... 

Proportion of general expenses 

Balance at Cr., April let, 1900 



390 00 


20,325 47 


9,620 49 


24,065 00 


5,427 29 


.'3,908 70 


1,887 50 


2,000 00 


456 21 


506 59 


676 64 


461 78 


411 62 


43 00 


8 00 


50 00 


15 00 


153 14 


1,200 00 


283 21 



$117,118 20 



FOREIGN MISSION SPECIAL FUND. 

Receipts. 

Balance at Cr., April 1st, 1899 $30,000 00 

Bequest, Alexander McCaa, Egmondville 50 00 

" John Kingsbury, S. Dumfries 160 00 

" Flora Paterson, Rodney 100 00 

" Mrs. S. Poole, Norwich 704 41 

" Robert Craig, Cornwall 137 60 

Mrs. J. Maver, Pickering 300 00 

Donation, Mrs. A. J. McFall, Nobleton 250 00 

Bequest, James Irving, Guelph 25 00 

Transfer from Alexander McKinnon Fund 1,418 97 

Bequest, Rev. G. M. Clark, Halifax 460 00 

" Mrs. M. Wiggins, St. Ann's, Ont 150 00 

" F. G. McDonald, Gananoque 460 00 

" James Munroe, Brooke Township 50 00 

" James Kelso, Inverness, Que 426 38 

R. Irwin, Vaughan, Ont 1,316 65 

" W. Colquhoun, C rnwall 200 00 

William Magill, Brampton 750 00 

' James Begg, Roxborough 50 00 

" Mrs. Neil McTavish, South Mountain 200 00 

" Robert Young, Attwood ... 50 00 

" James Carnouhan, Tuckersmith 500 00 

" S. Carnochan, Egmondville 60 00 

" J. McAlister, East Wawanosh 50 00 

" R. W. Kennedy, Gosfield Township 2,536 25 

" J. R. McKenzie, Kenyon 600 00 

Mrs. S. McDougall, Strathroy 100 00 

Disbnrsemeiits, 

Transferred to Foreign Mission Ordinary Fund $11,085 26 

Balance at Cr., April 1st, 1900 30,000 00 



$41,085 26 



$41,085 26 




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162 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF THE PRESBYTERIAN 
COLLE(JE, HALIFAX, 1899-1900. 

Tv tlie Venerable the General, A.isemhhi : 

In submitting their Annual Report on this ocassion, the Board of Management i>f 
the Presbyterian College, Halifax, feel that their first duty is to give expression to their 
profound sense of the great loss which the Church has sustained in the removal, by death, 
of their late Secretary, Rev. P. M. Morrison, D.D. 

It is already known to the Assembly that at the time of their meeting last year, Dr. 
Morrison's health was far from good, and that for some months his strength had been 
failing. After the close of the meeting he sought rest and change, but without perman- 
ent beneficial results. Before he reached his home he was called away, and entered into 
his rest on .July 20th, 1899. The Board, in common with all the other Committees which 
he served so faithfully, put on record their high appreciation of his gifts, character, work 
and worth, and their estimate of the value of his services to the Church which he served 
so faithfully, and loved so well. 

As it will be necessary for the General Assembly to appoint some one to succeed the 
late Dr. Morrison as Agent, the Board of Management think that the time is opportune 
for reviewing and amending the regulations for the guidance of the Agent of the Church 
in the Eastern Section, and for adjusting more fully the relations lietween the Board, 
the Finance Committee and the Agent, and for determining more specifically their 
respective duties and responsibilities. With these objects in view, a Conference was 
held between a Committee of the College Board and your Finance Committee, at which 
a series of recommendations was made, of which the College Board has approved, and 
which they now submit for the consideration and action of the Assembly. As regard.s 
the Agent, it is recommended : 

First, That the Agent of the Church, Eastern Section, shall act as Secretary of the 
Home, Foreign Mission and Augmentation Committees, Eastern Section, and of the 
Board of Superintendence of the Presbyterian College, Halifax. As such, he shall con- 
vene these Committees and the College Board, keep the minutes, and conduct all corre- 
spondence connected with the same. Under Home Mission work shall be included tlie 
distribution of probationers. He shall also prepare for submission to the Assembly the 
'.nnual reports of the Committees and the College Board. 

Second, That he shall act as General Treasurer for all the Schemes, with the excep- 
tion of the Minister's Widow's and Orphan's Fund, in the Eastern Section of the Church. 
As such it shall be his duty : 

1. To receive and acknowledge all sums contributed to the Schemes. 

2. To take the general management of all the Funds, make investments of the same 
and collect interest, in connection with an Advisory Comnittee. 

3. To tran,sact all the current business of the Sch mes, and prepare the annual 
accounts . 

4. To transact all the business of the Hunter Fund for church building under the 
charge of the Synod of the Maritime Provinces, it being understood that that Fund shall 
bear its due proportion, with other funds, of his salary as Agent. 

5. That the Agent of the Church, for the time being, be a membei >ffi,rU> of the 
College Board. 

As regards the Advisory Committee referred to above, it is recommended : 

i. That the .-Vdvisory Committee be a Coimnittee of the College Board, inasmuch, as 
that Board being incorporated, hold all the investments of this section of the Church 
with which the Agent has to deal. 



163 



:.'. That with the view of the better eimhliiii,' the Cnlletto I'ofird to H|ij)(>iiit. nn ollici- 
eiit Ailviaory Committee, the lueinhers of the Fiiuiiice Committee, Kiistern Suction, 
,iii|Hiiiited fri»m yettr to yenr by tlio Oeiienl AsMembly, nlmll lie >'.>■ nffu-io members of the 
ijilkl,'!' Hotiid, (iiid, together with njiy others of its own membership whom the College 
r.iifird mny appoint, shall coiiHtitii^e the said Advisory Committee. 

;i. That the Advisory Committee have power of framing rules or Ity-law.s for the 
■jimlHiico of the Agent in all linancial matters connected with the diHchari^'e of his duties 
—said rules or by-laws to be 8ui)ject to the approval of the College Hoard. 

The lioard has not much that is unusual to reiK)rt in connection with their work 
ihiriiii,' the past year. The income hah been somewhat smaller, ami the expenditure 
considerably larger than for the previous year. Receipts from interest on investments 
were .*t;,740.()() ; from gifts, !?25(> ; from be<(ue8ts, IT)** ; and contrii)utions from lf<M 
coii^^regations ^4,l(i(;.87, making a total of Sil.L'OT.oM. 

The expenditure was as follows : Fov salaries of four professors and one lecturer in 
the I'resbyterian College, $8. ."50(1 ; for salary of one professor in Dalhousie College, 
,«fl,7,MI ; for assistant librarian, ^ilo ; for repairs t(j old builning and furnishing. ST-'W.Tl; 
Hiid for all other expenses, stated more in detail in the College Hoard accounts, .*14!U.4H, 
milking a total of $12,287.10, or $l,079.<)ti in excess of receipts. The balance on hand 
at the beginning of the year was §211. r»2, which has thus been changed into a balance 
due the Treasurer of $8(i8.14. Had the $r),0(M) which the Hoard asked congregations to 
contribute been realized, the year would have closed with little or no del)t. 

The receipts for the Hursary Fund for the year have been $8()1.5.S, of which §1^72.40 
were from interest on investments, $4.12 interest from other funds, and $481M8 collec- 
tiiins from sixty-seven congregations. Ten special bursaries were given amounting to 
§24"). The three prizes given at the close of the College were paid after the closing of 
the accounts for the year. The Hoarding Department was assisted to the extent of 
gr)0(l. Other payments were made amounting to $57.24, leaving a balance on hand at the 
close of the year of $10.79. 

The Library Fund received $103.1>1. For books and magazines $14(i..'it( were paid, 
and $12 for the Morrison Bursary, thus reducing the balance on hand of $118.41 at the 
end of the previous year, to $59.02 at the close of last year. 

The particulars in reference to capital invested for the College and Bursary Funds 
will be found in the report of the Finance Committee. 

The new College building has given great satisfaction to both i)rofessor . and stu- 
dents. The class rooms are large and comfortable, and the library has been so arranged 
and managed as to make it much more convenient and serviceable to those who wished 
to use it. Some progress has been made during the year in collecting the subscriptions 
previously made towards paying for the building, but in consequence of the effort on 
i)eha1f of the Century Fund, nothing has been done since last meeting of the Assembly 
in the way of obtaining new subscriptions. 

Prior to April 4th, 1899, there had come int. ■ the Treasury for the new College build- 
ing the sum of $11,759.72. Since that time $.'i,.W2.83 have been received through the 
ordinary channels, and $748 through the Century Fund for the payment of debt on the 
building, making a total of $4,110.8."^ received this year for this purpose. The debt on 
April 4th, 1899, was $4,705.11. Since that time the expenditure has been 84,111.49, mak- 
ing the debt at the end of last year $4,765.77. It is hoped that during the current y«ar, 
through the payment of subscriptions already made, and by means of contributions 
through the channel of the Century Fund, the greater part, if not the whole, of this debt 
will be paid. The cost of the new building will be nearly $21,0(X>. 

The Senate's Report indicates .the character of the work which has been done in tha 
College during the term which closed on April 25th last. 

The Board of Management carefully considered the remits sent down to them by the 
'Jeneral Assembly, and their findings will be reported in the usual way. 

The Board feel constrained to acknowledge gratefully the blessings which have 
crowned the year in connection with the work of the College, and they would earnestly 
pray that He who has been mindful of the Institution in the past would abundantly 
bless it still, making it more and more successful in training men for the work of gather- 
ing in and building up Christ's people, and evangelizing the wc rid. 

All of wh'ch is respectfully submitted. 



THOMAS SEDGWICK, 

Chniiinan. 



E. A. McCURDY, 

Ai-iinii Secretary. 



u 



m 



■ ■■[ 






164 



REPORT OF THE SENATE OF THE PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE, HALIFAX, 

SESSION 1899- 19(K). 

To the Venenible the Oenertd Aasemhlij : 

During the past session the number uf students registered in the College was thirty- 
eight, of whom fourteen were in the third year, sixteen in the second, six in the lir.st ; 
and there were two general students. Thu names are : 

Third F«'(tc ;— Frank Baird, M.A., Chipman, N.Il. ; Murdoch Buchanan, B.A., Ciipe 
Breton ; James 0. Colquhoun, B.A., Picton Co., N.S. ; Gordon Dickie, B. A., Milford, 
N.S. ; George A. Grant, M.A., Trinidad ; Archibald J. Macdonald, Cape Breton ; Drtuiel 
J. Macdonald, B. A., P. E. Island ; Finlay H. MicKintoah, M.A., Picton Co., N.S,; 
Robert P. Murray, Cape Breton ; Hibbert R. Read, B.A., Cumberland Co.; D.tvid .M. 
Roid, B. A., Muaquodoboit, N. S. ; D*ivid C. Ross, B.A., Picton Co., N.S. ; William A. 
Ross, B.A., Picton Co., N.S. ; George A. Sutherland, M.A,, Colchester Co., N.S. 

-SVro)i(/ rmc;— Adams D. Archibald, B.A., Halifax; Harold M. Clark, B.A., St. 
Stephen, N.B. ; \Vm. A. Cunningham, B.A., Colchester Co., N.S. ; Frank Fisher, 
B.A., Newfoundland ; George Ernest Forbes, 13. A.. Picton Co., N.S. ; Benjamin Glover, 
B A., P. E. Island ; John J. MacCaskill, Cape Breton ; Charles C. Macintosh, B.A., 
Cape Breton ; Robert G. MiicKay, Picton Co., N.S., Albert M. MacLeod, B.A., Picton 
Co.; John C. MacLeod, Cape Breton ; John W. A. Nicholson, M.A., Cape Bretcm ; Jus. 
A. Ramsay, B.A., P. E. Island ; George M. Ross, B.A., Picton Co.; W. H. Sedgwick, 
B.A., Mustjuodoboit, N.S.; George Wood, B.A., Halifax. 

First Year :—,1i,hn H. A. Anderson, B.A., P. E. Island ; Win. W. Conrad, B.A., 
Kings. Co., N.S.; Wm. J. Johnston, B.A., Newcastle, N.B.; Albert L. MacDougall, 
Moncton, N.B. ; D. H. MacKinnon, B.A., Sydney, C.B. ; John S. Ross, B.A.; Picton Co. 

Oenernl Stiulentu: — James MacDougall, P. E. Island ; V. D. Ruggles, Halifax. 

Tiie ordinary work of the yeir was conducted with very liti-le interruption from sick- 
ness ; the attendance was regular, and the diligence of the students is to be highly com- 
mended. The work of the various departments was as follows : 



i tenpa 



I. — Church History axd Homiletics. 

In the class of Church History which met four days a week, the general history of 
the Christian Church down to the time immediately preceding the Reformation was the 
subject of study. For this the students prepared with the aid of a text-book. In Scot- 
tish Church History, the period extending from the Restoration to the middle of the 
eighteenth century formed the subject of lecture and examinations in the class. In the 
class <jf Practical Theology, lectures were given twice a week, and at the close of the 
session a written examination upon the subjects of lecture was held. Some of the sub- 
jects usually included in this course were omitted for want of time. On one day in each 
week lectures and sermons were read and criticized. During last session thirty such 
discourses required by the Church were given. In the structure, style and composition 
of thope discourses there was an advance which was highly satisfactory. The work in all 
of the above classes has been well su<<tained by all the students throughout the session. 



e':! 



II. — Hebrew and Old Testament Exegetics. 

The Junior Hebrew class, which met five days a week, was attended by four students 
of the first year. Davidson's Hebrew Grammar and Reader was the text-book. The 
Senior Hebrew and Old Testament Exegetical class, composed of the students of the 
second and third years, met four times a week. Monday was devoted to Old Testament 
introduction, general and special. For this subject a text-book was used, supplemented 
by extracts from other books and by oral instruction. On Tuesday a course of lectures 
was delivered on several of the Minor Prophets, and a brief course on the exegesis of the 



■ 



165 

first oi^'ht chapterH of iBaUli. HeWrew wkh studied on WedtiosdHy. Selections were rend 
from the more ditKcult bookn. PiirsinK, syntax, Hnd the niasnoriih received attention. 
On Friday a course of leotureH was delivered on I'entateuchal CriticiHUi, the aim Itein;^ 
U) j^ivo a full and impartial statement of the argurrant for and against the viewH of the 
new critical school. Students of the third year prepared a Hehrew critical exercise. 
During the term two written examinations were held with satisfactory results. 

III.— Apolooktics a:iu Svhtkmatk; Tiieoloov. 

In the clafls of Apologetics, which meets daily, and is attended by students of t)ic 
tirst year, attention is specially directed to the grounds of Theistic lielief, Anti-theistic 
TlieoriuH, the Trustworthiness of the Gospels, general Christian Evidences and Compara- 
tive Uoligi(m. In addition to rim vitcf examinations, two essays were re(|uired of each 
gtudont, the subjects being " The Conception of God as Personal," and '"The World by 
Wisdom knew not God." 

In the class of Systematic Theology, which meets daily, and is attended by the 
stiidonta of the second and third years, the subjects considered were, the Doctrine of 
.Miiii, the Doctrine of Sin, the Person of Christ and the Atonement. ^ In the department 
of Miblical Theology, which forms part of the work of this class, the special subject was 
the Pauline Theology. In addition to the regular ex'^minations, each student was re- 
(liiired to submit two essays, the subjects beini{. " Man made in the Image of God," and 
"The Influence of St. Paul's Personal Experience uptm his Teaching." 

IV. — Nkw Testament Exeoetics. 

In the classes of the first year, which were attended by four students, the chief sub- 
ji'ct of study was the life of Christ. Two days a week were devoted to an interpretation 
(if the (iospel of Luke, of which chapters ix, 51,-xviii were read, together with selections 
from xix-xxiv dealing with closing scenes of the life of our Lord. On one day a week 
the early ministry of Jesus was studied as recorded in John i-vi. Another day was spent 
on the grammar of New Testament Greek and Textual Criticism ; and the fifth on Intro- 
duction to the Gospels and the history of Palestine in the time of Christ. Two essays 
were written by the class, one on the term " Sqn of Man," another on "The Narratives 
of the Infancy." 

In the Senior class, which is attended by students of the second and third years, the 
Epistle to the Hebrews formed the main theme of work ; and of this, chapters i-x, 18, 
and part of xi, wore read with much care. On one day a week a passage from 1st Peter, 
on which the class had previously handed in a written paraphrase, was critically dis- 
cussed ; and in this way three chapters of the Epistle were dealt with. A weekly lecture 
was delivered on the sources for the study and the history of the Apostolic Age till the 
Cinnicil of Jerusalem. Students of the second year prepared ciiLical essays and exercises 
on passages from the New Testament. 

v.— Elocution. 

The students of the third year met on thne days of the week during that part of the 
course preceding the Christmas holidays. Sp..cial attention was given to the reading of 
Forms of Service in Public Worship. Lectures were also given on the Public Statutes of 
Canada so far as these relate to ministerial work. After the holidays, exercise in extem- 
porary speaking took up the remainder of the time. 

The students of the second year attended on four days of the week. The work in 
this class consisted chiefly in reading from the Scriptures and selections from the Book 
of Praise. Attention was also given to tht, ['nnciples of modulation, expressive delivery, 
the uses of the imagination, and gesture. 

On Friday of each week lectures were given on the sources of power in delivery. 
At the close of the term the students passed a satisfactory examination, written and oral, 
and the prize for the best reading of the Scriptures was awarded to Mr. W. H. Sedgwick. 

Three hours of each day were devoted to the students of the first year. The work 
in this class is largely individual, ant special attention is given to the removal of any 
peculiarity in respiraticm and vocalization. At the close of the term this class passed a 
very creditable written examination, and a prize was given to Mr. J. S. Ross for the 
highest marks in the examination. 



1 




1 

1 





166 






■ 1: : i 



.'■I 




A now (lopiirtiiie whs iimdo during tliu jivHt HUrtHJuii, tlio HtiidoiitH nf tliu soiMud liml 
third yt^iirH liuiiii; roi|Uirod to dulivur i>xtuin|>uniry diNt'oursuK m tlic nroKeiu'ii nf tliu 
ItrofuNHorn itiul of ihoir follow Htuduiitn. This oxurciNu, th<iii({h ivi tii'Nt ii littlu trying, wuh 
found to III) vory |irolitikl)Kt mh\ wiin i^ruiitly ii|i|ii'U('iiitod Ity tho ntiiduiitn. 

Koiir otiididiit ('.■-, cHiiiu foiWHrd for tho lirHt piirt of t)iu dttiirou of li.h., itiid till pHsx'ii 
ert'ditalily. Tlioy uio iho Kov. A. K. KiBhor, 15. A., W \ Heor^u A. tirmit. M.A.; llil> 
hort 1{. Kotid, 15. A.; (JoorKO A. Sutiiorliiiid, M.A. The Kov. Alliiii Mimhhi Hill. 15, A . 
wlio |»iH8i'd th(> lirNt |iurt lust your, pruAuiitod hiiiiNulf for uxiiiniiiittion in thi> ni'cond piiii 
ill till) dupHrtiiioiit, of Cliureh IliHtory. INIr. Ilill'N exiiiiiiuHtion wiis thoroui^hly niitiHfac- 
tory. Hiiil th« do>;roo of H.I). whh confurrud u|Mm him lit Spring ('oiivo'jiilion. 

During,' tho winter liio work of the Collonu whh much fiicilitatod l)y the (ucomniiHln 
tioii of the iiuw ItuildiiiK, '^'"' ^''^ lihrnry is now to i< dc^rou liithurto imposniMu of ^mimi 
adviiiitii^u to tho Ntiidunt, nnd Iihh liucomu it viiluiiblu fHctor in our educiitiotiHl triiiniii'.'. 

Tho Somite would cull iitteiition to tlio fiict, thtit thougii the hocoii'' Jind third yours 
Hre litr^'e, tho numlior in iittondHncu on tho tirst your is Niniillor thiiii ubuhI, iind they .iro 
of opinion thiit II further diminution nmy ho reported next yortr. With tho demiiiidH ut 
our own jirowiii),' fields iiiid of our North-West, to which, this year, at least four of our 
graduates proceed, the necoHNity of «)ur T'roHhyteries directing; their attention to socurini; 
Buitalile candidates for the ministry, is accentuated. 



Respectfully suhmittod, 

ALLAN roLLOK, 

VliiuruKDi. 



ROHKRT A. FALCONKR, 



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.Milium tl»*' 
t|„> rhvirc 

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nine w*'^' 

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int-nt, i»»u 

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hoth tVo\ 

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lessor H( 

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investei' 

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in the : 

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1(17 



I'UKSHYTEUIAN COLLKdK, MO.NTItKAL. 



KKl'»»UT OF TKK MOAKD OF MANAOMMKNT OF THF JMtKSIlVTFUI AN 
COI.LKOK, MONTIIKAL, Foil TIIK VKAU ISStJMJMM). 




To till' Vcnei'uhle the (h'lieral Amembhj ; 



'I'lif Hoiinl of Miiii!iv;*Hnfiil of tlu> I'lCHliytrriaii ('ollt-j^c, .Moiitifiil. in prcs- 
t'liliii;; tlu'ir uiiiiiial report, desire to «'XpreHH tlicir i^rutitiKle to tlu- nieat MnuX of 
till' Cliurcii for the meuHiire of siiecess voiiciiHafetl to llie iiislitutioii (liiriii^j tlie year. 

'i'lu' total niiiiilier of stiuleiits enrolled was fifty-nine. Of this niinihei- twenty- 
nine were in the 'rheoloj.;ieal Classes, tw<'l\<' of \\ liom completed their course. 

The Board (lesire to |)lttce on record their appreciation of the .services of the 
liite y\\'. .lohn .^^tirlinjj, whose re«'ent removal by <leatli they nionrn. From the 
inception of tho College, Mr. Stirling acted as Secretary of the Hoard of Manage- 
ment, and checrfidly devoted tim and thought to the furtherance of its work. 

.\s will be seen from the ai companying financial statement . thiMc has been 
added to the Endowment i-'und the sum of !!S44t>..'i7. Of this amount $42»!.;<7 were 
received from the p]xccutors of the late Mr. .lames Kelso. County .Megantic. (Quebec. 
It is pleasing to kiutw that the friends of the College remember it in this form. The 
ordinary revenue has been sutlicieiit to meet the expenditure of the year, leaving 
a balance on haiul of !i!427.4(). It is eiieoiu'aging to note that tlu' amount received 
both from interest on investnuuits, an<l also from congregational contributions, are 
in excess of last year. The generous friend, who. since the apiiointment ol' Pro- 
fessor Ross, has met in full the salary of his Chair, continued t«» d(» .so lor the year 
just endeil. 

From the estate of the late Mr. (Jeorge Sherill' .Morrice there have been 
received .•?!>, OOO, with which to found three lU'W scholarships, and !!<1. .'>()() to be 
invested and the interest api»lied to the nniintenance of the Library. Mr. William 
.1. Morrice. of Montreal, has intimateil his intention to found a travelling fellow- 
ship of the value of .*.")()(» annually. This will l)e open for competition to the 
students next .session. Dr. F. W. Kelley has also intimated bis intention of endow- 
ing a scholarship of .'?i2") for competition among students in the Arts' cour.se, and 
in the nu>antinu' will provide the amount from year to yeai'. .\s will be .seen from 
the appended statement of the Treasurer, the funds of the College are fully 
invested in securities, every one of which is in a satisfactory condition, the net 
revenue derivable from these being about five per cent, per annum. 

it is exceedingly desirable that the Endowment Fund Ik- considerably 
increased in the near future, so as to provi<le income sutlicient for the sujiport ot 
the Exegetical Chair, the subscrii)tions pledged for the period of five years in this 
connection maturing next year. In the pre.sent prosperous condition of the 
<'ountry. it is not unreasonable to expect that friends of the College will remember 
its claims to liberal ami generous support. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

DAVID MORRICE, Chairman. 
WM. YUILE, Secretary. 
Montreal, May 23rd, I'MO. 



mk 



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ii 



'■^1 

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il 



168 



REPORT OF THE SENATE OF THE PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE, 

MONTREAL. 

To the Venerable the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Canada : 

The Senate of the Presbyterian College, Montreal, desires to express its grati- 
tuJe to the Giver of all good on the successful termination of another Session. 
Owing to an increase in the fees of the Arts Faculty in McGill University, and 
other causes, the number of students enrolled has been somewhat smaller than 
in previous years, in all amounting to flfty-nine, of whom twenty-nine were in the 
Theological classes. This College and the University have taken steps to meet the 
difficulty arising from fees by considerably increasing the number and value of 
competitive scholarships, offered to students. The health of Professors and 
students has been, on the whole, excellent, although two of the latter were tem- 
porarily laid aside by sickness. One case of serious discipline involved suspt ion. 

Professor Ross obtained leave of absence early in February, in order to avail 
himself of an opportunity to travel in the East. Before leaving, however, he com- 
pleted his courses of lectures, and the examinations on the same. Principal ^lac- 
Vicar kindly assumed the hearing of discourses on his behalf, and the setting and 
examining of the Honour papers in his department. Otherwise .the work of the 
College went on as usual ; ■ the classes in Systematic Theology being taught by 
Principal Mac Vicar ; those in Biblical and Church History and Apologetics, by 
Professor Campbell ; those in French Theology, by Professor Coussirat ; those in 
Introduction and Greek and Hebrew Exegesis by Professor Scrimger ; and those iu 
Homiletics, Pastoral Theology, Church Government, and Biblical Theology by Pro- 
fessor Ross ; Elocution was taught by Mr. J. P. Stephen. A. T. Taylor, Esq., 
F.R.I.B.A., R.C.A., not only gave his valuable services without fee, as lec- 
turor in Ecclesiastical Architecture, but also offered a special prize in his subject. 
The lecturers in Classics and Mathematics were: Messre. D. M. McLeod, B.A., 
and J. B. McLeod, B.A., with whom were associated as examiners, the Revs. E. 
A. MacKenzie, B.D., B.A., and J. R. Dobson, B.D., B.A. 

At the Entrance Examinations in October, 1899, the following students were 
admitted : 

To ihe Third Year in Theology — Mr, J. G. Hobman, 

To the Second Year in Theology — Mr. E. L. Pidgeon. 

To the First Year in Theology — Mr. J. H. Laverie, B, A, 

To the Second Year, Arts — Mr, M. Jack. 

To the First Year, Arts — Messrs. E. H. Gray and W. H. May. 

To the First Year, Literary — Messrs. L. Bourgoin, A. Charron, A. Lauriu, E- 
Melieres, G. L, Mitchell, J. D. MacKenzie, J. H. Sharp, W. Tucker, J. Woodsidct 
and J. W. Woodside. 

The following were admitted to the first year in Theology : 

Messrs. \V. G. Brown, B.A., C. F. Cruchon, J. G. Greig, C. Lapointe, H. S. 
Lee, B.A,, P. H. Luttrill, J. B, MacLeod, B.A., A. B. MacLeod, A. J. Rondeau, 
and D. Stewart, B.A. 

Post graduate work was undertaken by the Revs. D. D. Miller and Daniel 
Fiske, B.A. 

At the closing examinations in March, the following students completed their 
years successfully : 

Third year Theology — Messrs. L. Abram, H. Ferguson, J. G. Hobman, G. Mac- 
Gregor, H. McKay, B.A., D. M. MacLeod, B.A., J. T. Reid, M.D., Jas. Stuart, 
B.A., W. P. Tanner, W. D.Turner, B.A., J. A. Wheeler, and F. J. Worth, B.A. 



Second 
p. Campbell,! 

First Ye 
Greig, J. H 
MacLeod, an] 

Third 
E. Tuvkingt 

Second 
ToiK'hette. 

First Y( 
Mat'Kenzie, 

side and J. ^ 

Successfi 

C. Clarke, o 

Tlie llev. J. 

of Atwood. 

taken by the 

McVicar, B 

Patterson, B 

The Re 

an-ibed exan 

the marks ol 

high stiuidiii 

degree of 

honori>> upoi 

Rev. W. A. 



D 



The foil' 

Hiudents' Go 

Students' SU 

r. Kedpath 

J. Redpath . 

P. Morrice . 

W. Brown . 

W. Paul . . 

St. Andrew 

CreM'ent Sti 

H. Mackay 

Lochead . . 

J. Sinclair 

Sor-West 

Knox Chill 

WiUiam B. 

Hnmilion I 

Emily H. 

Stirling . . 

Xcw Edin 

Er>*lcinc C 

Elocution 

u 

Ecclesiasi 

u 

Society, I 

(1 

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.i;^ic-^.m-=^^v sm 



169 

Hfcond Year, Theology — Messrs. W. Akitt, F. J. Anderson, A. G. Cameron, J. 

D. Campbell, E. L. Pidgeou, G. W. Thom, H. H. Turner, B.A., and G.Yule. 

First Year, Theology— Mesars. W. S. Brown, E.A., V. F. Cruchon, J. G. 
Greig, J. H. Laverie, B.A., H. L. Lee, B.A., C. Lapointe, P. H. Luttrell, A. B. 
MacLeod, and J. B. MacLeod, B.A. 

Third Year, Literary — Messrs. N. V. McLeod, P. Mathieson, J. Swinton and 

E. Tiirkington. 

Second Year, Literary — Messrs. J. D. Morrow, H. 1). Robertson and W. 
Toucliette. 

First Year, Literary — Messrs. F. Bourgoin, A. Charron, A. Laurin, J. D. 
MacKenzie, E. Melieres, G. Mitchell, J. H. Sharpe, W. L. Tucker, J. H. Wood- 
>i(le and J. W. Woodside. 

Successful examinations for the degree of B.D. were pa.ssed by the liev. Wylie 
C. Clarke, of Brampton, and Mr. George MacGregor, the gold medalist of the year. 
The Rev. J. L. Campbell, B.D., of Chicoutimi, and the Rev. P. A. Macleod, B.D., 
of Atwood, Ont., were a<lmitted ad eundem gradum. Part of the B.D. work was 
taken bv the Rev. J. Nasmith, M.A., of the Univer.sity of Kansas, the Rev. D. 
McVicar, B.A., the Rev. D. Fiske, B.A., the Rev. D. D. Millar, and the Rev. W. 
Patterson, B.A. 

The Rev. J. F. MacLaren, B.D., of Rocklyn, successfully passed the, pre- 
!icril)e(l examination in the department of Theology, taking over ninety per cent of 
the marks of the ten papers ; and the Rev. G. H. Smith, B.D., M.A., Ph.D., took 
liigh standing in the department of Ecclesiologj', both candidates receiving the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity. The Senate likewise conferred the degree cavsa 
honoris upon the Rev. Allan Findlav, Superintendent of Missions, and ujyon the 
Rev. W. A. MacKenzie, B.D., M.A.,'of New York. 



The following awards were made at the Convocation on April 4th : 



Students'' Gold Medal 

Stitdents^ Silver Medal 

P. Redpath Scholarship, 

J. Redpath " 

D. Morrice " 

W. Brown 

W. Paul 

St. Andrew's, London 

Crescent Street 

H. Mackay 

Lochead 

J. Sinclair 

Xor-lVest 

Knox Church, Perth 

William Boss 

Hinnilton {McNab Street) 

Emily H. Frost 

Stirling • • 

Xrw Edinburgh 

Erskine Church 

Elocution, 1st Prize 

'• 3nd " 

Ecclesiastical A rchitecture, 1st . . . 

" '' Lecturer'' s 
Society, Speaking 

' ' English Reading 

" French " 

" English Essay 

" French " 



1 1 

u 
f I 



(1 



u 
u 



11 
(1 
(1 
It 
11 
ll 
(I 



$70. 

50. 
100. 

50. 

50. 

50, 

50. 

60. 

40, 

25. 



9.^ 



50 . . . 
40 . . . 
40... 
35 . . . 
50.. . 
50... 
50.. . 

Books , 

1 1 

(1 
(1 
(( 
(1 
(1 
(1 
(( 



1 . 

11 



11 
11 



Mr. G. MacGregor, B.D. 
'• F. J. Worth, B.A. 
'• W. G. Brown, B.A. 
'■ J. B. MacLeod, B.A. 

H. H. Turner, B.A. 

E. L. Pidgoon. 

A. B. MacLeod. 

A. G. Cameron. 

D.M. MacLeod, B.A. 

G. MacGregor. B.D. 

A. W. Lochead. 

J. G. Hobnian. 

H. S. Lee, B.A. 

C. Lapointe. 

L. T. Abram. 

W. T. Touchcttc. 

E. Melieres. 

A. B. McLeod. 

C. ITardv, B.A. 

.1. B. McLeod, B. A. 

H. H. Turner, B.D. 

J. B. MacLeod, B.A. 

J. A. Stuart, B.A. 

H. Mackay, B.A. 

U. Mackay, B.A. 

A. G. Cameron. 

A. M. Charron. 

J. G. Hobman. 

C. Lapointe. 



:rT.\- 










170 

In iuMitiun to thcso awards the Senate has pleasure in informing tiie (^ienciai 
Assembly, that, through the generosity of Mr. David Morrice, the Cliairman of iho 
College iioard. and members of his family, it will be enabled to oHer for coinpc. 
tition next session three endowed seholarshij)s, eaeh of the annual value of tifty 
dollars, for ]>roficiency in theologieal study, from the estate of the late <it<)rj;e 
Sheritr Morriee ; also a Travelling Fellowshii), to the value of five hundred dollars, 
contributed by Mr. Wni. J. Morriee, and bearing his name. 

The Alumni Assoeiation of the College, having elected the Kevs. J. F. Mac- 
Laren, ]).D., Andrew Russell, B.A., E. A. Mackenzie, Ji.D., li.A., to re})reseiit it, 
the Senate recommends that their names be included in the Senate of 1{)00-19(II. 



All of which is respectfully sidnnitted. 



I). H. MacVICAR, Prhicipal. 



Presbyterian College, Montreal, April 19th, 1900. 



ir; I; 



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171 



PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE, MONTREAL. 

IN ACCOUNT WITH REV. R. H. WARDEN, D.D., Tkeasurkr. 

For the Year Ending March 31st, 19(X>. 



I.— ENDOWMENT FUND. . 

Becpipts, 

By Balance oii hand, April Ist, 1899 8214,491 (il 

Contributions 440 37 

Interest from investments 9,713 05 

Disbursementti. 

To Interest credited to ordinary revenue $9,713 05 

Balance on hand, April lat, 1900 214,937 98 

II.— ORDINARY FUND. 

Receipts. 

By Balance on hand, April Ist, 1899 $209 71 

Interest from Endowment Fund 9,713 05 

A Friend, Montreal 2,750 00 

Exegetical Chair Fund 1,505 00 

Congregational contributions 2,4*i5 80 

Special contributions 280 15 

Disbursements, 

To Salary of Principal, Professors, Lecturers, etc $12,. 350 00 

Gas, $456.17 ; Fuel, $1,090.05 1,552 22 

Insurance, $213.75 ; Water, $128.04 341 79 

Printing, Advertising and Stationery 199 31 

Repairs, Furnishings, etc 831 70 

Plumbers' accounts 123 79 

Auditor's fees 25 00 

French Board, for French Professor's sr.iary 1,012 50 

Proportion of General Expenses 00 00 

Balance on hand, April 1st, 1900 427 40 

III.— EXEGETICAL CHAIR FUND. 

Receipts, 

By Balance on hand, April Ist, 1899 $500 CO 

Contributions 1,505 00 

Disbursements. 

To Credit to ordinary revenue $1,505 00 

Balance on hand, April 1st, 1900 500 00 



$224,051 03 



$224,651 03 



),923 77 



$10,923 77 



$2,005 00 



$2,005 00 



172 



'1 



'^^ . 



1 1 



I. i 



'i; 






-r 





IV.— SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND. 

/Receipts. 

By Balance on hand, April lafc, 1899 $5,924 00 

G. S. M. scholarship 1,000 00 

Mrs. D. M. scholarship 1,000 00 

E. McD. M. acholarship 1,000 00 

Interest from investments 284 70 

Disbursements. 

To Interest credited to Scholarship Ordinary Fund $284 70 

Balance on hand, April 1st, 1900 8,924 00 

v.— SCHOLARSHIP ORDINARY FUND. 

Receipts. 

By Balance on hand, April 1st, 1899 $670 80 

Contributions 688 00 

Interest from Scholarship Endowment Fund 284 70 

Disbursements. 

To Scholarships and Prizes $983 50 

Balance on hand, April Ist, 1900 660 00 

VI.— LIBRARY ENDOWMENT FUND. 

Receipts. 

By Balance on hand, April 1st, 1899 $460 00 

George Sheriff Morrice Endowirent 1,500 00 

Interest on investments 24 60 

Disbursements. 

To Interest credited to Ordinary Library Fund $24 60 

Balance on hand, April 1st, 1900 1,960 00 

VIT.— LIBRARY ORDINARY FUND. 

Receipts. 

By Balance on hand, April Ist, 1899 $209 06 

Collection at opening of College 17 30 

Interest from investment 24 60 

Disbursements. 

To Books, Magazines, etc $8 10 

Balance on hand, April 1st, 1900 242 86 

VIII.— BUILDING FUND. 
To Balance at Dr., April 1st, 1900 



$9,208 70 



$9,208 70 



$1,643 50 



$1,643 m 



$1,984 60 



$1,98460 



$250 96 



$250 96 



$26,200 00 



By Balance! 
Contrib^ 
Interest 



To Medals] 
Balance 



By Balance 
Fees re 



To Diplom 
Balanci 



By Balanc( 
Contril 



To Balanc 



By Balan( 



College E 

College 

Exegeticf 

Scholars! 

Scholars! 

Library ] 

Library < 

Building 

Calvin G 

Senate 1 

McGill < 

Profit ai 

Balance 



173 

IX.-CALVIN GOLD MEDAL FUND. 

Beceipts. 

By Balance on hand, April Ist, 1899 $602 34 

Contributionfl 10 00 

Interest from investments 34 20 

$646 54 

Disbursements. 

To Medals (two years) $73 72 

Balance on hand , April Ist, 1900 572 82 

^64 6 64 

X.-SENATE FUND. 

Receipts. 

By Balance on hand, April 1st, 1899 $1 94 

Fees received for degrees 140 00 

$141 94 

Disbursements. 

To Diplomas, etc $105 09 

Balance on hand, April 1st, 1900 •. 36 86 

$141 94 

' XL— McGILL COLLEGE FEES. 

Receipts. 

By Balance on hand, April 1st, 1899 $40 00 

Contribution 5 00 

$45 00 

Disbursements. 

To Balance on hand, April 1st, 1900 $45 00 

XII.-PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT. 

Receipts. 
By Balance on hand, as at April Ist, 1899 $4,540 13 

BALANCE SHEET. 

April, 1900. Dr. Cr. 

College Endowment Fund $214,937 98 

College Ordinary Fund 427 40 

Exegetical Chair Fund ^ 500 00 

Scholarship Endowment Fund 8,924 00 

Scholarship Ordinary Fund 660 00 

Library Endowment Fund 1,960 00 

Library Ordinary Fund 242 86 

Building Fund $26,200 00 

Calvin Gold Medal Fund 572 82 

Senate Fund 36 85 

McGill College Fees 45 00 

Profit and Loss Account 4,540 13 

Balance 206,647 04 

$232,847 04 $232,847 04 



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174 



■'ret 





The above balance is thus invested :-- 

City of Montreal stock 

Mortgages : — C. P. R 

W. C. ($1,566 and f 1,5(X)") '. '. 

.1. R 

L. 

D. E 

J. S 

H. W. S 

D. G. G 

W. R. C 

J. VV 

W. D. S 

G. T. L 

D. CJ. M 

A. B. M 

E. M 

W. M. K 

A. W 

J. McG 

Montreal B.S 

J. L. D 

" Mrs A. B 

W. G. C 

C. C. B 

Mrs. N. D 

Mrs. H. W. S 

N. D 

Cash on hand 



I have audited the books of the Rev. R. H, Warden, D.D., as Treasurer of the 
Presbyterian College, Montreal, for the year ending March 31st, 1900, and certify that 
the cash re« jipts have been correctly accounted for. The expenditure has been com- 
pared with tne vouchers and agree? therewith. The balance sheet and accompanying; 
statement, showing the details of the investments, are in accordance with the Ledger 
accounts, and are certified correct. 

ANDREW JEFFREY, 

Auditor. 
Toronto, Maij 8th, 1900. 



$l(K) 00 




I),000 00 




15,500 00 




3,(X)0 00 




8,500 00 




3,500 00 




7,0(J0 00 




0,000 00 




5,0<J0 00 




1,100 00 




9,()00 00 




7,000 (M) 




25,000 00 




10,000 00 




5,000 00 




3,000 00 




7,500 00 




10,000 00 




6,000 (JO 




3,000 00 




400 00 




7,WK) 00 




15,000 00 




5,000 00 




10,100 00 




9,000 00 




2,000 00 




9,000 00 




1,347 04 




sSOiW^ It i "^ 


04 






tmmm 



175 




QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 

The Trustees respectivt-ly submit the Itdlowiiij; Report of the Fifty-ninth 

Session : 

I. — Attkndanck. 

The number of students continues to increase at the average rate, (from teu 
to thirty per Session), which has prevailed for thirty years past. The to\ il number 
last Session, in Arts, 'J'heology, Medicine, and Practical Science, was (UJO, an in- 
crease of 25 over 18!>8-}>. The number in Theology was M. the following being 
tiic names of those who comi)leted their three vears course to-day : 

C. A. Ferguson, B. A. ; T. F. Heeny, B. A. ; W. A. Mcllfoy, M. A. ; I). A. 
McKenzie, B.A. ; ILL. McKiunon, B.A. ; M. A. McKinnon, M.A. ; T. L. Trittie, 
H. A. ; I). M. Robertson, B. A. ; J. S. Shortt, M. A. ; T. R. Wilson. B. A. ; S. A. 
Woods, B. A. It may be noted that Messrs. Alexander, Frizzell, Gordon, I'ater- 
soii and Walker, who were mentioned in last year's Report as having completed 
tlic second year, went to Manitoba College for their third Session, in order to serve 
the Church a year sooner in the North-West. 

II. — Additional Professor in Theology. 

We reported last year that, though $20,000 was still required for the endow- 
ment of an additional Professor, it was resolved to make an a)>i)ointmcnt at the 
next annual meeting of the Board, and that a Committee had undertaken to laise 
the required amount. The action taken by the General Assembly with regard to^ 
the Century Fund, ma«le it impossible for the Committee to move in the matter. 
It woidd have been disloyal to the Assembly to have done anytiiing. On the con- 
traiy, the Finance and Estate ("ommittee, immediately after th'.; A.ssembly lose, 
met and agreed to place at the disposal of the Moderator, the services of the Rev. Dr. 
T. G. Smith — then General Secretary of the University, — his salary to be i)ai(l by 
tfie University as usual. His severe illness soon after and his untimely death i re- 
vented the good results that were expected from hisAvise co-operation, botli by the 
("ommittee and the Moderator. In the death of Dr. Smith, the I'niversity lias lost 
a truly loyal graduate, and the Church a devoted minister. Although the en«low- 
ment of the chair had been but partially secured, the Board felt that a longer 
delay in making an appointment was unnecessary, as„ only six month's salaiy 
would be called for this year, and there could be no reasonable doubt that $40,000 
would be forthcoming from tlie Century Fund before next May. From a list of 
candidates placed before the Board's Committee, the name of Rev. Samuel ^Ic- 
ComH M.A., a minister of the Irish Presbyterian Church, who sid)sequently 
served the English and U. S. Presbyterian Churches, was selected, and the Board, 
to-day, appointed him Professor of Church History, and History of Doctrine. Mr. 
McCorab took an exceptionally brilliant course in Arts and Theology in Magee 
and Belfast Colleges, and subsequently in Oxford and Berlin. His certificates are 
from the highest authorities in Ireland, Oxford an<i New York. The Board feels 
assured that the General Assembly will cordially ajiprove of this appointment and 
will instruct the Presbytery of Kingston to receive Mr. McComb. 



■i 



I: 









176 



Constitutional Changes. 

The Trustees had before them suggestions with regard to making their 
body more representative, especially of the graduates who are now the basal con- 
Btitueucy of the Scottish Universities, and with regard to governing the theological 
faculty by a special Board appointed by the General Assembly. A Committee was 
appointed to consider the matter, and the Trustees respectfully ask the General 
Assembly to ai)point a Committee to confer with it regarding the relations of the 
Church to the University. 

Financial Statement. 

Although the amount receivea from the General Assembly's College Fund was 
a little less than last year, we have again to report a small surplus revenue. 
For four years i)ast we have had no deficits, for the Board then decided that no 
matter what the ec )n()my that had to be practised, the existih.; deficit — whicJi had 
accumulated from the partial failure of the Assembly's Collejre Fund for years — 
must not be increased. On account of the addition of Professors Jordan and Mc- 
Comb to the statl', the amount to be asked f-om congregations will be lai-ger than 
before, and to this the old deficit may legif intely be added, when its cause is con- 
sidered. Notice lias been received by the Bi a;c that the $2,200 hitherto given by 
th» Temporalities Fund, ceases witli the close ' hssyear. 

Alumni CoNFERiSNCE. 

The annual meeting of this p ofitabir ' unference begins on the second Monday 
of February. Many of the best ])aper' ad at it will be found in Queen'' a Quarterly, 
the price of which is $1.00 a year. 1\. R. Carmichael, M. A., Queen's University. 
Kingston, is the agent and managing editor. 

The Calendar, Part 1, can be had gratia by applying to the Registrar. 



Kingaton, May Snd, 1900. 



J. B. McIVER, 

Secretary- Treasurer. 



STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE, 
KINGSTON, FOR THE YEAR ENDING APRIL 2nd, 1900. 

Revenue. 

Temporalities Board $2,000 00 

Tlie Professors, IJenefi 'Maries of the Temporalities Board . 200 00 

Kingston ObservatoiT — Grant from Government 500 00 

Rent of Carruthers' Hall 1,250 00 

Kent of lands 142 00 

School of Mining for Lecturer on Mechanism 500 00 

Chancellor's Lectureship 250 00 

Hugh Waddell — Lectureship on Church Histoiy 250 00 

John Roberts Allan — Chair of Botany 150 00 

Fees 13,700 08 

Interest on Mortgages and other securities : . . . . 20,112 29 

General Assembly's College Fund : 

Church Agents $2,124 48 

Congregations contributing direct .... 1,315 27 

8,439 70 

Receipts for Scholarships 2,217 04 

Interest on Jubilee Fund Subscriptions 8,283 01 

Balance deficiency 8,273 58 

t8g>207 70 



Queen' 
Exa 



PR 
PR 
Pn 

$•2.00. 
Pi 
Pi 

P 

raurH 

staue, 
P 
Laiiei 
s^l.OO 
^20.0 
$10.0 
$S.20 

lingt 
Kno; 
cestt 

Arn 



^. .;:^.,.u\tii<iiiyyii ii i ii ii i i i w fii 



177 



Expenditure. 

Djfioienoy 1898-9 18,359 40 

Sulariea— ProfcHBore and Lecturers in Theology 8,050 00 

" Professors and Tutors in Arts 25,793 00 

" Other Officers 2,955 26 

Chancellor's Lectureship 250 00 

Church Agents — Commission on Collections for General 

Assembly's College Fund 60 00 

Insurance 350 17 

Library, Laboratories, Museum, Gymnasium, Ac 2,994 21 

Practical Science Department . 879 99 

Taxes, repairs and grounds 1,43G 29 

Schohirship account 2,217 04 

Advertising, i)rinting, stationery and stipplies 1,(587 58 

Travelling cvpenses 434 35 

Fuel, water, gas and electricity (510 70 

Jledals and memorial brasses 75 61 

Coutingencies 114 1 1 



$56,267 70 



Queen' a College, Kingston, May let, 1900. 

Examined and found correct. 

D. CALLAGHAN, ) .„..,«,. 
J. E. CLARK, I ^«'**'o*-»- 



J. B. McIVER, 

Treaeurer. 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY'S COLLEGE FUND. 



Presbytkry of Sydney, C.B. — N. Shore St. Ann's, $10.00. 

PRE.SBYTERY OF HALIFAX. — Halifax, Fort Massey, $35.00. 

PRE.SBYTERY OF Prince Edward ISLAND. — Murray Harbor South, P.E.I., 
$2.00. 

Presbytkry of St. John's.— St. Stephen's, N.B., $25.00. 

PuKSBYTKRY OF QUEBEC. — Tlirec llivers, $5.00 ; Windsor Alills, $1.00 ; Dun- 
dee, Zicm, $5.00 ; Hampden. $4.00; Melbourne, St. Andrew's, .$2.00. 

Prksbytkry of Montreal. — Montreal, St. Gabriel, $20.00 ; Montreal, St. 
I'aul's, $275.00 ; Hemmingford, $5.00 ; Lachine, St. Andrew's, $15.25 ; Athel- 
stane, $2.00 ; Cliatham and Point Fortune, $7.27. 

PRE8BYTERY OF GLENGARRY. — MaxviUe, $25.00 ; Comwall, St. Johh's, $40.00 ; 
Lancaster, Knox, $12.61 ; Williamstown, St. Andrew's, $18.95 ; Pleasant Valley, 
*1.00 ; Kirkhill, $15.00 ; Dalhousie Mills and Cote St. George, $8.00 ; Comwall, 
$20.00; Lunenburg and Pleasant Valley, $10.00; Martintown, St Andrew's, 
$10.00; South Finch, St. Luke's and Crysler, Knox, $10.00; Summerstown, Salem, 
$8.20. 

Presbytery of Ottawa. — L'Original S.S., $5.00; North Gower and Wei- 
ll n<> ton, $5.00 ; Metcalfe, $2.50 ; Carp, Lowry and Kinburn, $5.00 ; Ottawa, 
Knox, $10.00 ; Manotick, $1.00 ; Ottawa, St. Andrew's, $100.00 ; South Glou- 
cester, $1.00 ; Stewarton, $10.00 ; Hawktsbury, St. Paul's, $5.00. 

Presbytery of Lanark and Renfrew. — Douglas and Scotch Bush, $7.00 j 
Arnprior, St. Andrew's, $25.00 ; Carleton Place, Zion, $18.00 ; Burnstown, $4.00 ; 




f i 






h <i 




Beiikwith, $.">.()i); Si'otlaiul, Micksburfj, rtc, *7.*J') : .Mi<MI»'ville, 8t. Paul's, 11.00; 
D.irliiif,'. St. I'. Icr's, $1.(M, ; Alriioiil*-, St. Andrew s. *•"».()(» ; Hrij^litsiflc iiiid Itnl- 
bouHir, .flO.OO ; Hi'iiclitxuf?, *4.(M) ; I'aki'iiliiiiii, St. .Viidrew's, * l.i)() ; IVrllt, Knox, 
$li'> 00 ; Cailc'tdii IMiue, St. Andrew's, *l". (»0 ; Lanark. St. Andrew's, #8.00; 
Smith's Falls, St. I'aul's, *2r>.(»(» ; Clayton, *ll.OO; Hlakeney. $10.00; Castifronl, 
$8.00 : Smith's Falls, St. Andn \vs, *:,'.').()() ; KentVew, St. Andrew's, $50.00 ; l^gau- 
villc and Lake Doie, *8.00 • Almonte, St. John's, $13.00 ; Hathiirstand South Sher- 
brooke, $3.00. 

TaKSBYTERV OK BuocKViLLK. — Toledo, St. Andrew's, $5.00; Chesterville, 
$3.00; Hrockvi'le, Finst Church, $40.00; llcckbtoii, Jli.OO ; Kemptviile, .-jtlO.OO; 
Oxf<»rd IVlilKs, $4.00; Cardinal, $.").00 ; Maiusviile. $2.00; Soutn .Alountain, $4.00; 
Morewood, $4.00 ; Prescott, $8.00 ; Morrisburg, Knox, $5.00 ; Caintown, $12.00; 
Lyn, $28.00; Hroekville, St. John's, $25.00; Vank!.<'k Jlill, $10.00. 

PuKSiiYTKUY OF KJN(iST()N. — Poland. $4.00 ; Camden and Newb'irjjh, $5.00 ; 
Kingston. Chalmers, $105.00; Amherst lajand, $10.00; Belleville, Joliii St., 
$75.00; Kingston, Ceuke's. .$10.00; Lan.sdowne. Fairl'a.x and Sand Bay, $7.00; 
KingsLon, St. Andrew's, $200.00; Ernestown, $3.00; Hay Bay, $1.5(1; IJatli, 
$2.00; Sandhurst, $1.00; Napauee, $35.00; Collin's Bay. $2.25; Picton. .S.. 
Andrew's. $4.78 ; Matloc, St. Jolumba and St. Paul's, $20.00 : Sydenham. Knox, 
$2.00; Madoe, St. Peter's, $4.50 ; Bylstone, $().00 ; MeDtniald's Corners, $l:!.()o ; 
Elphin, $8.00; Snow Road, $10.00; Wet-ti)ort and Xewboro', $5.00; King-ton, 
Zion. $10.00; (rananoq,.-, St. Andrew's, $15; Stirling, St. Au<lr«'w's, $5.00; 
Deseronto, $1(5.25; Belleville, St. Andrew's, $30.00; Pittsburgh, St. Johns, 
$2.0>j ; Wolfe Island, St. Andrew's, $3.00 ; Trenton, $5.00 ; Koslin, Thurlow and 
Sidney, $5.00 , :\i-olrose, $3.00 ; Glenvale, Harrowsmith and Wilton, $10.00 ; 
Bumbrae, St. Andrew's, $17.55. 

I'liKsnvrKKY OK Whuby. — Fnniskillen and Cartwright, $18.00 ; Bowman- 
ville, St. Paul'.s $6.00; Cshawn, $12.00; Dunbarton, $4.00; Brougham. St. 
John's, $2.00; Pickering, St. Andre' 's, $4.00: Whitby, St. Andrew's. $10.00; 
Utica, $1.00: Newtonville, $3.00; Scarboro, Melville S.S., $12.00; Kindall, i)0 
cents; Orono. $2.00. 

PiiK-i'.viKKY OK Petkrborough. — Peterborough, St. Andrew's, $30.00; Camp- 
belli'ord, St. Andrew's, $24.00 ; Springville, $2.50 : Garden Hill, $1.00 ; Cold- 
.spiings. $5.00; (>ntreville,'$20.(A) • CVbourg, $20.00 ; Baltimore, $11.00 ; Omemee, 
Lakevale and Mount Pleasant, $5.')0 ; Havelock, $5.00. 

l'Ki-:si{Yi'KUY OF LiNiviAY. — Feueloii Falls, $5.00 ; Scott and Uxbri<lge, *!4.00 : 
Fenelon Falls and Soniervillo, $2.00 ; Lindsay, St. Andrew's, $9.03; < Jaiuebridge, 
$5.00; Uivl.udge, ^^0.00 ; Beaverton, Knox, $7.00 ; Eldon, St. Andrew's, $15.00 ; 
Bfca\erton. Si. Andrews. $22.00. 

Pki';si{ytkky ok Tohonto. — Toronto, St. Andrew's, $110.00 ; King. St. An- 
drew's, .v4().00 : Toronto. Old St. Andrew's. $154.00 ; Maple, $20.00 ; Scarboro. 
Knox, *8. 00; Scarboro. Zion, $6.00; Fi.sherville. $1.00 ; Scarboro, Knox S. S.. 
$5.00; Toronto, Erskine. $25.00; Toronto. Central, $30.00; Scarboro. St. An- 
drew's, $!I.OO; Limeiiou.se. $5.00; Streetsville, $3.00; Toronto. St. Fiio,hs. 
$5.00 ; Richmond Hill. $5.00 ; Thornhill, $3.00 ; Toronto, Bonar Church, $lo.0(» ; 
Toronto. Chalmers, $5.00; Georgetown, $5.00; Parkdale, Dunn Avenue, $20.00; 
Laskay. St. Parl's and West King, $2.00 ; Toronto, Cowan Avenue, $5.00. 

Pui:.?BYTKRY OF Orangkville. — Hlllsburgh, $3.00 ; Adjala. 50 cents ; Mono 
Mills. $1.00 ; Flesherton, Chalmers, $7.00 ; East Garafaxa, Bethel, $5.00 ; Black's 
Corners, $1.00 ; Erin, Burns Church, $2.00 ; Mono Centre, $1.00. 

Prksbytery of Barrie. — Parry Sound, $5.00 ; Creemore, St. Andrew's, 
$4.00 ; Oro, Guthrie, $5.00 ; Collingwood, $11.00 ; Essa First, Dunn's, $1.00 ; 
Essa First, Burns, ^1.00 ; Essa, First, $1.00 ; Oro, Central, $3.00 ; Duntroon, St. 
Paul's, $2.00 ; Orillia, «40.00 ; Elmvale, $5.00 ; Oro, St. Andrew's, $4.00. 

Presbytery of Algoma. — Thessalon, $1.00. 
fRESBYTERY' OK NoRTH Bay. — North Bay, St. Andrew's, $2.00. 
Presbytery of Owen Sound. — Holstein, $2.00 ; Wiarton, St. Paul's, $2.00. 
Presbytery of Sauqeen. — Cotswold $2,00. 



Vi 
gus, ftl 



^>ii I I I II lij _> IM I I'WIi I I iiH ij^tljWp^iJ ttjJJl 



.f!|.0.\- 

'i Sher- 



'10.00; 
*4.00; 
12.00; 

>.00; 

St., 
■AH); 

niitii, 

• St. 
Knox, 

■■).(»() ; 

and 
0.00: 



170 

Prrbbytery of OUKf-Pn. — Alrnn, $1.00 ; ErmoHft First riiiinli, $3.00 ; Fer- 
gu.i, St. Andrews, $10.00; Oiiolph, Chalnicr.^^, *,H.(»() ; FrrKHs, Mflvillc. *I0.()0 ; 
Gait, Knox, *;?.S.OO ; Lanrel, $1.00; RotliHaN . *.">.00 ; Acton, Kno.x, #."),00 ; (;alt, 
CcMitnil, $10.00 ; Flora, Chalniera, $.S.OO ; Waterloo, $1,00. 

Preshytkry of IlAMtr/roN. — llumilton, Knox, $.'55.00; Hamilton, P!i-skipe, 
$10.00 ; Cayi'K'i. <4.00 ; St. Catharines, Knox, $19.00 ; Siincoe, St. I'a.il .s, 17.00 ; 
Colquhoun, $2.35 ; Dunbar, $5.00 ; Caledonia, $5.00 ; West Fhunboro, $r).()0 ; 
Hamilton, St. John's, $15.00 ; Hamilton, St. Paul'H, $70.00 ; Weanisville, $5.00 ; 
Abingdon, $2.00 ; Binbrook, $4.00 ; Clinton, $2.00 ; Hamilton, Wentwortb, $.'',.00 ; 
Dundas, Knox, $21.00. 

Prkshytkry of Paris. — Embro, Knox, $30.00; Brantford, Zion, $25.00; 
Brantford, First Churoh, $5.00 ; Woodstock, Knox, $25.00 ; Brookton, $.'5.00. 

Pricsbytery of London. — St. Thomas, Knox, $50.00 ; Fiiif,'al. $10.00 ; Lon- 
don, St. Andrews, $20.00 ; Dunwich, Chalmers, $3.00 ; London, Chahn. r.s, $2.00; 
Caradoc, Cook's, $5.00; Hyde Park, 2.5e ; Gleucoe, $5.00; Dunwich. Duff's 
Church, .$3.25: London, Knox, $6.00 ; Lakcview, $1.25; Uutton, Knox, $10.00; 
Mosa, Burns Church, $5.50. 

Prksuytery of ("hatham. — Bethel, Bridge End and Kidge, $3.00; (^hat- 
ham, St. Andrew's, $10.00 ; Chatham, First Church, $5.00 ; Tilbury Fast, $10.00. 

Presbytery of Stratford. — Atwood, $1.75 ; St. Mary's, First Church, 
$5.00 ; Logan, St. Paul's and Monkton, Knox, $6.00. 

Puksbytery of Huron. — Brucefield Union, $5.00 ; Grand Bend, 
Goderich, Knox, $15.00 ; Smith's Hill, $2.00 ; Blyth, St. Andrew's, $;',.00. 

Presbytery of Maitland. Belgrave, Knox, $2.00 ; Kincardine, 
$5.00. 

Presbytery of Bruce. — ^Tiverton, $7.00; Teeawater, $10.00; We.st Brant, 
$2.00 ; Chesley, Geneva Church, $5.00. 

PRESHvrERY OF Sarnia. — West Williami, $5.00 ; Petroiia. $10.00 ; Sarnia, 
St. Andr.-y s. $22.00 ; Watford, $1.00 ; Alvinston, Guthrie, $5.00 ; Oil City, $5.00 ; 
South Plynipton, $2.00. 

Presbytery of Mi.xedosa, Man. — Fairraount and Cadurcis, $(5.00. 

Presbytery of Hegina. — Oxbow, Assa., $6.00 

Pre-sbytery of Kamloops— Trail, B. C, Knox S. S., $10,00; Kaslo, St. 
Andrew's, $10.00 ; Ve.'non, First Church, $3.00 ; Rossland, $15.00 ; Nelson, $5.00. 

Presbytery of Victoria. — Alberni, $5.00. 

Rev. R. Cliambers, Burdzag, Turkey, $10.00. 

L H. N.. 50o. 



$2.00; 
Knox, 



BURSARY AND SCHOLARSHIP FUND. 
Receipts. 



Balance from last year 
Loan returned 



$49 18 

85 00 



Balance on hand 



$134 16 



Kingston, May lat., 1900. 



JOHN McINTYRE. 

Treasurer. 



180 



.:i 



KEPOUT OF 



THE BOARD OF MANAGEMENT OF 
KNOX COLLEGE. 



'•■ .'J 




. V 




The Board of Management of Knox College renpectfully preHenta to tho UenerHl 
Assemblv its fifty-aixth annual report, and also transmits the report of the Senate, tut- 
ting forth the work of the Faculty and students during the past sesiton. 

Sixty-tive students were enrolled in the Theological Classes during thd pant seseion, 
and twenty-three of these graduated at the close of the Academic year. Sixteen Ktudents 
took, during the past session, their second and third years in the Preparatory Courso 
under the old system. As this Course has, under the new regulations of the Assembly 
been discontinued, except for the benefit of those who had entered it under former con- 
ditions, no new students have been admitted into this department. Provision was made 
during the last session for the instruction of the students of the second and third yearn 
in this Course. For the next session, however, the Board will be called on to provide 
only for those who, last session, were in the second year, but will then be in the Kiiul 
year. All students before entering the Theological Course will hereafter be re(iuired to 
take a Degree in Artn, or a somewhat modified University Course. The Board hopes 
that students will, as far as possible, proceed to a University Degree before entering on 
their Theological studies. 

The total receipts from Endowment and Congregational contributions have been 
$17,104.27, while the disbursements have amounted to $17,049.'25, leaving an apparent 
bal.'vnce of $55.02 in the hands of the Treasurer. Accounts which were unfortunately 
delayed in being rendered at the time when the books were closed, and which have since 
been sent to the Tre.'iurer, have changed this surplus into a deficit of upwards <>f .^oOO. 

The Board observes with deep regret the decrease of congregational contributi'>ns, 
which, combined with the continued fall in the rate of interest produced by investment?, 
seriously diminishes the revenue of the College. The Board cannot refrain from expresH- 
ing its surprise that upwards of three hundred congregations seem to think it unneces- 
sary for them to contribute anything for Theological education. 

During the past year the Board has received $1,000 from the executors of the late 
Hon, M. C. Cameron, for the establishment of a Scholarship in memory of a deceased 
son, and a like sum from Mr. David Morrice for a similar purpose. The fall in the rate 
of interest har seriously affected the fund for the payment of scholarships, and unless it 
be considerably increased the Board will be compelled to reduce the amount of many of 
them. 

The (juestion of the appointment of another Professor has occupied the careful 
attention of the Board. It was hoped that it would have been possible for the Board to 
have reported to the Assembly, that tiuiincial arrangements had been made for the 
establishment of a new Chair, but unforseen difficulties having arisen, through vexatious 
litigation, payment of a becjuest left the College for that purpose has been delayed. 
Two suits affc;;ting this bequest have been successfully disposed of, and there is every 
reason to suppose that a similar result will be obtained in the case of the third and last 
action. As the income for the support of the Chair expected to arise from this bequest 
will not thus be immediately available, the Board cannot proceed towards taking action 
for an immediate appointment, but respectfully asks the consent of the Asse- bly to the 
appointment of a new Professor being made by the Board before the beginning of next 
Session, should circumstances warrant it— subject to the ultimate approval of the 
General Assembly. The Board feels that the duty assumed by Professor Ballantyne of 
teaching both Church History and Apologetics is too heavy a burden to be imposed on 
him, and recommends that on the establishment of a new Chair a readjustment of the 
professorial duties be made. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 



WM. MORTIMER CLARK, 

Chairman. 



Toronto, May S9th, 1900. 



N. Carr.j 
\\.\., A. 
Robert 
li.A.. Wl 
B.A., nI 
Taylor, 



181 



RKPORT OP THE SENATE OP KNOX CoLLEOE : SESSION 1899-1900. 



K •et- 



The following are the nAinea of thu atiidonta enrolled in the loveriil yean, in Theolof^jy : 

77(i(ti lV(«r— Willi»m Beattie, W. J. Hooth, Henry Broad, I'. W. Currie, (J. M. Dunn, 
U.J. KUiHon, R. F. Hall, J. F. Johnston, (ieor^e Keiidull, William J. Knox, M.A., 
N. H. MoOillivray, A. W. Mclntimh, I. W. Macnamara, Hugh Mathenon, V.,h Maxwell, 
I'eter Reith, William Boyd Ronald, B.A., R. S. Scott, Marlow Alexander Shaw, M.A., 
.VIexander W. Shepherd, A. 0. Wiahart, b.A., Frank Sydney Wrinch, M.A. 

Hecond Yenr—W. A. Bremner, Jamea Herbert Bruce, B.A., R. H. Carlyle, William 
N. Carr, Richard Allan Crannton, B.A., Robert Wilson Craw, B.A., Richard Davidson, 
15. A., A. W. Hare, Frank Cecil Harper, B.A., J. J. Haatie, James Howard Lemon, B.A., 
Robert J. McAlpine, B.A., Malcolm MoArthur, R. C. McDermid, Donald McKerroll, 
n.A., W.C. Mercer, Hugh Munro, B.A., Henry James Pritchard, B.A.. W.G. Russell, 
B.A., Norman Robert Douglas Sinclair, B.A., Murray C. Tait, B.A., Thomas Wardlaw 
Taylor, B.A., Ph.D., James A. Wilson, B.A. 

Fint Year—U. E. Abraham, B.A., A. L. Buroh, B.A., D. G. Campbell, D. J. 
Davidson, A. L.Harvey, B.A., A. L. Howard, Oillies Eadie, A. J. Hunter, B.A., M.B., 
J. A. Miller, T. O. Miller, J. J. Monds, B.A., W. M. Morris, A. H. MacLeod, J. L. 
Mcpherson, E. G. Robb, B.A., S. T. Steele, M. Telford, James A. Whillans, W. G. 
Wilson. 

Six of these students have not yet completed the year, havinf( taken only certain 
subjects, under the system of University options. 

The following summary of the Class Reports is given : 

Dr. Gdcen conducted the classes in New Testament Literature and Exegesis, and in 
Biblical Criticism. In the fortuor of these subjects the Senior Classes (Second and Third 
Years) heard lectures in the first four chapters of the Epistle to the Hebrews and on va. 
1-8 of chapter vi. Lectures in Introduction to thu Epistles to the Romans, Corinthians 
(I. and II.), and Galatians, were delivered to the Senior Class. The Greek Critical Exer- 
cises of the Second Year were examined and criticised. The Senior Class prepared the 
twalve first chapters of Hebrews for examination in Translation and Grammar. 

The Junior Class read critically in the Gospel of John, chs. iv. : 130, and prep-^red 
for examination in Translation and Graninmr chs. i.-xii. A series of lectures on ti*'. 
principles and history of Scripture Interpretation was delivered to this Class. The Mon- 
day lecture of each week was devoted to the subject of Biblical Criticism— dealing chiefly 
with the sources and history of the Text of the Old Testament and the New. 

Dr. MacLaren, as in former sessions, conducted the Classes in Systematic Theology. 
The Senior Class, consisting of the students of the Second and Third Years, met four hours 
weekly and heard lectures on the Decrees of God, Creation, Providence, the Origin of 
the Human Race, Trichotomy, Man's Original State, the Covenant of Works, the Fall, 
Original Sin, the Covenant of Grace, the Person of Christ, His Prophetic and Priestly 
Oflices, including under the latter a partial view of the necessity of an Atonement. The 
Confession of Faith, chs. viii.-xix., were carefully analyzed and studied in class, and Dr. 
A. A. Hodge's "Outlines,", pp. 200-514, were prescribed for study. 

The Junior Class (First Year) met three hours weekly and heard lectures on the In- 
spiration of Scripture, the Rule of Faith, the Attributes of God, and the Doctrine of the 
Trinity. The Confession of Faith, chs. i.-ix., was analyzed and studied in the Class. 
This Class, also, had prescribed for study Dr. A. A. Hodge's "Outlines," pp. 65-199. 
The attendance of the students was generally good, and their deportment excellent. 

Dr. Proudfoot delivered thirty-two lectures in Church Government, and ten lectures 
in Pastoral Theology to students of the Second and Third Years. He heard and criticised 
forty-three discourses of students of the same years ; in this way teaching Practical Homi- 
letics, and devoting to that subject as much time as was given to Church Government 
and Pastoral Theology. He also prescribed Texts to students ot the Second Year. Dr. 
Proudfoot, further, heard and criticised ten discourses by students of the First Year, who 
voluntarily gave afternoon hours for that purpose. 

Professor Ballantyne reports that in Church History the Senior Class studied the 
history of the Reformation in Great Britain and Ireland. The leading features of Mod- 





Il 

h • 1 



182 

ern Church History "ere likewise discussed, with special reterences to the churches of 
Scotland and Engliind. To the Junior Class lectures were given on the history of the 
Church during the first eight centuries ; the Apostolic period received special attention 
in this course. Fisher's History of the Christian Church was prescribed as a text-book 
in both classes, and the courses were conducted by means of recitation, discussion and 
lecture. 

Ill Apologetics, the Senior Class met once a week for the study of Anti-Christian 
Systems of Religion. De la Saussaye's Manual was used as a text-book, and lectures 
were given on the subject, following the outline indicated in the text-book. Emphasis 
was laid upon recitation in discussion in carrying on the work of this class. 

Proffusor McFadi/fn reports that the Senior Class m.et three times a week and heard 
lectures on the Canon of the Old Testament, and on Introduction to Rosea. This book 
was read and taken up exegetically in the class. 

Every member of the Third fear wrote a Critical Exercise on some passage of the 
Old Testament. 

In addition to the terminal examinations, a written examination on the work done 
during the former part of the session was held in January. 

The Junior Class met three times a week, heard lectures on Hebrew Grammar and 
Syntax, and on Introduction to the Psalter. Certain Psalms and a small portion of 
Deuteronomy were read exegetically. In addition to the terminal examination, in this 
class also a written examination was held towards the end of December, and weekly exer- 
cises wore written. 

Elocntiiin was taught during the first term by Professor William Houston, M.A., as 
substitute for J. W. Bengough, Esq., who had again been invited by the Senate, as 
authorized by the College Board, to conduct this department. During the second term 
Mr. Bengough was in charge of the class in Elocution. 

Mr. Houston dealt chiefiy with the subjor ts of Voice Culture and Articulation, his 
lectures being introductory to those of Mr. Bengough, who was mainly occupied in teach- 
ing the principles of Reading and Public Speaking, and in exercising the students in both. 

In commencing his work, Mr. Bengough announced to the students his purpose to 
give them marks in accordance with their work done in the class from week to week, in- 
stead of defining their standing by means of a final examination. The students were 
required to prepare brief compositions, which they delivered in the class, while they were 
also practiced in delivery and reading of selections in the various kinds of 1 ;,erature. Mr. 
Bengough remarks rhat the emphasizing of the importance of a good litera y style is essen- 
tial in the training of those whose work will largely consist in public speaking. 

I'REPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 







;i*-- 



In accordance with the action of the General Assembly in 1898, abolishing the Pre- 
paratory Course and substituting for it a three years' course, to be .taken wholly at <i 
Un'versity, no students were admitted thia session into the first Preparatory year. It 
was necessary, however, that provision should be made for conducting the classes of the 
Second and Third Year. The classes in Greek and Latin were taught by Mr. Walter A. 
Findlay, B.A., and the class in English %y the Re". George A. Fasken, B.A. 

Third Yeav—W. W. Aitcheson, K. W. Barton, J. Burkholder, J.G. Cheyne, D. H. 
Curry, J. A. James, H. Konkle, D. McKay, R. McKenzie, A. McTaggart. 

Second Y^'ur—A. J. Campbell, D. T. McClintock, Thomas McCord, Alexander 
McLean, John Walker, William R. Wood. 

Angus Roebuck attended the classes of the Second Year for several weeks, but seri- 
ous illness caused him to withdraw. H. B. Kitchen and R. B. Nelles, who gave atten- 
dance last ye.ir, are now taking the University Course. 

F. J. H. Bennett, a very promising student of last year's Junior Class, met his 
death, by accident, in September last, while on his Mission field in British Columbia. 
Mr. Bennett had done exceptionally good work on the Home Mission, and was greatly 
beloved by all who knew him. 

In Greek and Latin the entire work prescribed in the Calendar was overtaken. Each 
student was re(iuired to translate or explain a passage at each meeting of the class. All 
students were required to do some Prose Composition each week, and Grammar was care- 
fully dealt with. The students of two years were combined in these subjects, and they 
met ninety times during the session. Attendance w.-^s very satisfactory. 

The class in English met twice weekly throughout the session, and a few additional 



■^^•^i^ai^sn:^ 



188 

meetings were held. The entire work prescribed was overtaken, and a few selections 
from authors contemporary with Shakespeare and with Macaulay were read ; each stu- 
dent was re(juired to write eleven ossays, which were discussed in the class. This exer- 
cise proved of much value. Mr. Fasken expresses entire satisfaction with the diligence 
of the students and their desire to take advantage of all opportunities afibrded by the 
class. 

During the session Mr. Fasken met twice a week with a student whose knowledge 
of Greek was defective, and carefully drilled him in Greek Grammar. This student had 
been entrusted to his tutorage by the Senate. 

The students of the Second and Third Preparatory Years, attended the C'asses in Uni- 
versity College, and the University of Toronto the Classes in English, History, Jjogic, 
Psychology and Hebrew, as re<iuired in these years respectively. 

THK LIBRARY. 

The Rev. William Mc William, LL.li., Librarian, reports that the Library has, during 
the past year, been used by students of the College and ministers of the Church to about 
the same extent as in previous years. A number of books have been presented to the lib- 
rary by friends of the College. Among these gifts, special mention should be made of lOli 
volumes from the library of the late Rev. Andrew Wilson, which were presented by his 
family. In all, over 400 volumes have been added to the library during the year now 
closing. 

There has also been procured during the year (and paid for out of a special fund) a 
cabinet library register and card catalogue, which will prove a great convenience to those 
using the library. More than 2,000 volumes have already been catalogued, and the 
librarian hopes, during the summer vacation, to make good progress with the rest of the 
library. 

COLLEGK S0CI£XIE8. 



The Litei-anj and Tliexlwjh-al Socichj, of which Mr. N. H. McGillivray was President, 
met weekly for literary and elocutionary culture. Mr. H. Munro, B. A., has been chosen 
President for 1900-1. 

Mr. .J. W. Macnamara was President of the Ctllege Missionary Society. The opera- 
tions of the Society extended from Ontario to British Columbia, and were carried on vith 
much enthusiasm and with excellent results. The Society labors in fields which are set 
apart for it — usually fields of a new and difficult character. There is probalily no agency 
of the Church which accomplishes as much as the Students' Missionary Societies of the 
several Colleges, with revenues so limited. These Societies, therefore, have very strong 
claims upon the sympathy and support of the Church. 

Last year the Knox College Missionary Society was represented in the field by twenty- 
seven labourers. This year an equal number have been appointed. The officers of the 
Society for 1900-1 are: W. A. Bremner, I'resident; S. H. Bruce, B.A., and H. J. 
Pritchard, B.A., Vice-Presidents; A. J. Hunter, B.A., M.B.^ Recording Secretary ; A. 
L. Burch, B.A., Financial Secretary ; J. J. Monds, B.A., Treasurer ; W. G. Wilson, 
B. A., Correspoi,ding Seci tary ; J. L. McPherson, Secretary of Committee. 

Saturday conferences of Professors and students were held as in previous Sessions,. 
their main purpose being the promotion of spiritual life in the College. The Senate is 
very grateful to the Rev. Dr. Potts, the Rev. Armstrong Black, and Mr. P. H. Burton, 
for valuable addresses given at meetings of the conference. 

The Senate has pleasure in reporting that five candidates for the degree of B. D. 
will write in the examinations in the First Department, appointed to begin on May 7th, 
The final examinations have been completed by Rev. Harry McCuUoch, B.A., and Fred 
Barron, B.A., and the degree conferred upon them. 

The degree of Doctor of Divinity has been conferred upon the Rev. Robert Peter 
McKay, B.A., Foreign Mission Secretary of the Church. 



I.-: 



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184 





I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

■VII. 

VIII. 



I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 



I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND PHIZES IN THEOLOGY. 

First Year. 

Central CImrch, Hamilton Scholarship, $60. . E. Q. Robb, B.A. 

St. James' S(). Church, Toronto " 60. . A. J. Hunter, B.A., M.B. 

Eastman " 60.. H. E. Abraham, B.A. 

John King " 60. . /T. O. Miller. 

Bloor St. Ohuu:h, Toronto " 50. . \j. J. Monds, B.A. 

Goldie " 40.. /A. L. Burch, B.A. 

Gillies (I) .. " 30.. \ W. M. Morris. 

Qillies{IT) " 30.. Not awarded. 

Second Year. 

Elizabeth Scott Scholarship, $75. . Richard Davidson, B.A. 

Knox Church, Toronto (I) ... . " 60.. James H. Lemon, B.A. 

K7WX Church, Torotito (II). . . " 60. . f H. J. Pritchard, B.A. 

Loghrin " 50. . \ W. G. Russell, B.A. 

Jane Mortimer " 50. . /Frank C. Harper, B.A. 

Boijd " 30. . IN. R. D. Sinclair, B.A. 

Dunbar " 30. . James H. Bruce, B.A. 

Third Year. 

Bonar-Burns Scholarship, $80. . A. W. Mcintosh. 

Fisher (I) " 60.. J. W. Macnamara. 

Fisher (11) " 60.. Hugh Matheson. 

R. H. Thornton, (Memorial). . " 60. . /F. J. Maxwell. 

Heron " 30. ."IR. S. Scott. 

Cheyne " 30. . A. C. Wishart, B.A. 



SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES. 

First Year, 




Bayne Scholarship, $50 : for Proficiency in Hebrew on entering Theology. — E. G. 
Robb, B.A. 

First and Second Years. 

The Prince of Wales' Prize, $60 : Essay on "The Ethical Results of Pantheism.' — 
Hugh Munro, B.A. 

Second and 'Diird Years. 

Smith Scholarship, $50 ; Essay on "The Realization af God's Love as an Element in 
Christian Experience." — Not competed for. 

Brydon Prize, $30 : Special Examination on " The Effect of Calvinism on the Re- 
ligious Life." s 

First, Second and Third Years. 

Clark Prize, (I), Lange's Commentary : for New Testament Greek. — Frank C. Har- 
per, B.A. 

Clark Prize, (TI), Lange's Commentary : for Old Testament Hebrew. — H. J. 
Pritchard, B.A. 

John Fenwick Prize, $20: for Essay on " Confirmations of Scripture from Recent 
Discoveries in Egypt." — Frank C. Harper, B.A. 



aMMMi 



185 



UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS. 



Second Year. 

I. Kilgour Scholarship, $50 : E. A. Coffin. 

II. Westminster Church Scholarship, $40. 

The following Scholarships were awarded to students preparing for Theology in Knox 
College who have the highest standing in the Oriental Department of University College, 
Toronto. 

I. Archibald McArthur Scholarship, $60 : Gillies Eadie. 

II. McClure Scholarship, $45, name not reported. * 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WM. CAVEN, 

Chairman of Senate. 



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186 



MANITOBA COLLEGE. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF MANAGEMENT FOR 18991900. 

The Board of Management has pleasure in submitting its Twenty-eightli Annujil 
Report, and in transmitting the Report of the Senate. 

The last General Assembly appointed the Rev. Dr. Kilpatrick, of Aberdeen, as pro- 
fessor of Systematic Theology and Apologetics, and joint lecturer in Philosophy. Dr. 
Kilpatrick entered upon his duties in October, and lectured in Philosophy till Christmas. 
When the summer session opened in April, he took up the work allotted to him in the 
Theological department, and is now carrying on his classes. 

The choice of a Principal for the College to tike the place left vacant by the removal 
of the venerated Dr. King, was left unsettled by the last General Assembl), and the 
question engaged the earnest consideration of the Board. In October it was unanimously 
decided to recommend the appointment of the Rev. William Patrick, D.D., minister of 
St. I'aul's Free Church, Dundee. This recommendation was transmitted to the General 
Assembly's commission which had been named to deal with such nomination, and the 
appointment was unanimously made by the commission in February. Dr. Patrick 
accepted the pu.sition and was inducted into office on April 12th, as Principal of the 
College and Prnl'vssor of Old and New Testament Exegesis. It is a matter of great grati- 
fication to the Board that its proceedings in this matter wei'e marked by such harmony 
and cordiality, that so suitable a man has been secured for this responsible position, and 
that he has entered upon his work under such auspicious circumstances. 

The number of regular students enrolled in Tlieology for the current session is thirty- 
one. In addition to these, Mr. Robert Boyle, who took the first part of his examination 
as an ex?ia mural student last year, ha.s recently passed the second |)art of the same. 
The total number of Arts students during the winter was 147. 

Details regarding the work done in Theology and in Arts will be found in the Report 
of the Senate. 

A statement of the financial standing of the College, duly audited, is presented here- 
with. 

The contributions to the College from the North-West and from British Columbia 
show a gratifying advance, and it is to be expected that with increasing numljers and 
increasing ability, the West will bear annually an increasing share of the financial support 
of the College, but the current expenses have had a heavy strain ]>ut upon them by the 
appointment of an additional and much-needed professor, and it i.s hoped that the help 
of the older provinces so generously given hitherto, will be continued till the gradual 
growth of the home revenue balances the increased expenditure. The congregational 
contributions from the Provinces of Ontario and (^Juebec amount to 82,.'^;"). 99, a shortage 
of $142 as compared with last year. The Synod of the Maritime Provinces has gener- 
ously sent us an annual contribution of $500 for several years, but for the year now 
chising only .?24.'i has been leceived. We are encouraged i:o h(.ie that their gift will yet 
be supplemented to the usual amount. 

Continued thanks are due to the Presbyterian Church in Ireland for a repetition of 
its nontrihution of £100, and to Mrs. Barbour, of Bonskeid, for a gifr. of £20 to the 
Scholarship Fund. We regret to say that the Church of Scotland has been compelled, 
by a deficiency in its Colonial Mission Fund, to discontinue its annua! appropriation of 
£50 as well as to reduce its assistance to our Home Mission work. 

The Board expresses its gratification that the increase in the in.fesHoriate has rend- 
ered possible a re-arrangement of the Theological curriculum, and r.el'.eves that the cur- 
riculum, as submitted by the Faculty to the Senate, and cordially adopted by that body, 
will meet with the approbation of all conversant with the wants of 'he College. 

The Board reports with gratitude that sums of money have been received to endow 
two scholarships in the Theological department — one a contribution of $1,000 from the 
estate of the late Principal King to perpetuate a scholarship which he had given annually 



^utt^^imm 



mmmm 



187 



in memory of his son, John Kalph King ; another, a like sum from the Niebet Academy 
Fund ill memory uf the valuable work of the Rev. .James Nisbet, our first missionary to 
the Indians. The Rev. Charles W. iJordon, of Winnipeg, and Dr. Gilbert Gordon, of 
Toronto, have conil)iiied to give SoO a year as a scholarship in memory of their mother. 
This was awarded for the first time last September, and l)ear8 the name of the Mary 
Roliertson Gordon sclKilarship. St. Andrew's Church, Winnipeg, through the Kev. 
Joseph Hoirg, has oH'ered a prize of $2~> f f r the best examination on the " Hules and 
Forms of Procedure." The thanks of the Board are also due to the (io\ornor-(jieneral 
for a Ijronze medal, to the Lieutenant-Governor of Manitoba for a silver medal, and to 
the Alma Mater Society of the College for a gold medal. 

A beginning has l)een made during the past year in establishing in the convocation 
hill! of the College a portrait gallery of the men who have rendered distinguished service 
to tlie College and to the Presbytprian Church in the West. The first picture to be hung 
was that of the late Principal, Dr. King, presented by women of the city of Winnipeg 
who had attended his lectures on Tennyson's In Mi'murinm. This was followed by a 
portrait of Dr. Robertson, the Superintendent of Missions, presented by ministerial and 
other friends in the North- West and British Columbia. 

Til reference to the matters referred to t'. i Boards of the several Colleges by the last 
(ieneral Assembly (minutes, page (12), this Board begs to slate : 

First, That it recognizes the importance and desirability of having a uniform stand- 
ard throughout the whole Church, and it therefore approves of the scheme adopted by 
the General Assembly to establish an Arts course which shall (jualify a man to enter on 
the study of Theology at a stage one year short oi that re((uired for che degree of B. A. 

Second, As regards ([uestions numbers 2 and .'i, since they do not apply to Manitoba 
College in its present circumstances, the Board has not given them any considerable 
degree of attention, and asks to be excused from answering them. 

During the year valuable additions of books have been made to the library at a cost 
of nearly §500. Three hundred and twenty-eight volumes have been added by purchase, 
chiefly in the department of English literature. Numerous gifts of books have been 
received. In particular, thanks are due to the Rev. William Dewar, B.A., for 127 
volumes ; to Mrs. Walker, widow of the Rev. William Walker, of Chatham, for forty- nine 
volumes ; and to Sir Thomac VV. Taylor for nineteen volumes and thirty-five pamphlets. 



All of which is respectfully submitted, 



Winnipen, M<ty 19tli, 1900. 



COLIN H. 



CAMPBELL, 

Chdinnan, 



: M 



REPORT OF THE SENATE OF MANITOBA COLLEGE FOR THE YEAR 

1899-1900. 



The Senate of Manitoba College submits to the General Assembly the following 
report regarding the work of the year. That work has been carried on continuously since 
the date of the last report, with the exception of a period of ten days last September, and 
for a portion of the time in April and May the Theological classes and Arts classes mot 
simultaneously. 

I. THEOLOOY. 

As was stated in last year's report, which was prepared after the beginning of the 
summer session, much valued assistance in the regular class work in Theology was baing 
given by the Rev. Principal Mac Vicar and the Rev. Dr. Scrimger of Montreal. The Hev. 
Dr. Gordon, of Halifax, gave similar help during the latter part of he session. Special 
series of lectures outside of the regular course were given in the course of the session by 
the Rev. Dr. Iverach, of Aberdeen, on "Theism in its Relation to Modern Science and 
Philosophy," by the Rev. Dr. John C. Gibson, of Swatow, China, on " Missiimary Prob- 
lems and Methods," and by the Rev. Dr. T. M. Hamill, of Belfast, on the "Fatherhood 
of(iod." 



188 




if ., i 



ill 



m- 





i, 

3 \V 



The death of Dr. Kin^^ left the regular staff in Theology with only one member, 
Rev. Professor Baird ; and hence it was necessary , as may be seen from the list given 
above, to invite a larger number of visiting professors than in any previous session. The 
thanks of the Synod are due to these gentlemen for their valuable and freely given 
assistance. 

The work of the current session "t being carried on mainly by the members of the 
regular staff in the faculty of Theology, now happily increased to three. The Principal 
is lecturing on the Book of Amos in the department of Old Testament Literature, and on 
the Gospel of Mark in the department of New Testament Literature. At a later stage in 
the session the other subjects embraced in the work of the chair will be taken up. 

Professor Baird is lecturing on Church History, treating of the Reformation and 
Modern Church History. He is teaching also the Junior Class in the Hebrew langua^'e. 

Dr. Kilpatrick, in his class in Systematic Theology, is treating of the doctrine of the 
Person of Christ, firstly, as presented in the Gospel narratives and especially in His own 
testimony regarding Himself, and secondly, an exposition of the doctrine. The class in 
Apologetic will take up the same theme — the Person of Christ — but it will be discussed 
from the point of view of defence. A short aeries of studies in New Testament Ethic as 
rooted in the Person and Work of Christ will also be given. 

Three short series of lectures on subjects in the line of Practical Training have also 
been arranged for. Dr. Kilpatrick is now dealing with the " Conduct of Public Worship," 
Dr. Patrick will follow with a course on "The Sacraments and Church Law," and Pro- 
fessor Baird will discuss "Organizfition and Parochial Work." 

Arrangements have been made, as in former years, for assistance from teachers not 
belonging to the College stttff. The Rev. R. G. Murison, M.A., Lecturer in Oriental 
Literature in University College, Toronto, will give a short course of lectures on the his- 
tory of Egypt, Assyria and Babylonia, especially in their relation to contemporary Israel, 
and will also lecture on Hebrew Exegesis. The Rev. Dr. Wright, of Portage la Prai-ie, 
will give a short series of lectures on Homiletics. 

l-.^X^The enlargement of the staff has led to a revision of the curriculum, and a redistri- 
bution of subjects. The subjects to be taught by Dr. Patrick are those which are 
included under the general title of Old and NewTesUim^nt Literature, viz.: the Exegesis 
of the Old Testament, the Exegesis of the New Testament, Biblical Theology, Introduc- 
tion, and the History of Old Testament and New Testament times. Professor Baird s 
work covers the field of Church History, including in addition to that which is always 
covered by such a title. The History of Doctrine and Symbolics. Professor Baird also 
gives teaching in the Hebrew language. Dr. Kilpatrick's work covers the subjects of 
Systematic Theology, Apologetic and Christian Ethic. Much attention has been given to 
this re-arrangement, and the Senate believes that the curriculum adopted is in full har- 
mony with the theological requirements of the day, and it is confident that the various 
subjects embraced in it will be effectively taught. 

The General Assembly will, as the Senate believes, note with satisfaction that not 
only is theoretical instruction amply provided for, but that special attention is given to 
training the students in their future duties, such as the reading of the Scriptures, the 
conduct of public worship, the administration of the Sacraments, deali*-^ with enquirers, 
the visitation of the sick, and the management of business in the scasion, deacon's court 
and Presbytery. The method followed is analogous to clinical instruction in medicine, 
and the work is chiefly done by the students themselves. 

The revision of the curriculum and representations made to us have led us to request 
the theological faculty to consider and report upon the existing B.D. regulations, with a 
v'ew to their improvement. We hope to publish the new regulations which we may adopt 
in the forthcoming calendar. It is our (ionviction that while maintaining and even raising 
the standard of schok.rship required for the degree, we may induce a much larger number 
of our graduates to offer themselves as candidates. 

The students of Theology now in attendance are as follows : 

III. Year— Wesley Akitt .T. A. Beattie, B.A., W. F. Gold, G. C. Grant, W. J. 
Inglis, B.A., D.ivid Lang, B.A., R. A. Lundy, R. C. Pollock, A. M. Skead, John Smith, 
J.G. Stephens, W. B. Tate, J. H. Wallace, B.A. 

II. Year — J. A. Cormie, B.A., Hugh Hamilton, Andrew Little, J. R. McAllister, 
Samuel Lundie, B.A., R. J. Macpherson, B.A., H. J. Robertson, J. W. Stephen, W. 0. 
Rothney. 



189 

I. Yevr— 0. L. Foote, B.A., Tiios. Kirkpifcrick, J. F, Millar, B.A., F, Mclnnes 
Ri)bt. McMiliaK, B.A., M. J. Macpherson, J. G. Raid, D. A. Stewart, B.A., Harry 
Walker. 

Extra Mural — Robert Boyle. 

Scholarships were awarded as follows at the close of the last summer session in 

Theology : 

III. YEAR. 

The Robt. Carswell Scholarship, $70 D. L. Gordon, B. A. 

" Robt. Anderson 50 /Joseph Ball. 

" Mrs. Barbour 30 \ J. R. Robertson, B. A. 

" Mrs. Barbour 2ad prize 20 L. S. Hall. 

II. YEAR. 

The Robt. Carswell Scholarship, $70 D. K. Grant, M.A. 

" Robt. Crawford " 50 D. Lang. B.A. 

" Ruth Russell Winchester " 40 J.E.Hogg. 

" Mary Ferine Tait " 40 J.G.Stephens. 



■mi"** 



I. YEAR. 

The John Ralph King Scholarship, $()0 R. .T. Macpherson, B.A. 

" Mrs. Barbour " 50 T. W. Taylor, Ph.D. 

" Geo. R. Crowe " 50 / Hugh Hamilton. 

" John Black " 40 ' Geo. Yule. 

OPEN TO ALL THE YEARS. 

The Miry Robertson Gordon Scholarship, $50. . D. K. Grant, M.A. 

II. ARTS. 



One hundred and eight students of the College have presented themselves for the 
examinations of the University of Miinit()l)a, a larger number than ever before in the 
history of the College. Of these, twenty-five are members of the Senior B.A. class ; 
twenty-two belong to the Junior B.A. ; thirty-one to the Previous ; nineteen to the Ma- 
triculation ; ten to Matriculation Part I. ; and one to Medical entrance. The total num 
ber of Arts students enrolled during the session was 147. 

The names of the Senior B.A. students are as follows : 

W. J. Andrew, E. Beveridge, I. B. Bauson, R. A. Clackson, Jas. F. Creighton, 
Josephine M. Dickie, Jessie A. Falconer, Roderick Gillies, Hugh Hfimilton, Gertrude 
E. M. Henry, Fred Inglis, H. M. Irwin, Eleanor Jones, .J. Gertrv.de Kerr, M. Frances 
Logan, A. M. Matheson, A. O. Macdonald, Mary A. Matthev^ Robt. E. Pow, Hugh J. 
Robertson, Jas. G. Reid, J. G. Stephens, A. \V Sutherland, S. D. Wark, Hugh W. 
Watson. 

Dr. Bryce has taken the higher English classes, and has also conducted the depart- 
ment of Biology in the joint lectures arranged by the L^niversity of Manitoba. 

Prof. Hart has conducted the higher classes in French and part of those in Classics. 

Prof. Baird, from the New Year onward, lectured to the claases in Logic and I'olitical 
Economy, and also taught a class in German. 

Dr. Kilpatrick conducted a class in the department of Mental and Moral Science 
from October till Christmas. 

Mr. James, in addition to his usual duties as house master in the residence, taught 
some of the junior classes in Mathematics, and joined with the I'rofessors of St. John's 
College and Wesley College in teaching the united classes of the three Colleges in higher 
Mathematics. 



ii 'f 



Xi' Ml ' 

m 



m 









.)J; 




190 

Mr. Clark, as before, conducted junior claases in ClasnicH, and took part in the 
teaching of the Honour Clasaics. 

Dr. Manahan continued to take the greater part of the Phih>8oi)hy in the Honour 
Mental and Moral .Science course, and also assiHted with junior classes in Mathematic 
and History. 

Mr. Davis, as last year, taught junior classes and classes as high as the standard of 
the previous examination in the Department of Modern Lanj^uages. 

The Senate takes pleasure in acknowledging the debt of gratitude for thoroughness 
in teaching and for excellence in discipline which it owes to these younger members of 
the start' — Messrs. James, Clark, Davis, and Dr. Manahan. 

Co-operation with other Artt; Colleges in the city has been continued and extended. 
For several years the candidates in Honour Science from all theColleges have met togotiier 
and have been taught in common I >' thi three Professors from Manitoba, Wesley and St. 
John's Colleges, who ap| •^ion vork " ong themselves During the past year sinii 



r- 

i; 






' ,^e department of Mathematics. The arrange- 
\ Va esley College for joint teaching in the depart- 
^.nence and German, have been carried on to even a 



lar joint teaching has bee> i" ^ or 
ments between Manitoba 
ments of Classics, Mental ar 
greater extent than hitherto 

The students' societies, theological, i, issionary, literary, musical and athletic, and 
the Colhiji' Jourudl, have been in efl'ective operation, and have exercised a healthful intlu- 
ence during the year. 

The Senate acknowledges Nvith thankfulness the goodness of (Jod in the health vouch- 
safed to stafl' and students, in many other blessings temporal and spiritual, and not least 
in His guiding hand manifested in the transition which followed the death of the late 
Principal, Dr. King. 



All of which is respectfully submitted. 



Winnipetj, Maij 19th, 1900. 



\VM. PATRICK, 

Principal. 



KIN a: 



To Balanct 

o Congreg 

Ontil 

Mar| 

Personal 
Grant by tl 
Contributil 
Territ 
Interest oi 
Fees of St 



Salaries o 
Baird 
Salaries o 
Expenses 






ToB( 
Mrs. 
G. R 
Gord 
Inter 



s*;fc'i'3?;"*if^^* 



wmmm 



191 



FINANCIAL STATP]MENT OF MANITOBA COLLEGP:. FROM 
MAY 4th, 1891), TO MAY 4th, 1900. 




I. OKIik.NAKY Kt;NI>. 



Hecciptn. 

To Balance on hand May 4th, 1899 

" Congregational appropriationsandcoUectionB : 

Ontario and Quebec I^2,.'}45 99 

Maritime Provinces 24.'} 20 



Personal Donations by friends in Ontario and Quebec 

Grunt by the Presbyterian Church in Ireland (£100) 

Contributions of the Synods of Manitoba and North-West 

Territories, and of British Columbia 

Interest on Investments : 

Fees of Students in Arts and Hoard of Resident Students. . . . 



Total Receipts. 



Uiaburiiements. 

Salaries of Principal and Professors Bryce, Hart, 

Baird and Kilpatrick $8,«11 73 

Salaries of ^ ,-curers in Arts Department :{,800 0( 

Expenses (in part) of Summer Session 431 (iO 

Additions to Library and Journals for Reading 

Room 11494 .'« 

Priivting of Calendar, Postage, etc 27.'^ 20 

Furnishings for Residence $1.'U 2li 

Maintenance of Grounds, Plumbins; and Re[)airs o'M 07 



TH,\es and Insurance 

Interest on Miss Perine's donation according to agreement. . . 

l<\iel «980 50 

Water ISA 11 

Li<M .S82 18 



Supplies for Residence, and Wages of Matron and Servants. . 

Proportion of P]xpen.se8 in Toronto Office 

Contingent Fund 

Contributions to Removal Expenses of Principal and Dr. Kil- 
patrick 



Total Disbursements. 
Ry Fialance or. hand 



Total 



$82 62 



$2,589 19 
927 00 
490 00 




4,800 00 
4,li94 22 
7,7-17 11 






$21,237 52 




$21,320 14 




12,843 38 



7<)7 58 



«65 90 
115 41 
120 00 



1,495 79 

4,205 63 

120 00 

20O 00 

750 00 



$21,283 69 
36 45 

$21,. 320 14 



To Balance on hand, May 4th, 1899. 

Mrs. Barbour, Bonskied (£20j 

G. R. Crowe, Winnipeg 

Gordon Memorial Scholarship 

Interest on Investments 



II. SCHOLAK-SHIl' FUND (HKVENL'K). 

Hercipts. 



$727 59 


97 28 


50 00 


50 00 


26 00 



$950 87 



:t[ 






^:i 



m 






192 

. Expenditure. 

Scholarships awarded J7IW 40 

Balance on hand, May 4th, 1900 217 47 

III. HCH0LAR8HII' FUND (uAPITAL). , 

Receipts. 

To Balance on hand, May 4th, 18W> ^h.hm 87 

John Ralph King Scholarship 1,000 00 

Niabet Memorial Scholarship 1,000 00 

Stocks 1,400 00 

Interest on Investment 2() 00 

DisbursementD, 

Credited to Ordinary Scholarship Fund $26 00 

Stocks 1,400 00 

Balance on hand invested or awaiting investment 7,580 87 

•I 

IV. ENDOWMENT FUND. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, May 4th, 1890 $66,713 95 

Interest on Endowment and on Cash in Bank 4,694 22 

Disbursements. 

Credited to Ordinary Fund $4,694 22 

Balance on hand. May 4th, 1900, invested or in Bank awaiting 

invflistraent 55,713 95 

V. CONTINGENT FUND. 

Balance on hand. May 4th, 1899 $1,242 00 

Credited from Interest on Investments above a given rate . . . 200 00 

Balance on hand, May 4th, 1900 

VI. SUMMATION. 

Receipts. 

Total for Ordinary Fund, including Fees and 

Board of Resident Students $21,237 62 

Scholarship Fund 223 28 

Contingent Fund. 200 00 

$21,660 80 

Balance of Ordinary Fund, May 4th, 1899 .... $82 62 

Balance of Scholarship Fund, May 4th, 1899. . . 727 59 

810 21 



$!».■)( I M7 



$8,95ti 87 



J,Orj() 87 



,408 17 



,40« 17 



1,442 00 



$22,471 01 



193 



Disbnr»ements. 

Tdtftl for Ordinary Expenditure, including Board 

of Resident students 821,2h:{ ♦•<» 

Scholarships awarded 7.'i<'i 40 

Credited to Contingent Fund 2(K) (M) 

;st22,217 09 

Biilance to Credit of Ordinary Fund 83(> 40 

Uiiliince to Credit of Scholarship Fund 217 47 

26:5 92 

822,471 01 

BALANCE SHEET. I)H. CR. 

( )r(Uiiary Fund ^'M 45 

College Endowment Fund 55,71:5 95 

Scholarship Fund (Capital) 4,:i(M» 00 

Scholarship (Robert Carswoll, Capital) 2,iVM) H7 

(Jno. Ralph King) " 1.0<K> 00 

(Nisbet Memorial) '* l.(K.M) 00 

Fund (Ordinary) 217 47 

Contingent Fund 1,442 00 

Sundry Small Accounts 31 45 

Merchants Bank of Canada (Cash in Bank) $l,74!t lit 

Stocks, Loan Co's 1,400 00 

Mortgaged 58.H!t3 00 

Principal's House 4,;i.S0 (X) 

__$!<{(), 372 19 .^OH..S72 19 
Audited and found correct. ~^^~~'~~" 

J. M. xMATTHFW, ANDREW B. BAIRD, 

Maij 19th, 1900. Auditor. Treasnnr. 




m 






194 



PERSONAL DONATIONS FROM ONTARIO AND QUEBEC. 

FOB THE YBAR 1898-9 (aOUITIONAL). 



ill 1^1. 



\x'f 



'■ 






John Cassils, Montreal 

J. C. Kin«, " 

Hon, E. H. Bronaon, Ottawa 

C. Cockahutt, Brantford 

Joseph Henderdon, Toronto . 

D. Coulson, •« 



D. M. Tait, St. Thomas 

T. A. Dawes, Montreal 

G. R. Blyth, Ottawa 

A. McMiohael, Toronto 

Hon. E. H. Bronson, Ottawa . . . 
D. B. MacLennan, Cornwall. . . . 

J. DinRwall, " 

John Knox, Hamilton 

Wm. Vallance, " 

Thompson and Smith, Strathroy. 

R. A. Goldie, (Jalt 

John L. Morris, Montreal 



li>25 fJO 


50 (X) 


50 00 


50 00 


25 (X) 


25 00 


11 THE 1 


mo 00 


25 00 


26 00 


26 00 


25 00 


20 00 


25 00 


10 00 


26 00 


5 00 


10 00 


10 00 



Gunn Bros., Toronto flO ()0 

A. U. Creelman, " 25 0() 

B. E. Walker, " 25 <H) 

John Gowans, " 25 (K) 

B. Jennin^s, " 25 (Ml 

S. F. MoKinnon, '* 25 (H) 



Rev. And. Henderson, Toronto. 
Dr. Gilbert Gordon, Toronto, 

Scholarship Fund 

John Garland, Toronto 

Robt. Kilgour, " 

Geo. Vallance, Hamilton 

John Watt, Toronto 

Joseph Kilgour, " 

D. (iunn, " 

A. R. Creelman, " 

Colin McArthur, Montreal 



82 tJ<) 

25 00 
10 00 
10 00 
25 (K) 
20 00 
50 00 
2n 00 
25 00 
IW 00 




PERSONAL DONATIONS IN MANITOBA. 



MM 



R. M. Thompson, Winnipeg .... 
Rev. Jas. Farquharson, Pilot 

Mound 

A Friend, Manitoba 

Rev.S.W. Thompson, Qu'Appelle 
Rev. Prof. Baird, Winnij. ^ . . . . 
Rev. C. W. and Mrs. Gordon, 

Winnipeg 

Rev. C. W. Gordon (Scholarship 

Fund), Winnipeg 

G. R. Crowe (Scholarship Fund, 

Winnipeg 

Rev. Principal Patrick, Winnipeg 
Kenneth Mackenzie, '^ 



25 00 


J. B. McLaren, 


Winnipeg 


$25 00 




E. F. Hutchings 





25 00 


16 00 


John Leslie, 




25 (M) 


26 00 


Jamef Stuart, 




25 OO 


20 00 


David Horn, 




25 00 


25 00 


W. D. Russell, 




25 00 




Wm, Whyte, 




25 00 


50 00 


W. E. James, 




12 00 




Wm. Clark, 




25 00 


26 00 


Rev. John Fotheringham,Grenfell 


5 00 




Rev. J. A. Ferguson, Sandon, B.C. 


6 00 


50 00 


Rev. H. Young, 


Ymir, B.C 


5 00 


50 00 


Alex. Macdonald 


, Winnipeg 


25 00 


26 00 












Ml 



195 



REPORT OF THE PKESBYTEKIAN LADIES' (.'OLLEGE, 

OTTAWA. 



To the Venerable the General Assembly : 



The Board of Direotors of the Prt'shytorinn LiuUch' College, Ottawa, is happy 
to lie able to report a year of sueeessful work. 

There has been a large iiierease in the miinher of pupils in attendance, and a 
corresponding increase in revenue. 

The number of pupils enrolled, who have taken full or partial courses during 
the year, is 141. Of these, forty-six were in residence. 

The estimated revenue is $13,H00, and the exi)enditure is estimated at about 
tlio same amount. 

The sum of 11,200 has been expended in renovating and refiu'ni.shing. This 
lias added greatly to the appearance of the rooms and the comfort of the pupils. 

T." every department the work done has been of a high order, and the progress 
of liu' pupils satisfactory. 

Mrs. Ross, as House-Mother, has fully realized our expectations, so that the 
young ladies find in the College the atmosphere of a cultured Christian home. 

It is hoped that in connection with the Century Fund movement the greater 
part, if not the whole, of the debt upon the College buildings will be removed. 

The Board feels confident that the College, provided as it is with comfortable 
residence, careful and wise supervision of the Home Department, and a staff of 
thoroughly efficient and experienced teachers, is worthy of and will receive the 
lulk'st confid«' ce and most liberal patronage of the members of our Church. 




W. T. HEKRIDGE, 

President. 



W. D. ARMSTRONG, 

Managing Director, 



Ottawa, May 22nd, 1900. 






1 :■} 



19G 






ii^^ 



U%H<' 



M) 



' ^i*"^"^ 





REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE 
BRANTFORD YOUNG LADIES' COLLEGE FOR 
1899-1900. 



To the Venerable the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Canada: 

The Directors of the Braiitford Young Ladies' College respectfully present to 
the Assembly their twenty-sixth annual report. The attendance during the year 
of regular boarders and day pupils has been 109. 

The teaching staff, under the direction of the Rev. Principal Cruikshank, have 
maintained the high standard of instruction set forth in the calendar, and have 
sought diligently to mould for Christian usefulness the young ladies entrusted to 
their care. Most careful attention has been given to biblical history and literature, 
especially in their relation to daily life. 

The Charter of the College has been amended during the year so as to include 
the Conservatory of Music, and that department has been ex^3nded, embracing in 
all a staff of twenty-five teachers and three hundred pupils. Additional accom- 
modation has been provided outside the College building whereby students of both 
sexes may enjoy the advantages of Conservatory instruction. The depirtmeiit 
continues under the able directorship of Mr. \V. Norman Andrews of Louvlon and 
Leipzic. Affiliation with the Toronto College of Music affords special facilities to 
students following the lines of a university curriculum. Last year forty pupils 
passed successfully one hundred and sixteen examinations conducted by the 
Toronto College of Music, five of the number receiving the artist's diploma 
(A. T. C. M.) 

The Art department has made very satisfactory progress under tlie super- 
vision of Mr. I. R. Seavey, who entertains bright hopes for the future. 

The Moderator of the General Assembly visited the College during the year, 
and can speak highly of the purpose and work of the Institution. 

In again soliciting the patronage and sympathy of the Church at large the 
Directors would respectfully call attention to the lack of religious instruction iu 
the educational system of the Province, and to the growing need of strong and 
definite teaching of the evangelical truths of our faith. This College, with kindred 
institutions, are seeking to meet this great requirement and desires the loyal sup- 
port and sympathy of the whole Church. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

WM. WATT, Jr., 

President. 



W. R. CRUIKSHANK, 



Brantford. May JOth, 1900, 



Secretary. 



In presei 
.\s8oinbly the 
country have 
the circumsta 
tensive farm 
increasing, 
effect in atim 
in the. Kootei 
contract, a la 
happily settl 
lame for the 
1S99. 



The Boi 

manses ; it i 
gallon to loM 
people are w 
winter weat 
general pru( 
gregaiion a 



Of the 

of lean. C 

North- Wes 

two in the 

two are in 

one in For 

nine in Ed 

Ot the niai 

Cal>;ary ai 

The % 

81."), 300 01 

property 



Pi N 



j:J'?^" 



mm> 



^.ii^AM-o^ 



InU 

eighteen 
Till- Boai 
or 440 h\ 
ahout on 
m:aises, 
the u\ani 
lal entn 
contribi 



197 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF MANAGEMENT OF THE 
CHURCH AND MANSE BUILDING FUND OF THE 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA FOR MAN- 
ITOBA AND THE NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES 
FOR THE YEAR 1899-1900. 



In presenting its eighteenth report, your Board begs respectfully to inform the General 
Assombly that the past year was the most active in iti history. Tlie chief industries of the 
country have been fairly i)rosperous and remunerative during the past few years, and hence 
the circumstances of the people have improved; railway building has been active, opening up ex- 
tensive farming districts for settlement ; ard the indow of immigranta has been steadily 
increasing, tilling up old :<ettlements aau occupying new districts. These all have iiad their 
effect in stimulating church and manse erection. And, although, a severe strike was in force 
in tlie Kootenay district among the miners, yet in nwilway-building, and even in mining by 
contract, a large force of men found employment, notwi£4tstanding the strike. The strike is 
liappily settled ; and the intiow into the farming districts promising to be unprei.edentedly 
iarye for the present season, it would seem us if the year 1900 would be e(jually active with 
1S99. 

RECORD FOR THE YEAR. 

The Board, during the year, assisted in the erection of forty new churches and eight 
manses : it made a loan on a church previously built, to reduce interest and help the congre- 
gation to lower its claims on tha Augmentation Fund ; and made a loan to a mission whose 
people are widely scattered to enable them to build sheds to shelter their horses in the severe 
winter weather. To one congregation to which & grant was made, the Board made (contrary to its 
general practice) a temporary loan to save embarrassment ; and it increased to another con- 
gregation a grant previously made from 8100 to §150. 



HOW AND WHERE HELP GIVEN. 

(Jf the assistance given, iu twenty-two cases it was by way of grant and in thirty by way 
of loan. Of the new churches, two are in Ontario, fourteen in Manitoba, thirteen in the 
North- West Territories aud eleven in Btitish Columbia. Five of the manses are iu Manitoba, 
two in the North- West Territories and one in British Columbia. Of the congregatious helped, 
two are in the Presbytery of Superior, three in Winnipeg, six in Rock Lake, three in Melita, 
one iu Portage la Prairie, two in Brandon, live in Minnedosa, four in Ret^ina, one in Calgary, 
nine in Edmonton, one iu Kamloops, six in Kootenay, four in Westminster and two in Victoria 
Ot' the nuinses, three are in Rock Lake Presbytery, two in Minnedosa and one each iu Melita, 
Calgary and Kamloops. 

The grants made amounted to §"2, 640 on buildings valued at $15,950 and the loans to 
'?l'>,3O0 on buildings valued at $14,810. The outlay of the Board thus amounts to .'J17,940 on 
property valued at §60,230. 

RECORD OK EIGHTEEN YEARS. 

In 1882, when the Board was first appointed by the General Assembly, there were only 
ei£!liteen churches and three manses in all the country between Lake Superior and the Yukon. 
Till' Board has since that time assisted in the erection of 364 churches and seventy-six manses, 
or 440 buildings in all, worth, exclusive of the land on which they stand, .$583,820. Only 
about one-fifth of the money controlled by the Board has been employed in the erectiou of 
manses, while four-fifths was employed in the erection of churches, and yet the rent saved by 
tlie manses would yield interest at the rate of between nine and teii per cent, on the total capi- 
tal entrusted to the Board. The saving of money eflfected by the erection of manses is a direct 
contributioa to the Home Mission and Augmentation Funds. 






198 



NISBKT ACADEMY. 




From the diviaion of the assets of the Nisbet Academy, sanctioned by the last General 
Assembly, the Board received Mie net sum of $5,122.98, which wa:< added to capital. 



TWENTIETH CENTURY FV.W. 




Your Board is gratified to learn that it is co participate in the amount to be raised Id con- 
nection with the Twentieth Century Fund. Betwcun the extremities of the territory in which 
the opera I ou a of the Board are carried on is a distance of 3,500 miles. The volume of inimi 
gration into tiiis part of the Dominion is steadilj increasing — 40,000 in 1898, 50,000 in lN!t(), 
forecast for 1900, 70,000 to 75,000. The mosr, f f these people are beginning life ; for a few 
^•oars they are not making, but sptn.Ung money, and have little o invest in churches or 
manses. Many of thtm are from sections where little attention was paid to their rel-gious 
wants, and they have become indifferent, if not hostile, to religion. If visibility is to be given 
to religion, if the necessary accommodation is to be possessed for Sabbath Sohool work or the 
Services j* the Sanctuary, a chu'^h is necessary ; and, without help, the people feel uneiiual 
to the task of building. And tht- -elp given by the Board now is so inadequate that building 
is often postponed beyond the tim hat prudence suggests. The average grant of your Board 
is only $120, that of the American i resbyterian Church (North) over $450. Could the Hoiird 
double its grantr in amount, buUdings would be erected earlier, and the cause of religion 
greatly advanced. The increase ot the capital of the Board, it is hoped, will enable the Board 
to increase its grants in number and amount. 



Elra—A. 
line of Manin 

Daleshoro 
eight miles tc 

miles east of 



ACTIVITY OF THE FUND. 





wmm 



That the receipts on account of 'oans made in previous years amounted to $11,747.52 and 
embraced seventy-five items show the Fund to be fairly active, and that there is a geueral dis- 
position on t le part of congregucions to refund money.<; advanced to them. Under instructions 
from Synods, Presbyteries are interesting themselves more and more in seeing that loans are 
repaid. 



DETAILED STATEMENT. 

As has been done in other years, a detailed statement of grants and loans is herewith ap- 
pended, showing the mission stations or congregations helped and the Presbyteries to which 
they belong. 

PnKSBYTERY OF SUPERIOR. 

Nepigon—K station connected with the Schreiber Mission, and being sixty-four milea east 
of Port Arthur. The lake and river from which the village takes its name are famous for their 
fishing, and are much frequented in summer by tourists. Frame church built, cost $850, grant 
$170. 

Dryden — A village on the Canadian Pacific Railway about eighty miles east of Rat Portage. 
In this neighbourhood is an Ontario Government Experimental Farm ; quite a number of 
settlers are located here who are engaged in agriculture. Neat frame church built, cost .SlluO, 
loan $400. 



Olive— 'd 
I'acitic Railw 
loan S500. 

Hilton— 
thirty -six m 
country ; fr< 



west of Pt 
§800, grar 



PRESBYTERY OF WINNIPEG. 




Tyudall — A station about twenty-nine miles east of Winnipeg on the main line of liie 
Canadian Pacific Railway. The industries carried on in the neighbourhood are farming, ranch 
ing, quarrying and wood-cutting. Neat :.c"/ie church, cost $1000, grant $200. 

Lang.side—Oaa of the stations constituting the Dominion City congregation ; farming and 
ranching settlement ; frame church, cost $750, grant $100. 

Parkdale — A mission station about seven miles north of Kildonan; one of the points supplied 
by the late Dr. John Black, but which hitherto never had a church. Frame church, cost 
$1,200, loan $400. 



NezuL 

west of E 

niause, ci 

Strii 

ti\riving 

Ross 

cost $50< 

Mil, 

Bussell 



'; I 



ftiyiijj>! iiji W i i^ 



r^> 



199 



at Ge 



FREMBYTERY OF ROCK LAKE. 

Rosehaitk — A station on the Noithern Pacific Railway (Morris and Brandon Branch) about 
thirty-four miles west ot Morris ; good farming district, thrifty settlers, not strongly Presby- 
terian ; church osting $1,500, grant $200 and a temporary loan of 3400. 

Miami — A town about six miles '^arther west on the same railway, surrcjnded by a pros- 
perous fantiing community ; manse, trame, cost $1,600, loan $700. 

Rolii'id — A town about eight miles east of Rosebank on the same line, supported by a 
famous wheat country ; manse, frame, cost $1,600, loan $500. 

/'////rtvz— Station, Northern Pacific Railway (Souris Branch), about seventeen miles from 
Belniont., situated in an excellent farming country ; church, cost $1,050, loan $500. 

Mjrgaret — A station about seven mifes farther west than Dunrea on th« same railway, 
wiUi a good farming country surrounding ; church, cost $1,200, loan $600. 

Ihonihill — A station on the Canadian Pacific Railway (Pembina Branoh), seven miles 
west of Morden ; good wheat section ; manse, frame, cost $1,2.30, loan $500. 



PRESBYTERY OK MELITA. 
\ 

Elva — A station on the Estevan Branch Canadian Pacific Railway, near the boundarv 
line of Manitoba ; excellent farming district; manse, frame, cost $l,2f)0, loan $600. 

r>aleshoro — A farming district farther west alone the Estevan Line, but some seven or 
eight miles to the north ; frame church, cost $600, grant $125. 

i'llcitewen — One of the stations constituting the Oxbow congregation, and situated eight 
miles east of that town, surrounded by a good farming country ; church, frame, cost $780, loan 

PRESBYTERY OF GLENBORO. 

Olive — One of the stations forming the congregation of Treherne, a town on the Canadian 
Piicitic Railway, Soutl, Western Branch; good farming district ; frame church, costing $1,000, 
loan $i>00. 

Hilton — A village on the Northern Pacific Railway (Morrison and Brandoh Branch) about 
thirty-six miles south-east of Brandon ; Crofter Settlement ; good farming and grazing 
^.ountry ; frame church, cost $1,800, loan $700. 



PRESBYTERY OF BRANDON. 

Wallace — A preaching station eight miles north-west of Virden and forming part of the 
charge ; good farming and crazing country ; stone cliurch, cost $2,5fX), ioaa $7'MI. 

Miiiiota — Station, (ireat North- West Central, surrounded by a cooJ farming country ; 
frame church, cost $1,500, loan $5(X). 



PRESBYTERY OF PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE. 

IVeslbouriie — A village on tiie Manitoba and North- West Railway, seventeen miles north- 
west of Portage la Prairie ; settlers engaged in farming and cattle raising ; frame church, cost, 
•$sO(t, grant $100. 

PRESBYTERY OF MINNEDOSA. 



Nt"Miiale — A village on the Manitoba and North- Western Railway nearly 100 miles north- 
west of Portage la Prairie, surrounded by a superior grazing and farming country ; frame 
manse, cost $1,200, grant $1,'>0. 

Strathclair — A village distant eight miles from the above mentioned, surrounded by a 
thriving settlement ; church cost $1,500, loan $70<). 

Rossbuni — A good farming and grazing district, north-west of Shoal Lake ; church, frame, 
cost $.50<), grant $100. 

Minuiska — A good farming district in Itie Highlands of Manitoba, eight miles east of 
I'ussell and associated with it ; church, frame, cost $1,2(X), loan $5(X). 



M 
m 



200 

Yorklon, — A growing town at the rerminus of the Mauitob. and North- Western Ruilway 
surrounded by a country well suited for mixed 'arming ; congregation augmented, j^rowint;; 
manse, frame, cost $1,600, loan $700. 



I'RESBYTKRY OF REGIN'A. 

Poplar Grovr. — A mission station south-west of \\ hitewood, Assa., farming bcttleiuent ; 
church, frame, cost iJ.lOO, loan S250. 

Loitglaketoii — Settlement on Prince Albert Branch, about thirly-Hve miles northwest of 
Regina ; settlers engaged in ranching and wheat laising ; church, frame, cost $500, loan sl.'iO, 

Kcniiell — A station connected with Longhiketon ; settlers engaged in mixed fanning; 
frame churcii, cost $650, grant $130. 

Island Lake — Station south-oast of Prince Albert ; settlers engaged raising grain and 
rearing cattle ; frame church, cost $800, grant $160. 

PRESBYTERY OF CALGaRY. 

Maple Creek — A village on the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway 600 miles wtst 
of Winnipeg, prosperous ranching district ; manse, frame, $1,200, loan $500. 



Cascade -^i 
charcii cost $1,' 

iirand ror^ 
•xUKi; Urge 81 j 
^viU bt! the lar^ 

Give>t'it:oocit 
railway. .^cti| 
mil..'" ao'^ "■ 



/.aiii,'-/ey—'] 
fruit, raising ; 
verv progre^H 

' /Vr/ .l/('i"'J 
enuver. people! 

<\,{M\, i;rant : 

/i.iiiiet/ — 

the ro^d betw 



PRESBYTERY Or EDMONTON. 

IVillow Knoll — A station connected with Innistail on the Calgary luiii Edmonton Railway 
about seventy-five miles north of Calgary, a farming and grazing settiemen:. ; ciiurch, log, cost 
$'•00, grant .$50. 

Pleasant Valley — A station belonging to tlie Lamerton Mission, and sun.- sixteen miles 
south-east of Lacombe ; grazing and grain growing district ; <rame chunh, „ i $800, !.;rant 
$100. 

Fairview — A station eight miles north-west of Lacombe ; set tit rs engaj/ed in rearing 
cattle and raising grain ; church, frame, cost $700, grant .$100. 

Glory Qtiayle — Hope Church, eighte'^" . iiles west of Edmonton, ftvrming ani ranihiiig 
settlement ; log church, cost $400, graat .;«'.>0. 

IVellnirn — Country station ten or twoivW' n'-; .* ••.■est of £dmonton, fcrming andgra'int; 
district ; church, frame, cost .$500, grant $100 

Belmont — A settlemen.. north-", 'it of E hiioutau si or eight miles, fai-ning and grazing 
district ; church, frame, cost .$750, grant $100. 

Agricola — A country district south of Fort Saskatchewan ; loan of $100 to help erect 
sheds worth $250. 

Logan — Beaver Lake District, forty miles south-east of Edmonton, a fine grazing country ; 
market too distant for grain raising ; log church, cost .$350, grant .$50. 

Clearivater — A station connected with Leduc Mission, situated about twelve miles south- 
east of Edmonton ; people engaged in farming and ranching. Crant on church worth $r)(ii), 
increased from $100 to $L'50. 



South Wt 
Sanaimo '; poj 

,S7. Pattf'- 
encourage con 



PRESBYTERY OF KAMLOOPS. 



Spalluincheeii — Congregation, augmented, Okanagan Valley, B.C.; manse, frame, cost 
1,500, loan ,$500. 



PRESBYTERY OF KOOTENAY. 



Iliisi 



Fort Sti-cie — A town of 4(X) or 30() in the Valley of the Columbia, dic;.:»nt about ten miles 
frr.ni C'lfibt lok on the CanadiPi. Pacific Railway. Mining, trading and ranching centre; 
om ! oh, frail *; cost .?>,200, b)an $400. 

c/«v- i\ coal mining town of 1,500 people. Crow's Nest Pass Railway, frame church, co!t 
?-\.'!0O, 'oc.ri .S7(K). 

Sano-'u — M'uing town, Xcotenay country, population 1,500; frame church, cost $2,r>00, 
loat. ^'00. /. ^.,^. -ibie fire destroyed more than one half of the town and the church was des- 
troyed, Tix- i.-isurance amounted to only about $1,000. The Board holds the policy, but the 
resmic:* ot ti.i congregation are exhausted, and the church must be rebuilt. 



201 

C'lfi-ade — A town on the Rnbson aiitl Penticlon. Railway, trading and mining cei tre ; 
churcli cost 81,000, loan .$400. 

Crand Forks — A growing town situated at the main forka of the Kettle River ; population 
J,(K(II; liirge smelter here, ores come from the adjoining district to tlie nortii and west; here 
will be the large trading centre west of the Columbia River ; church, frame, cost $2,000, loan 
;i60(l. 

Civcnv;ood — A thriving town of •J,r)0O, situated twenty-five miles farther west on the same 
railway. Active business centre, mining, smeltine, trading ; annual business turn ever a 
niiii. m and a quarter. Franje churcii, cost .^'ijtJOO, loan .ST'XX 



PRESBYTERY OK WESTMINSTER. 

I.aiii^ley — Situated in the Lower Fraser Valley, peopla engaged in farming, ranching and 
fru't raising ; (ihurch cost ?>7r)0, grunt .slOO. ^arming settlements in British Columbia not 
very progre^s-ive. 

I'ort Moiidy — A station on the Cane-dian Pacific Railway about twelve miles fioni Van- 
couver, people eunaged in lumbering, gardening, etc.; frame churcii, cost >!7')0, grant ^loO. 

Tiwada Island — Mining settlement up the Coast from Vancouver ; frame church, cost 
.^IJHMi, grant S-200. 

Ilunetl — Village near the Yukon Alaska boundary line, one of th" important points on 
the ro.-vil between Skaguay and Dawson; church, frame, cost 84,000, loan •'?400. 

PRESnYTERY OF VICTORIA. 

South IVelliiigton — A coal mining village on Vancouver Island about eight miles from 
Xanaimo ; population mostly engaged in mining ; frame church, cost .'?400, grant >y\'lv\. 

St. Patif s C////;-;//— Victoria, growing congregation, churcli worth .S8,o00, loan S700 to 
encourage congregation to reduce debt, lower rate of interest, and hasten day of self support, 

J. B. McLaren. 

Chdiyiiian. 



f 






202 



BOARD OF MANAGEMENT OF THE CHURCH AND MAN8E 

BUILDING FUND FOR MANITOBA AND 

THE NORTH-WEST. 



IhW/^^ 





II 



■ly.-- 



CASH STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING MAY Ist, 1900. 

May Ist, 1899, To balance in Bank of Hamilton $20,264 87 

May Ist, 1900, To receipts on account of loans as yer 

Schedule " A " 11,747 52 

To refund re Nisbett Academy of amount 

paid out prior to May Ist, 1899 229 90 

To capital account being amount received 
from Dr. Warden re Nisbett Academy 
?6, 175.26, less $1,000 paid to Manitoba 
College, and $52.77 taxes on Academy 
property 5,122 98 

To subscriptions from Stanley Mission, Mon- 
treal, per Dr. Warden 10 00 

To interest on Bank a v".« mnt 736 55 

Contra. 

By payments out on account of new loans per 

Schedule " B " $10,755 00 

By payments out en account of grants made 

per Schedule " C " 1,236 00 

By fire premiums paid out ch» :eable to cur- 
rent loans 57 65 

By Clerk's salary 13 months, to May lat 260 00 

By expenses of management beins; : Piinting 
annual report, $26.20 ; Postage, 
$17.51 ; Stationery, $19.90 63 61 

Exchange account 3 03 

May 1st, 1900, By balance in Bank 25,727 53 



SCHEDULE "A." 
Receipts on Account of Loajns for the Yeak Ending 

Receipts on Loans, 

1899, Dominion City Church 

Austin, Man 

M^cleod, N. W.T 

Calf Mountain, Man 

Slocan City 

South Edmonton, B.C 

Arazona, Man 

Nisbett Academy 

Chilliewack, B.C., Gait Church 

Golden, B.C 

Delta, B.C., St. Stephen's 

Sintaluta, Man .... 

Poplar Grove, St. John's Church 

Victoria, Man., Manse 

Maple Creek, N.W.T 

Carried forward 



$38,101 82 



— — — — V'JU, li'J 

3INO May 1st, 1900. 




$250 00 




65 00 




55 15 




92 00 




124 40 




75 00 




87 35 




30 00 




2 25 




206 60 




121 00 




10 00 




101 20 




&2 00 





,281 95 



203 



Brought forward 

Rapid City, Man 

Stonewall, Man 

Chilliwach, B.C., Cook's Church. . . . 

Pincher Creek, N. W.T 

Pipestone, Man 

McGregor, Man 

Cadarcis, M>^n 

Morris, Man., Manae 

liolland, Man 

Hilton, Man 

Rounthwaite. Man 

VVolseley, N.W.T 

Crystal City, Man 

South Plympton, Man 

Chater, Man 

HartJiey, Man 

do 

Boissevain 

Nesbitt, Man 

Cedar Hill, B.C 

Trail, B.C 

Gladstone, Man . . 

Virden, Man . . 

Griswold, Man 

Enderby, B. C 

Oak Lake, Man., St. David's 

Olive, Man 

Oxbow 

Clearwater, Man 

Victoria, B.C., Springridge Church. 

Treesbank, Man 

Motfatt, Man 

VVheatlands 

Douglas, Man 

Innisfail, N.W.T 

Broadview, N.W.T 

Arden, Man 

Brandon, Zion Church 

Sapperton, B.C 

Manitou, Man 

Regina . 

Whitewood, N.W.T 

Kenniay, Man 

Carnduff 

Melita, Man 

Dugald, Man 

Belmont . 

Stoney Mountain, Man 

(.^u'Appelle, Troy, N.W.T . . 

Moose Jaw, N.W.T 

(irassmere, Man 

Macdonald, Man 

Kaslo, B.C 

Shanks, Man 

Rt)S8land, B.C 

Fleming, Man . . 

Cartwright, Man 

Langley Prairie, B.C 

Lumsden, Man 

Swan Lake 

Indian Head, Man 



,281 95 
161 (X) 
297 <J0 
.{0 00 
327 00 
265 00 
125 00 
160 00 
300 00 
125 00 

116 40 
67 00 
74 65 

8(X) 00 

66 00 

47 50 

119 00 

604 00 

237 25 

50 00 

210 00 

66 00 

467 25 

385 00 

400 00 

139 25 

280 00 

7 65 

150 00 

350 00 

50 00 

45 00 

90 00 

100 32 

200 00 

137 20 

117 50 
379 05 

26 80 

22 50 

420 (JO 

300 00 

130 00 

88 00 

150 00 

151 70 
57 00 
62 30 
40 00 

150 W 

2(X) 00 

5<) 70 

62 25 

35 85 

70 (K) 

35 00 

20 00 

300 00 

134 00 

226 CO 

6() 45 

136 00 



•11,747 62 



ii 




t 

; ■'' 





204 



SCHEDULE "B.' 

Payments Onl on New Loans Made 

Poplar Point, Man 

Si)allum8cheen, B.C 

Poplar Grove, Man 

Rosebank, Man 

Silverplains, Man., Church 

Olive, Man 

Cloverdale, Man 

Cascade City, li.C 

North Portal, N.W.T 

Thornhill, Man 

Miami, Man 

Parkdale, Man 

Wamphrey, N. W.T 

Elva Manse, Man 

Glen Ewen, N.W.T 

Minniska, Man 

Roland, Man 

Sandon, B.C 

Bennett, B.C 

Roseplain, N.W.T 

Fernie, B.C., Knox 

Dunrea, Man 

Victoria, B.C., Knox 

Fort Steele, B.C 

Griswold, Man., balance due them 



.f400 00 


500 00 


255 00 


400 (M) 


400 00 


500 00 


400 00 


400 00 


150 (X) 


bm 00 


700 00 


400 00 


150 00 


600 00 


mn 00 


500 00 


5(X) 00 


700 00 


400 00 


100 00 


700 00 


500 00 


700 00 


400 00 


200 00 


$10,755 00 



1{KIH)K| 
INF 
FOl^ 



The C(| 

rttl'iirds Bom| 
will mark 
full measui 
tn which tl 
tlie past be 
hrts unforti 
th>it there 
absorbed ii 

The f( 
condition < 



Conj^regati 
Received f 
Interest fr 
Ministers' 



^ SCHEDULE "C." 

Payments i)nt un Account of Grants Made. 

Westbourne, Man'. 

Nipigon, Ont 

South Wellington, B.C 

Langside, Man 

Newdale 

Clearwater 

Tyndal, Man., on account 

Rossburn 

Rosebank 

L'ingley, B.C. 

Willow Knoll, on account 



Audited and found correct. 

H. H. SAUNDERSON. 



May 16th, 1900. 



$100 00 


170 00 


125 00 


100 00 


150 00 


50 00 


100 00 


100 00 


200 00 


100 00 


40 00 



l,2.S5 00 



Balance a' 
.\unuities 
.\nuuity t 
Printing, 
Rev. T; S 
Expenses 
Proportic 
Balance { 



Amount 
Suhacrij 
Legacies 
L(jan8 r( 



.\ mount 

Taxes, i 
Legal e 
Ldss on 
yef 
Ciiah o\ 



,;fj>»«!"'iy6;iw«W.: 



205 



KEPOKT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE AdEI) AND 
INFIRM iNIINISTEKS' FUND (WESTERN SECTION) 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31st, 190U. 



The Committee desires toexpress its thankfulness that the year covered hy thisIlei)ort 
affords some grtiund for encouragement, and the hope is induls(ed that increased liherahty 
will mark the future and that, at no distant date, it will be possible to come up to the 
full measure of the annuities provided for by the rules, instead of only the modified scale 
t(i which those ministers, who have given over twunty-tive years of active service, have in 
the past been reduced. It will be a source of satisfaction that the adverse balance which 
has unfortunately been so prominent for the past few yi^ars, has now disappeared, and 
that there is a small balance to credit. This balance, however, will be more than 
al)sorbed in the payments of an outstanding annuity and the supplementary grants. 

The following Financial Statements exhibit the transactions for the year, and the 
condition of each account at the close : 

ORDINARY FUND. 



Beceipts. 

Congregational contributions and donations 88,647 '^5 

Received from Hymnal Committee 1,148 50 

Interest from Endowment Fund 7,09.'i 5{> 

Ministers' Rates 1,803 42 

Disbursevients. 

Balance at debit, March Slst, 1899 SI, 840 72 

Annuities paid 15,80.'i 95 

Annuity to Miss B. (Wright Estate) 200 00 

Printing, including proportion of Blue liook 95 65 

Rev. T. Scoular, rates returned 54 75 

Kxpenses of Committee .'^7 15 

Proportion of General Expenses 500 00 

Balance at Credit 160 64 



S18,692 86 



S18,692 86 



CAPITAL ACCOUNT. 



Receipts. 

Amount held for investment, March .Ust, 1899 $13,520 74 

Subscriptions received 536 00 

Legacies 1,900 00 

Loans repaid 18,656 00 

Dishirsements. 

Amount invested during the year $29,500 00 

Taxes, repairs, etc 129 22 

Legal expenses re pre j>erty sold 26 79 

Loss on sale of pro{)erty which reverted to the Church several 

years ago 3,014 32 

Caah on hand waiting investment 1,942 41 



- §34,612 74 



S34.612 74 



i 



206 



CAPITAL FUND INVK8TMENT ACCOUNT. 

At Credit, March 3l8t, 1899 $146,624 74 

Contributiuns during the year 2,436 00 

$148,060 74 
Deduct loas on property sold and legal expeniies $3,041 11 

Taxe«, repairs, etc 129 22 

$3,170 33 

Held as follows : — 

Mortgages $120,169 00 

Properties foreclosed, or which have fallen into the haiids 

of the Church 14,589 00 

Debentures 5,200 00 

Stocks 3,(X)0 00 

Cash on hand 1,942 41 



$144,8!)0 41 



$144,8<M) 41 



Comparing the year covered by this report with the preceding one, the following 
points may be noted. That in Congregational Contributions and Donations there Ih hu 
increase in favour of the present year of $047.56. In Interest there is an increase of 
$755.95, and in Ministers' rates an increase of $53.50. The Committee will be pardoiied 
for remarking that the slight increase in receipts from congregations ia far short of whnt 
might reasonably have been expected, especially with the increased prosperity of tlie 
country, and is hardly creditable to a large and wealthy Church like ours. The 
increase from Interest must be considered satisfactory when it is remembered that theru 
has not been any large addition to the Fund for the past two years. Ministers' Rates 
appear to be at a standstill and can scarcely be said to indicate increased interest. The 
substantial gift of $1,148.50 from the Hymnal Committee is acknowledged with thank- 
fulness by this Committee. 



M 



ANNUITANTS AND ANNUITIES. 





Notwithstanding the improved condition of the Ordinary Fund, the Committee could 
not, in paying annuities, go beyond the modified scheme of $5, instead of $10, for each 
year of service beyond twenty-five. Your Committee cannot help feeling that while the 
plan of payment may be a necessity under existing circumstances, it nevertheless works 
most unfairly to ministers who have given more than the twenty-five years of active 
service in the Canadian church. However, until the congregations are aroused to a larger 
measure of liberality, it is to be feared that injustice will continue. 

Seventy-nine Aimuitants have drawn benefit from the Fund during the year, the 
several payments calling for a total sum of $15,879.65. As compared with the preceding 
year this is a decrease in number of four, and in amount of $139.66. 

The following is a list of the Annuitants together with the amounts to which each was 
entitled. All were paid with the exception of $75.60 in the case of the late William 
Cleland, which has been paid since March 31st. The delay arose from not having the 
date of his death. 

In the case of James Malcolm the amount represents three half-yearly payments. 
This was done to meet the necessity for payment in advance. 



207 



Rev, 



rojiowing 




jre iH ;iii 




crease of 




jardtjtied 




'' of what 




y of the 




8. The 




lat theru 




rs' Rntes 




St. The 




h thank- 





John Fotheringham 9127 50 

James Malcolm 15<i 00 

James Mitchell ' 150 00 

M. Barr 200 00 

Robt. Renwick 150 00 

W. C. Wendell 200 00 

James Hanran 100 00 

John Gray 230 00 

VVm. White 210 00 

Wm. Cleland 176 <iO 

Smith Hutchinson 120 00 

Charles Campbell 66 65 

Samuel Fenton 130 00 

John McNab 195 00 

R. Stevenson 230 00 

D. Andarson 235 00 

Jos. Alexander 260 (X) 

Thos. Wilson 200 00 

David Wardrope 236 00 

Wm. Matheson 210 00 

James P'.ack 240 00 

Thos. Goldsmith 140 00 

Angus McColl 276 00 

Chas. Cameron 210 (JO 

Arch Carrie 210 (X) 

D. McNaughton 33 33 

John Crombie, D.D. . . . 235 CO 

Geo. Bremner 225 00 

Daniel Gordon 275 00 

D.M.Mcintosh 140 00 

James Stewart 190 00 

John Lees 225 00 

Wm. Millican 230 00 

Wm. Meikle 170 00 

John Geddes *50 00 

John McMechan 220 00 

John McMillan 240 00 

D. M. Cameron 255 00 

Wm. Forlong 225 00 

Robt. Rodgers 275 00 

D. Davidson 60 42 



Rev. 



it 



tt 



It 
tt 



tt 
tt 
tt 



t( 
tt 
tt 



Thomas Wardrope 0275 OO 

James .Middlemiss 260 1)0 

James Wilson 250 00 

R. Ure, D.D 270 00 

A. Younx 110 50 

John Morrison 215 (K> 

John Anderson 270 00 

■John G. Murray 250 00 

M. Turnbull 100 (K» 

J. B. Duncan 275 00 

D. C. Johnson 150 00 

Wm. Anderson 142 50 

A. F. McKenzie 105 <J0 

Wm. Gregg, D.D 275 00 

John James, D.D 216 00 

J. S. Burnett 240 00 

D. Wishart 270 00 

W. Forrest 215 00 

Wm. Lochead 245 00 

A. M. McClelland 125 00 

John McEwen 230 00 

John McRobie 260 00 

Arch, McDiarmid 250 (K) 

And. Tolmie 275 (JO 

Robt. Gray 160 0( J 

Alex. Matheson 260 00 

Geo. Outhbertson 255 20 

J. K. Smith, D.D 255 20 

Wm. Bennett 255 20 

Donald Strachan 184 17 

JohnMcAlpine 126 66 

John Mackie 270 00 

Robt . Knowles 235 00 

A. D. McDonald, D.D . 275 00 
A. T. Colter (half benefit 

only) 72 50 

Arch. Stewart 267 50 

J. M. Munro 35 (i2 

W. Peattie ?f"' ^K) 



'Represents only a half-year's payment, havinK been overpaid in previous year. 

Of the names of Annuitants in the above list, the following appear for the last time, 
the Master having called them nome : — James Mitchell, Wm. Cleland, D. McNaughton, 
Charles Campbell, D. Davidson, A. Young, M. Turnbull and J. M. Munro. 



SPECIAL GRANTS. 



After due and careful consideration the following special grants under Rule 15 have 
been made : — Rev. John McNab, $75 ; Rev. D. C. Johnston, $50; Rev. Ro'^ert Rogers, 

$50. 



THE ENDOWMENT FUND. 



In consequence of the decision of last Assembly, that the special effort for securing 
thebalance of the Endowment be discontinued in view of the Century Fund effort, your 
Committee has suspended action in the matter and therefore cannot report any progress 
beyond the small additions referred to in the Financial Statements. 




IMAGE EVALUATION 
TEST TARGET (MT-3) 




1.0 



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1.25 



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us 

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110 



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2.0 



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IIIIIM 



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71 



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Photographic 

Sciences 

Corporation 




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23 WEST MAIN STREET 

WEBSTER, N.Y. 14580 

(716) S73-4503 



't-"^'*- 
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208 



APPLICATIONS FOK LEAVE TO KETIRE. 



A;)i>licatioii8 for leave to retire from the active duties of the ministry, and to be 
placed on the Fund for benefit have been received from the following : — 



Name. 



PRESBYTEUV. 



; AOE 



Years of 

Service Reason for Uetirim 
Claimed. 



Rev. D. (i. Cameron . . . Hamilton 43 

" John Turnbull . . . Quebec 72 

•' H.M. Pars(ms,D.D. Toronto 71 

" Andrew Hudson. . . Paris 79 

" Alex. Campbell . . . Regina, N.W.T G2 

" Elias Mullan Toronto 68 

" Jas. Cameron Toronto 



16 years. 

;w " 

20 " 

22 " 

25A " 

32| " 



58 18 
N. M. Phee • Glengarry 51) I 11 



Temporary infirmity. 

Age and weakness. 

Age. 

Age. 

Ill-health. 

Infirmity of varied 

character. 
lU-heaUh. 
Ill-health. 



•J ■ 

i <^- 

i.r?; 



In the case of the Revs. John Turnbull, Dr. Parsons and Andrew Hudson, each 
being over the age of seventy, the Cummittee recommend that they be allowed to 
retire and go on the Fund for ben'jfit, the last named for half-benefit only, not having 
paid rates. 

In the case of the Rev. A. Campbell it is recommended that he be placed on the 
Fund for one year, his case to come up for re-consideration. 

In the case of the Rev. D. G. Cameron, who has in some measure recovered, at his 
own request benefit is limited to a period of an allowance for seven months, which has 
been granted by the Committee. 

In the case of the Rev. E. Mullan, and Rev. James Camei-.n, the infirmity, in the 
judgment of the Committee, is not such as to preclude ministerial work, and therefore 
the Cummittee cannot give favourable recommendation. 

In the case of the Rev. Norman McPhee, whose application was before the Com- 
mittee a year ago, a further application has been made by Mr. McPhee, and inquiry is 
now being made. It is recommended that his case be left in the hands of the Committee. 



T ;? 



MINISTERS WISHING TO CONNECT WITH THE FUND. 



In view of the frequent application made by ministers who are not connected by 
payment of rates, and who are beyond the four year limit, for information as, to how 
they may become connected, and as the Committee is of the opinion that having to come 
specially before the Assembly for leave to do so has a deterring effect, and as it is most 
desirable that all the ministers of our church under the age fixed by the Assembly (55), 
should be in full connection and pay rates, the Committee resolved to recommend that 
the Assembly give power to the Committee to receive all applicants on payment of the 
proper rate. 

The Committee also resolved to make a special appeal to ministers not now con- 
nected, to seek connection at an early date and pay rates. Several reasons might be 
given why this should he done, but perhaps the highest is that it may be a measure of 
unselfishness, which will make them more akin to the Master. Some brother, not so 
well off, may be helped. The Committee intends to adopt means of bringing the matter 
s[)ecially before each Presbytery with the view of securing this desirable result. 



209 



DEFERKED ANNIITY RATES. 



hi obedience to the direction of the General Asaenibly, the Convener prepared a 
:irculiir containing reference to the action of the Assembly, also giving the proposed rates 
with explanations, and addressed a copy of the same to each Clerk of Presbytery from 
Halifax to Victoriaf, and at the same time sent to each Clerk, either by mail or express, 
a piircel of the circulars sutticient to place one copy in the hands of each member of 
I'resbytery, as indicated by the names appearing in the last Blue Book. He also had 
the Kules with all the recent changes printed, and included a sutlicient number with the 
circulars to give one copy to each u.'mister. So far only thirteen Presbyteries have 
reported, as follows : — 

Maitland. — 1. Approves the principle of the scheme. 2. Reconmiends that the 
principle of assessment in proportion to salary be introduced into the scheme, and that 
tht^ amounts above the average rate be devoted to the General Fund. 

Oranoeville. — Approves. 

Keoina. — Approves the Pichenie of annual payments by ministers of the church. 
Thinks that more satisfaction would be given to all parties interested if the age of pay- 
ment of interest be changed from seventy to sixty-five years. 

Melita, Max. — Approves of the Deferred Annuity scheme. Would recommend 
that the maximum age be reduced. 

Triro, N.S. — Recommends the adoption of the scheme of Deferred Annuities. 

St. Joh.n, N.B. — 1. Presbytery approves proposed scheme of Deferred Annuities. 
2. Recommends that arrangements he made by which the annuities would become pay- 
able at sixty-five years of age. 

MiRAMicHi, N.B. — Expressed approval of the Deferred Annuity scheme. 

AuiOMA. — Approved tables for Deferred Aimuity. 

Peterboro. — Approves proposals indicated in the tables, with the following recom- 
mendations : — 1. That sixty-five years be the age fixed for the period of retirement. 
'2. That provision be made for the heirs of a minister who has paid into the contemplated 
fund for some years in case of his decease before reaching the age of retirement. 

Ottawa. — Most heartily approves the scheme. Commends it to favourable considera- 
tion of ministers within its bounds. la of opinion that all members should be re(|uired to 
connect with the Fund at ordination. 



Recommends that the age limit be 



Barrie. — Approves of the table of annuities, 
reduced from seventy to sixty-five years. 

LoM»ox. — Approves of the general principle of the proposed scheme, but in the 
meantime draws the attention of the Convener of General Assembly's Committee to the 
fallowing uncertainties in the details : — What if the minister be laid aside through 
intirmity before he reached the age of seventy 'i Will lie receive only from interest on 
HMdowment and congregational contributions ? What provision is made in such cases ? 
When ministers connect with the plan of Deferred Annuities, the rates of what age will 
ho be expected to pay ? At his age of ordination, or his age at entering. Will the rates 
l>i' retroactive, or will they begin at the time of entering '. 

ToRON'i ■ - Presbytery expresses its approval of the plan. 

Ill view of the fact that only thirteen clerks of Presbyteries have sent in replies 
rtspecting the finding of Presbyteries, while the Committee has reason to believe that a 
Li'iud many Presbyters above the thirteen reported, had tho matter under consideration, 
'he Committee resolved to recommend that the consideration be allowed to str.iid over 
riir another year in the expectation that a more general return may be had from the 
other Presbyteries. 



210 



>\\ 



m\ 




While making this reoommendation the Committee would call attention to the fact 
that in aeveral instances, as will be seen from the condensed replies from Presbyteries, 
consideration has been given and reoommendation made on points not included in the 
matter sent down by the Assembly. It may be stated that the question of reducing the 
age of retirement from 70 to 05 cannot lie considered in connection with rates tixed 
absolutely for the higher age. If the age is to be reduced from 70 to 65, it will mean a 
large increase in the rate for the deferred annuity. 

In regard to other points raised in some of the replies, as for example the asseHs- 
ment between larger and smaller stipends, and what is to be done in the case of 
ministers who may die or retire before reaching the age of 70, they need not be dis- 
cussed in this report, but if the Presbyteries have enough interest in the Fund to 
consider the question and see that a finding is sent in, the Convener will be glad tu 
throw all the light he can upon the several points raised. 



RespectfuHy submitted. 



J. K, MACDONALD, 

Conrener. 



Note. — Since the report was in type returns has been received, through Dr. Warden, 
from the Presbyteries of Kingston and Saugeen. 




i ; ' : 



211 



to the frtct 
^•byteries. 
^ed in the 
ducing the 
*t«8 fixed 
•^I mean a 

^he asseHfi- 
case of 
ofc be dis- 
Fund to 
be glad to 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE AGED AND 
INFIRM MINISTERS' FUND (EASTERN SECTION) 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31st, 1900. 



The Committee, in presenting their annual report, deaire to express their gratification 
with the beneficial effects of the Fund. Their only regret is that the year closed with a 
comparatively large adverse balance. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 







Receipts. 

Collections from congregations 9I<671 18 

Rates from Ministers 632 34 

Interest 1,526 63 

Hymnal Committee ;182 85 

Btlance due Treasurer, April 2nd , 1900 669 35 

Ex})4>.nd!hire , 

Balance due Treasurer, April 4th, 1899 $i32 19 

Annuities 4,443 33 

Printing 10 50 

Proportion uf Agent's salary and general expenses 260 00 

Stationery 2 28 

Commission on collections 10 35 

Interest paid other schemes 23 60 



$4,882 25 



|!4,882 25 



The year's work closed with a balance due Treasurer of $669.35. The revenue 
remained almost exactly what it was during the preceding year, whereas the amount paid 
in annuities in 1899-1900 was $558 in excess of the year before. 

The contributions from congregations are encouraging, showing an increase of $310.19 
over the previous year. The number of ministers who paid rates was 138 ; number in 
arrears, fourteen ; total, 152, being an increase of six for the year. The rates from 
ministers, however, were $335.71 less than what was paid during the year before. The 
explanation of this is that during some years large arrears are paid up. 

As the present sources of revenue of the Fund may be approximately determined, it 
is only too evident that unless a change be introduced, the Fund munt become embarrassed. 
Two courses are open. One is to cut down the annuities one-quarter. The suggestion 
has only to be made to be rejected as unworthy of the Presbyterian Church. Those who 
know best the character of the work accomplished by those on the list feel how inade- 
quate the present annuity-scale is. It must not be less. It ought to be more. 

The other course open is to raise the rates for ministers. At present the average is 
less than $5. The average contributed by congregations is $10.50. Both of these 
might be raised fifty per cent, without burdening any one. The result would be that, 
with the increase of capital proposed by the Century Fund (viz., $12,000), the needs of 
this Fund would be fully met. We must be prepared for a lengthening list of aimuitanta, 
as the balance between additions to the list and removals will probably nut be reached 
for some years. The Committee are not prepared to ask the Assembly to legislate at the 



212 



w 





flu 




present time, but desire that the Church should be ac(|Uainted with the condition and 
prospects of the Fund, and at the rii^ht moment devise a way by which it will l>« 
delivered from the suggestion of instability. 

The number of annuitants at present is twenty-six. Following is the list, and the 
amount paid to each : — 

Rev. .lames Bennett, D.D 8200 00 

" Lewis Jack 200 00 

" W. S. Darragh 200 00 

" Thomas Nicholson 200 00 

" Alexander Cameron 200 00 

" John Cameron 200 00 

" Peter Lindsay 200 00 

" Alexander McLean, D.D 200 00 

" James M. G. McKay 200 00 

" Kenneth McKenzie 200 00 

" E. R<)bert8 (15 00 

" Alexander McRae I.*i0 00 

" William Maxwell 200 00 

" J. D. McGillivray 200 00 

" Alexander Grant 180 00 

" James Murray 200 00 

" Isaac Murray, D.D 200 00 

" H. B. McKay 200 00 

" Gavin Sinclair 35 00 

" J. W. Nelson 50 00 

" T. G. Johnstone 200 00 

" F.W.George 100 00 

" Henry Crawford 200 00 

" Allan Simpson *250 00 

" Duncan McKinnon 183 .S3 

" W. H. Ness 50 00 

$4.443 .33 
•Annuity for fifteen months. 

Applications for leave to retire from the active duties of the ministry, and to he 

E laced for benefit on the Fund, have been received from two ministers through the I'res- 
ytery of Truro. 



Name. 


Presbytery . 


Aoe. 


Years of 
Service. 


Reasons for 
Retiring. 


Rev. Wni. H. Ness 


Truro 


47 

72 


lOf years 

46 years 


General debility. 
Age. 


" James Maclean . . . 


Truro 








The Committee agreed to recommend that an annuity of $100 be granted to Mr. Neas 
from October 5th, 1899 ; also that the full annuity be granted to Mr. Maclean from the 
date of his retirement from active duties. 

The Rev. D. McLeod, Borrowston, C.B., asks leave to unite with the Fund asacon- 
tributing member. Date of ordination. May, 1894. The Committee recommend that 
the application be granted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ANDERSON ROGERS, Convener. 



edition hikJ 
it will i,e 

l«t, and the 



213 



MINISTERS' WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' FUND, 
(WESTERN SECTION). 



To the Venerable (he General Aatemhly : 

Your C'ominittci' regret to rt'port that the income of the year was $2,625 
less than the exin'nditiin'. Tlic yrar lu'^ran with a halance on hand of 11,091.71 ; 
it ends with a deficit of S^l. •■);>:?. 7o. 'I'iic (•(mgrepitioiiai (•<)iitrii)iitions amounted to 
$6,453.62, being an increase of $2^1 over tiiose of the preceding year. Th« 
receipts show a decrease hotii in interest receivable and in ministers' rates, 
amounting together to $1,356. This, however, was expected as intimated in 
the report to hvst Assembly. For the last two or three years, the amount 
derivable from ministers' rates has been j^reatly in excess i>f the average amount, 
because of the fact that many ministers who formerly were not connected with 
the Fund, have in recent years united with it, paying up the arrears to enabl* 
them to do so. 

Your Committee last year reported to the Assembly that, owing to the 
exceptionally large number of deaths in the ministry, the annuities had greatly 
increased, and from the aecoinpanying linaneial statement it will be seen that the 
amount paid for the year just ended, lias been upwards of f 1,000 in excess of the 
previous year. If the annuities are to be continued on their present scale, an 
increase of at least fifty jter cent, in the revenue derivable from congregations will 
be required. It ought not to be a <lillicult matter to obtain from so numerous and 
so wealthy a constituency the comparatively small sum of $10,000 per annum, the 
amount required from congregations, to aid in providing a comfortable mainten- 
ance for the widows of those ministers who served the Church faithfully in the 
earlier years of the settlement of the countrj. Your Committee are satisfied that 
if ministers and Sessions present the claims of this Fund to their congregations, and 
give them the opportunity of contribnting. the amount needed can be got without 
much effort. They regret to report that uj)wards of 300 congregations in the 
western section of the Church failed to contribute anything last year toward thi» 
Fund, and they ask the General Assembly to call the special attention of Presby- 
teries to this fact, so that steps may be immediately taken to secure from every 
congregation a contribution toward the Fund. 

Your Committee, after consideration, decided, notwithstanding the shortage in 
the Fund, to pay the annuities in fulTand to appeal to the congregations of the 
Church for a special collection in the month of May. It is hoped that the response 
will be such as to remove the entire indebtedness. The Committee feel, however, 
that it is undesirable to repeat special appeals of this kind, and they express th» 
earnest hope that Sessions will see to it that the claims of this Fund are considered 
when missionary money is being allocated, so that the Committee may be able in 
ftiture years to meet in f\ill the annuities. Instead of reducing them to bring them 
within the limits of an inadequate revenue. 

The following have been added to the list of annuitants during the year : — 
Mrs. William Donald, California, U.S. ; Mrs. Mary Duff, Brantford, Ont. ; Mrs. 
John M. Munro, London, Ont. ; Mrs. Mark Turnbull, Victoria Harbor, Ont. ; 
Mrs. Alexander Young, Nanaimo, B.C., Mrs. A. D. Macdonald, Seaforth. 



c- 



^ '.- '■": •* 




* I ['.i 



v.. 



214 



The list of auDuitaats at present is as follows :— 



Mn. Adams. Mrs. Gibson. Mrs. Munro. 


*' Anderson. ' 


* Gordon. ' 


' Mutch. 


" Baikie. < 


» Graham. ' 


' Need ham. 


«« Barron. * 


' Gray. * 


' Nichol. 


« Beattie, C. A. < 


' Hall. ' 


' N orris. 


«' Bethune. ' 


' Hislop. ' 


' Priugle. 


«< Beattie, E. ' 


' Irvine. * 


' Park. 


«« Bickell. ' 


' Jamieson. * 


Porteous. 


<' Binnie. ' 


' Johnston. * 


Robertson, S, 


<* Black. ' 


» Kellogg. * 


Robertson, E. H 


** Boyd. ' 


' Lawrence. ' 


Robertson, 8. JI. 


<' Brown. ' 


' McArthur. * 


Reuuelson. 


<« Bouchard. ' 


* McConechy, E. * 


Reid, W. 


** Builder. ' 


' McCouechy, J. ' 


liose. 


«« Burns, R. P. ' 


* McCouuell. ' 


Ross. 


" Breckenridge. * 


* McKerucher. ' 


Riddell. 


" Bursou. • 


♦ McDouuld. • 


Richards. 


** Chestnut. • 


« McFaul. « 


Reid, E, 


•« Campbell. ' 


« McKay. ' 


Scott, J. 


•* Cochrane. ' 


' McKeuzie, 0. ' 


Scott, M. 


" Coutts. ' 


* McKenzie, M. ' 


Simpson. 


«« Craigle. ' 


* McKibbin, « 


Skinner. 


«• Craw. ' 


* McKiunou, A. C. * 


Smith, J. 


'< Currie, J. • ' 


• McKinuon, E. J. ' 


Smith, E. 


" Currie, A. * 


* McLachlan. " 


Stewart, E. 


Miss Christie. < 


' McLean, J. " 


Stewart, H. M. 


Mrs. Dewar. * 


' McLeod. " 


Smellie. 


" Donald. * 


' McCuUoch. " 


Thomson. 


*' Drummond. * 


* McLean, C. " 


Turnbull. 


«' Duflf. ' 


* McLennan. ' 


Walker. 


*• Freeman. ' 


» McMillan. ' 


Wallace. 


" Ferguson, A.J. * 


• McKechnie. " 


Wellwood. 


'» Frazer, C. ' 


' McQueen. * 


Watson. 


" Fraser, J. ' 


' Malcolm. * 


Wilson. 


" Ferguson, IT. E. ' 


* Matthews. ' 


Young, A. 


" Flett. ' 


' Meldrum. ' 


Young, W. 0. 


" Geggie. ' 


' Monteith. 




" Grant. ' 


' Milne. 


t 


All of which is respectfully 


submitted. 

JOSEPH HENE 


»ERSON, 

Convener. 



Toronto, May 16th, 1900, 



1)^. 



215 



MINISTERS' WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' FUND, SYNOD 
OF THE MARITIME PROVINCES. 



., s. 



The Committee of the Ministers' Widows' and Orphans' Fund of the Synod of 
the Maritime Provinces beg leave to report as follows : — 

The receipts during the year ending March 81st, 1900, have been :— 

Ministerial rates, flues, etc $1,965 08 

Collections, donations and legacies 752 61 

Interest and dividends 4,185 59 

Building society accumulations 700 36 

Rights sold in new issue of Bank of Nova 

Scotia stock, not taken up 161 00 

r $7,764 64 

The expenditures have been : — 

Annuities to Widows and Orphans $3,662 18 

Salaries of secretary and treasurer 400 00 

Current expenses 65 28 

$4,127 46 

Leaving a balance of $3,637 18 



to be added to capital. The assets of the Fund amount at date to $112,291.87, as 
against $108,334.62 last year, showing an increase of $3,956.75. This is a very 
considerable advance on last year, and evidences a condition of the Fund which 
should be highly gratifying to all interested in it. 

One beneflciarj'^ has died during the year — Dr. T. Duncan, of Bridge of Weir, 
Scotland, leaving a widow to be added to the number of annuitants. 

The number of widows in receipt of annuity is nineteen, and of orphans 
eleven. 

Since last Assembly six ministprs have connected themselves with the Fund — 
an inconsiderable number — taking everything into account. No doubt the special 
calls made upon the brethren at the present time account to some considerable 
extent for the smallness of the number becoming beneficiaries, and when this 
pressure is removed an increase may be anticipated with some measure of con- 
fidence. But the Committee may be permitted to refer to recent sad instances of 
families of ministers unconnected with the Fund, left with very insufficient 
provision. These, in their judgment, tell but one story and point but one moral — 
namely — that ministers should permit nothing to interfere with their obtaining at. 
the earliest moment the advantages which the Fund offers. 

The Committee, therefore, would continue to urge upon all who are In a 
position to connect themselves with the Fund, to do so without delay, and in wy 
doing they are sure of the Assembly s sympathy aitd support. 

The Committee would close by quoting the words of an esteemedbrother, 
written on the occasion of the remittance of his anuv^al rate, and without any 
thought of publication, and which they would urge the younger brethren uncon- 
nected with the Fund seriously to consider — " I rejoice in the prosperity of th» 
Fund. I have been paid over and over for all I have put into it in having^ th» 
security of provision for any I might leave helpless in the world." 




216 



It r I ■ 



i\ ■' 



The list of aniiuitautH is as follows : — 



Mrs. J. T. Blair. 

" O. M. Clark. 

'* T. Duncan. 

" A. Furqnharsou. 

" Allan FrastT. 

" Jas. FrasiT. 

" J. Oc'ddie. 



Mrs. A. Glcndinning. 






E. Grant. 
8. Johnston. 
P. Keay. 
J. Law. 
R. McCunn. 
J. C, Meek. 



All which is respectfully submitted. 
R. LAING, Chairman, 



Mrs. W. Murray. 

" J. D. Paterson. 

" M. Stewart. 

'• W. Tiiorburn. 

'< A. L. Wyllic. 
Rev. J. W.McLcod's orjihau!- 



THOS. SEDGWICK, Sein-etarij. 



MIN 

CO 

D 

roll bj 

Mrs. 

Torun 

Thonii 

two, 

Mrs. 




% 



]' 



i 



• ' S.' ' 



II- 

fei 
m 



11 



217 



MINISTERS' WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' FUND IN 
CONNECTION WITH THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND. 



During the past year the names of four annuitants were removed from the 
roll by deuth, viz., Mra. John Campbell, Mrs. John Smith, Mrs. MaoMurchy and 
Mrri. J. B. >Iuii-. There were added to the list, Mrs. Chtirles Campbell, of 
Toronto, Mrs. William Clt'hmd, of Toronto, Mrs. T. G. Smith, of Kingston, and 
Thoniiw McMurchy, of Liudsuy— leaving the number of auuuitantH as before->forty- 
two, UH lollows : — 



Mrs. 


Uiirr. 




Mrs 




Bell. 




(( 




Bennett. 




(< 




Brown. 




(< 




Canii)hell 


(Chas.) 


(C 




Canning. 




" 




Cariniehael. 


Mac 




Cleland. 




Mrs 




Cochrane. 




u 




Eakiu. 




(( 




Fraser. 




il 




Gordon. 




Mr. 




Herald. 




Mrs 




Hunter. 




(1 



Jenkins. 

Livingstone (M. W.) 

Livingston (P. 8.) 

MacKay (W. E.) 

MacKay (Alex.) 

Mr -kerraa. 
Macdonnell children. 

Maclean. 

Mttchuirin. 

Maclennan. 

Mucleod. 
Mr. MacMurchy (Thoe.) 

Miller. 

Milligan. 



Miss Mnir. 
Mrs. Murray. 

Morrison. 

Neill. 

Nicol. 

Porteous. 

Ross. 

Simpson. 

Sinclair. 

Skinner. 

Smith (T. O.) 

Smith (J. 0.) 

Stewart. 

Wallace. 



(( 
(< 
<i 
<i 
<< 
It 
(( 
<t 
II 
II 
II 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS. 
Receipts. 

Balance from last year $3,910 93 

Interest from investments 6,074 59 

Ministers' contributions 868 00 

Congregational collections 864 17 

Loans repaid 15,500 00 




126,517 69 



Diabursementa. 

Annuities to widows and orphans $8,013 16 

Re-invested in mortgages 12,500 00 

General expenses of management, 12 mouths .... 495 17 

Sundries, taxes, repairs to property, etc 173 85 

Balance in the Merchants' Bank of Canada 5,335 51 



$26,617 6» 



Aaaeta. 
Mortgages on real estate $98,950 



00 



89 shares corporation 7 per cent. @ $175 6,825 00 

Cash in the Merchants' Bank 5,335 51 

Interest receivable to June 1st, 1900 806 88 

Lachine property valued at 8,000 00 



$114,916 >» 



Audited and found correct. 

PHILIP S. ROSS, 

Chartered Aooountant. 

Montreal, May iBnd, 1900, 



JAMES CROIL, Secretary-Treaturtt, 

ROBERT CAMPBELL, 

Chairman. 



. >• 



218 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON THE DI8TRIHUTI0N OK 

PROBATIONERS. 



ll 



Jo the Venerable the General Assembly of the Preibyteriau Chunk in Canatia, met in Halifax, 
/untf /goo. 

nurinjf the year lliere were Iwi-niy-nine names nn the roll of Prohalioners. Of tliesf, 
five have obtaimul setliemfnts, four as pastors of re^fiilar i-harjfi'H. ami oiio as an Orilainod 
Missionary. Two were droppeil throujfli expiry of time. Of the twenty-nine, the Presby- 
tery of Hamilton forwarded and certified three ; Maitlaml, Sarnia, Harrie, Toronto and 
Montreal two each ; Melita, Rejfina, Brandon and St. John, New Brunswick, all lying- out- 
side the field of your Committees operations, one each ; one was a returned Missionary, 
certified by the Forei^fn Mission Committee, and one who was settled shortly after his 
name appeared, do not produce a Presbyterial certification. The I'resbyteries of Lonilon, 
Peterboroujfh, Saufjeen, Brockville, Ott.iwa, Ciueiph, Chatham, Ni.rth Bay, Cllengarry and 
Lindsay (10) sent one each. Twenty Presbyteries of the twenty-seven with which your 
Committee are charged, sent in the names of men wishing employment, so that it will be 
seen that whether they avail themselves or not of the supply at disposal, the medium of the 
Committee is widely accepted for the emploj ment of ministers not in charge in the 
vacancies of the Western Section of the Church. 

The number of Sabbaths each Quarter, for which employment was procured for Prob.i- 
tioners, varied from five to eight. There is reason to believe that most of these received 
appointments to vacancies on direct and personal application, either to Moderators of 
Sessions, or the Convener of the Home Mission Committee in the bounds. 

Your Committee are of opinion that the indefinite expression, " for full or partial 
supply," occurring in the regulation requiring .ill Presbyteries to report their vacancies, 
should be made more definite — in fact, they could scarcely be more indefinite--and Presby- 
teries avail themselves of this in sonio cases, comparatively few, however, by applying for 
appointments so low as two or three n the Quarter, some for four. It is thought that the 
old practice of leaving vacancies to obtain one-half of their supply, and the Committee 
authorized to send one-half, would bv just to all parties ; would be an encouragement for 
some to go upon the list that now withhold their names ; and would give those looking out 
for settlement a better opportunity of knowing the resources of the Church for pulpits that 
are vacant. 

The eagerness of settled ministers, even of some who have not been long in charge, to 
obtain a hearing in vacancies, has not exhausted itself. Very many examples of the kind 
have come to the knowledge of your Committee in the past year. .\ widespread spirit of 
restlessness still prevails ; and there is ground for the apprehension that this interferes with 
that close and diligent and successful application to the Master's work that is expected of 
every one who thinks he has heard the M.ister's voice in the call to which he has responded, 
and seen the Master's hand guiding him to the field of labor he has been led to choose; and 
with that attachment and confidence, and earnest, zealous co-operation which should be 
extended to the minister by all the office-bearers, members and adherents, whether young 
or old, to the oversight of whose souls he has devoted himself. In fact, this spirit of rest- 
lessness has become the normal state of the Church, and is so very different from what 
prevailed in the days when, as some of us are disposed to say, it was better with us in this 
respect than it is now. 

In the course of the year 10.5 vacancies were reported, the greatest number of which, 
fifteen, were by the Presbytery of Hamilton ; the second, eight, by that of Ottawa ; the 
third, seven, by Guelph (which, in most instances, took one-half supply) ; the fourth, Peter- 
borough, six ; Montreal, Lindsay, Toronto, Barrie, five each, and the others in smaller 
numbers down to one, as in the case of Quebei-, North Bay, etc. 

Some Presbyteries do not acknowledge the circular issued every quarter to collect 
information regarding the number and circumstances of vacant charges. In the Scheme 
for the quarter, January to March, seven examples of this occur, namely, the Presbyteries 



■{^ 



219 



X OF 



of Lanark ami Ronfrt-w, Brockvillo, Kin^fNton, StrHtfortI, Iliiron, Briik.o ami At{;oma. 
Soim'linu'Ji llio aii^wt-r comes after iho tuertin>; of llu- I'oniiuillet', alihoti(;h di'tinil«- insirm.-- 
lions are jfivcn that this shoiiiil be done three weeks before the close of the (jiiarter - a date 
which is certainly known by those upon whom the duty of replying devolves. 

An excuse for not receiving supply for one or other of the quarters, made by some 
Picshyteries, is that the vacancy is about to call, or has called. Hy one l'r«'sbylery a 
cliarf^e was reported as havinif called, and was reckoned by the Committee out of supply 
ill ilieir distribution. The sante Presbytery reporletl it the loilowin^' ipiarleras sii'l vacant, 
aiul il was taken intt) account for the proportion of supply to be assigned. In the opinion 
of your t'ommiltee, a charf^e without a slateil minister or supply shoulil be re^ariled as n 
A'//i» //(/f vacancy up to the acceptance of a lall that has been extemled, ami the tiale fixed 
(or the settlement, and let it be left to Probationers who may be appoinlcil to ileiiile v hellier 
tli(>y will take the work Hssif<ned them or not. Kven the holding' of the moderation in a 
c;ill should not irxdude him if he sees proper to )fo. 

At the meelinjf of the last (leneral .Assembly, the Committee that h.iil been appointed 
on Results, reported on the "Remit ;r .Supply of X'acancies " that the returns by Presby- 
trries showed that thirteen approveil of il ; three approvei! of il in part, while I'iffht disap- 
proveil. The other I'resbyteries not reportinjf, whereupon it w.is decided that no action 
should be l.tken on the Remit. 

At the same lime there was produced an Overture from the Presbytery j>f .Saujjeen on 
ilu- same subject. Both the Remit and the Overture were placed in the hamis of your 
I'oniniillee, but without any instructions as to what should be done with them. 

In the Re|H)rt last year, a scheme for the supply of vacancies was proposed, ;tnd was 
sent to a Special Committee of .Assembly, appointed by the Miulerator, with instructions to 
ri'|iort Hi a later sederunt. So far as appears from the minutes, that Conunillee iliti not 
report ; and accordingly, your Committee now reprothice the scheme, which has been care- 
fully examined and consitlereil by them, and which they re^faril as deservinjf of a favour- 
able reception and adoption on your part, which they accordingly recommend. 

I.— CO.MMITTKE. 

1. That a Committee on the supply of vacancies be appointed for the Western Section 
of the Church, including the Provinces of Quebec and Ontario, it not beinjf possible to 
iiu-lude the districts of tiie Maritime Provinces, Manitoba and British Columbia on accoimt 
of ihe extent of territory over which they spread, ami other )feo>fraphical consiileralions. 

2. That this Committee shall consist of five members appointed annually b_\' the 
Cieneral .Assembly, so chosen as to entail the least expense consistent with efliciency. 

3. That it shall be the duty of this Committee to meet .-it least quarterly for preparmg' 
and publishing a quarterly scheme of distribution and the discharge o( other competent 
business. 

4. That they shall call for and receive from Presbyteries in the Section reports of the 
names of all vacancies in their bounds prepared to call, and the nantes of Licentiates and 
.Ministers without charges desirous of employment among these vacancies. 

5. That' in preparing the roll of Licentiates and Ministers without charge applying for 
:i|>pointments, care shall be exercised to have il composed only of such as ;ire likely to be 
called, and for this purpose it shall be competent for them to decline the immediate inser- 
tion of any name that may be lorw;. led if, in their judgment, there is good reason for 
doing so ; but that they communicate to Ihe Presbytery their reasons for their action, and 
on reply from them may reconsider their decision and either change or reafiirm it — all such 
cases to be reported to the Assembly. 

6. That each Licentiate or Minister may have his name continued for appointments 
two years from the date of its insertion on the roll, when it shall be dropped, unless 
satisfactory reasons can be assigned for its being retained for a longer period. 

7. That in making distribution the Committee shall observe such order as is most 
likely to secure a hearing for the probationers in all the vacancies, thus giving the 
opportunity of mutual acquaintance. 

IL-PROBATIONERS. 

1. That the roll of probationers shall consist of all Licentiates and Ministers without 
charge, certified by Presbyteries and accepted by the Committee. 

2. That in the order of names a distinction shall be made between licentiates and 
ministers, the first place being assigned the latter. 

3. Probationers will be expected to fulfil the appointments given them, unless relieved 
by the Presbytery to whose bounds they are sent, notice of such relief to be at once sent 
to the Committee who may appoint others in their places. 

4. Probationers against whom complaints may be lodged for not fulfilling thei 



^w\ 



m 




220 



I'll 1 1 '• ■ '■ *' 



. fc'- 




*- 




appointments, for inefficiency or unacceptableness, shall have their appointments withheld 
or withdrawn, intimation of this to be sent to them and to the Presbytery certifying^ them. 

5. Probationers are required to acknowledge the receipt of the list of appointments for 
the quarter by the first post, and to apply at once to the Conveners in charge of vacancies 
in Presbyteries for their appointments in the bounds. 

6. In accepting a call probationers shall at once give notice to the Convener of the 
Committee, and to the Presbytery's Convener in charge of vacancies within whose bounds 
he has been assignea. 

7> Unless in exceptional cases probationers are to remain in the vacancy through the 
week, and undertake such pastoral work as may be required by the Session. 

III. PRESBYTERIES. 

1. Three weeks before the close of each quarter Presbyteries shall, through tlie 
Convener of their Committee on the supply of vacancies, report to the Convener of the 
Assembly's Committee vacancies in their bounds prepared to call for at least one-half 
supply, Sabbaths of the quarter. 

2. That they report the names of all Licentiates open to appointments at the time of 
licensing them, and the names of Ministers applying for work, but these shall be only of 
such as have had stated charge of congregations in their bounds for a period of not less 
than four years, unless in some special cases. 

3. That a name which has once appeared on the roll shall not be admitted a second 
time unless the person has withdrawn to engage in Mission work under a Presbytery, or 
the Home Mission Committee, or from some special reason. 

4. The attention of Presbyteries is called to the regulation in force that "Students 
shall not be employed to fill the pulpits of congregations prepared to call, except in cases 
of special emergency ; nor shall ministers in settled charges be employed to the exclusion 
of thof-" on the Roll of the Committee, except by special permission of the Presbytery, 

5. fhat in making application for supply each quarter Presbyteries shall have 
opportunity of stating objections to the appointment of any probationer on the list, and 
shall send the same to the Committee for their consideration. 

IV.— REMUNERATION. 

That the following rate of remuneration be required for the services of each proba- 
tioner per week with board ; 

In vacanciesjn which the salary paid the former pastor was from ?800-$l,000. $10 

$1,000-81 ,500.. 815 
$l,500-$2,000..$20 
$2,000 and up- 
wards $25 

The annexed Appendices I. and II. contain as full and detailed information as your 
Committee are prepared to give in respect to vacancies and their settlement. Probation- 
ers and their settlement, in such cases as any have occurred. 






(< 
(I 



All of which is respectfully submitted, 
GuELPH, A/a^'jt/i, /goo. 



ROBERT TORRANCE, 



PRE9BY1 



Quebec 
Montreal 



Ottawa 



Lanark an 
Brockvill' 

Glengarr; 



Kini^stbn 
Peterbor 



Cohvenet: 



Whitby 
Lindsaj 



Toront 



Orang 
Barrii 



221 



Appendix I.— VACANCIES AND SETTLEMENTS, 1899-1900. 



rRESBVT£KIES. 



Quebec . 
Montreal 



Ottawa 



Laaark and Renfrew 
Brockville 



Glengarry . . . , 



Kin£;st^n., 
Peterboro . 



Whitby 
Lindsay 

Toronto 



Orangeville. 
Barrie 



CONORKOATIONS. 



Heechbridge 

Muutreal, Si. Matthew's Ch . 

St. Lambert 

Montreal, 8t. Marks 

Hemmingford 

Manotiokand South Gloucester 
Nipean, Bell's Corners and 

Skead's Mills 

Filzroy Harbor and TarboUon 
Campbell's Bay, Bryeon and 

Lower Litchfield 

Bristol 

East Gloucester 

Billing's Bridge 

Osgood and Kenmore 

Rosebank and Clayton 

Pakenham 

Renfrew, St. Andrew's Cliuroh 
Brockville, 1st Presbyteriin Ch 

Winchester, 2nd 

Oxford and Bishop's Mills. . . . 

Merriokville and Jasper 

St. Andrew's Church, Lancaster 



* Roxhorouuh 

Kingston, Cooke's Church. 
Port Hope, First Church . , 
Omemee and Lakevale .... 



Canipbellford 

Laketield and North Smith . . 

Cobourg 

Port Hope " 

St. John's Port Perry 

Dunbarton and MelvilleChurch 

Scarborough 

Fenelon Falls 

Sonya 

Cannington 

Eldon 

Lotneville 

Dunn Avenue 

Cualmers' Church 

Milton. Knox Church 

Sutton, etc 

Toronto, St. James' Square . . 

Shelburne 

Grand Valley and South Luther 

Claude and Mayfield 

Bank's and Gibraltar, St. An 

drew's 

Airlie, Blackband and Banda. 



Put on 
List. 



July, 



Oct., 

Jan., 
July, 



Jan., 
April, 

(C 

Oct., 

1 1 
It 

July, 

• t 

t( 

Oct., 

April 
Oct., 
Jan., 



Oct., 

April, 
i * 

i( 
Oct., 

Jan., 
(i 

July, 
Jan., 

April, 
Oct., 
Jan., 
April, 



1899 
1899 

1899 
1899 
19(»0 
1899 

1899 
1899 

1899 
19W 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 

1900 
1899 
1899 
1899 

1899 
1900 

i;m 

1900 
1899 



May 22, 1900 

July 25, 1899 
Jan. 4, 1900 
May 11, 1900 



Sbttlrd. 



Nov. 23,1899 
Jan. 4, 1900 



Oct. .3, 1899 
Dec. 7, 1899 



A. King, M. A . . 
j.A.Moir, L.LB. 



Nov. 28, 1899 
Nov. 23, 1899 
Feb. 1, 1900 
Sept. 6, 1899 



Feb. 13, 1900 



Mar. 27,1900 
Aug. .30, 1899 
July 20, 1899 

Jan. 18, 1900 



Mimsters, 



G.F.Kinnear,B.A 
E. A. McKenzie, 
B.D. 



Hugh Ferguson. . 

R.\Vhillan9,M.A. 
J.D.Morri8on,BA 
J. T. Scrimger . . 



.L R. Conn 

Robt. Young . . . 
John Hay, B.D. 
Robert Laird . . . , 



VV. M. Fee... 
J. N. Tanner. 



Alex. Laird. ... 
A.G.Smclair,B.A 
\Vm. McKanna- 
win, B. A. 
A.C. Reeves, B. A. 



May 1, 1900. \V. W. McCuaig. 
Nov. 7, 1899 W. Cooper 



Oct. 26, 1899 



July, 
Oct., 

April, 



1900 
1899 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1899 
19(X) 
1900 
1900 

1900| 

1899;Oct. 17, 1899 
1899 Nov. 18,1899 
1899 



Mar. 20,1900 



1899' July 31, 1899 
....I Aug. .3, 18911 



R. C. H. Sinslair 
b. M. Martin . . . 



R. G. Davey. 



P. W. Anderson. 
R. T. Cock burn . 



R. Borland . . . 
R. McCuUoch. 



"Gaelic it-dispensable. 




« ( 



i^..^:. 



itti 



^1 


■ ^.j 




U- 


« 


1 ;> ' 








'i ^* 


, *^ > 






■-£... 


- 4^^r' 






i 



i^!v 



222 



Appendix I.-VACANCIES AND SETTLEMENTS. -C<>«/i«w<r</. 



Presbyteries. 



Bjirrie 

Owen Sound 
Saugeen . . . , 
Guelph 



Hamilton. 



Paris . 



London . 



Sarnia . 



Chatham. 



COKOKEOATIONS. 



Lake 



Allandale 

Stayner and Sunnidale 
Bradford, etc.. . . . . 

Sarawak, Kemble and 

Charles 

One vacancy, name not given, 

reported for second quarter, 
St. Andrew's Church, Berlin. . 

Knox Church, Guelph 

Knox Church, Elora 



Jan., 

April, 

July, 



Put on 
List. 



1900 
1900 
1900 

1899 



Aug., 1898 



Waterloo 

Hespeler 

Knox Church, Dracon, and 

Melz 

St. John'o Church, Garafraxa 

and Mimosa 

Port Colborne 

Knox Church, St. Catharines 

Caledonia 

Dunvilie . 

St. David's 

Haynes Ave., St. Catharines.. 

Binbrook and Saltfleet 

Blackheath, E. Seneca and 

Abingdon 

Strabane and Kilbride 

Bridgeburg and Fort Erie 

Pelham and Louth 

Nelson and Dundas Streets. . . 

Beverley 

Drummondhill and Chippawa. 
Erskinc Church, Hamilton. . . . 
Brantford, St. Andrew's Cli . . 
Ayr, Stanley Street Church . . 
Mount Pleasant and Burford. . 
East Oxford and Blenheim. . . . 

Burns' Church, *Mosa 

Alma St. Church, St. Thomas. 

Glencoe 

Thamesford 

Westminster 

Lobo and Caradoc ... 

Duuwich 

St. Andrew's Ch., Struthroy . . 
Guthrie Ch., Plum Creek and 

Black Creek 

Oil City anr". Oil Springs . . 
Tenth Line, Brook and Inwood 
Tilbury E iit and Fletcher 

Dresden 

Comber and Tilbury 



May, 
July, 

Oct., 
Nov., 



April 
May, 
April, 

July, 



Oct. 

It 

Jan. 



April, 

July, 

(i 

Jan., 

April, 

Jan., 

July, 

Oct., 
II 

April, 



Oct., 

Jan., 

April, 

II 

Feb., 
July, 



Settled. 



Mar. 27,1900 



Aug. 17,1899 



1899 
1899 

1899 
1899 

1899 

1900 
1898 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 

1899 
1899 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1899 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1899 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1899 

1900 
1900 
1900 
1899 
1899 
1899 



Nov. 6, 1899 

Sept. 14,1899 
Jan. 3, 1900 

Feb. 1, 1900 
Jan. 4, 1900 



Ministers. 



H. ?). Cameron. 



G. G. McRobbie, 
Ph.B.,S>>.D. 



W. A. Bradlay, 
B.A. 

R. Wm. Ross . . . 

W. R. Mcintosh, 
B.U. 

J.R.Gilchrist,BA 

R. Pogcn 



Aug. 21,1899 
Sept. 26,1899 
Dec. 14, 1899 
Mar. 14,1900 
Dec. 21, 1899 
Jan. 4, 1900 
Dec. 5, 1899 



Feb. 28, 1900 



A. McLaren 

G.H. Smith, BD. 
D. D. Jviacdonald 

J. Gourlay 

T. R. Robinson.. 
J. L. Murray, Jr. 
Hugh Ross 



P.J. McLaren, B A 



Nov. 7, 1899 J. S. Scott, B. D. 
Jau. 30, 1900 S. 0. Nixon. 



May 15, 1900 



E. C. Gallup 



Oct. 3, 1899 
Aug. 22,1899 
Mar. 1, 1900 



Nov. 30,1899 
April 17,1900 
Oct. 3, 1899 



Isaac Macdonald. 
H. W. Reade.... 
James Wilson. . . 



J. P. McQuarrie, 

N. Lindsay 

A. McGregor 



'Gaelic indispensable. 



^k 



228 



Appendix I.— VACANCIES AND SETTLE MENTS.-tV«//««^(/. 



LISTERS. 



Cameron.. 



^fcRobbie, 
'•B.,S>'.D. 

Bradiay,' " 

b.A. 

Ross . , . 

Wclntoshi 

B.D. 

is'irist.BA 
o 

iren , 

'Jtb.b.ix 
icdonald 

V: 

>bin8on . . 
rray, J,-. 

IS8 

aren,BA 

fc,B."D. 

)n 

up.. . 

lonald. 
de.... 
'son . . . 

arrie, 
r. ... 



PRESBYTfcRIES. 


CONRREOATIONS. 


PrT ON 

List. 


Settled. 


MiNISTEB. 




Botany, McKay's Corners and 
Kent Bridge 


Jan., 1900 
Oct., 1899 
July, 1899 
•• 1899 
Oct., 1899 
April, 1900 
July, 1899 

Oct., 1899 

Jan., 1900 

April, 1899 

•' 1899 

April. 1900 
Oct., 1899 






Stratford 


Jan. 4. 1900 


H. r.nwun. M.A . 


Huron 


Seaforth, First Church 

Brucefield, Union Church .... 

Bayfield and Bethany 

Verna and Blake 






Oct. 18, 1899 


E. H. Sawers. . . . 








Maitland 


Whitcchurch and Langside.. . . 

Krox Church, *flipley and 

Bervie . 














Walton 

Pinkerton and Brant 

Burgoyne and Dumblane 

North Brant and West Bentick 

Salem, Dobbington and Gillis 
Hill, raised from Status of a 
Mission Station at beginning 
of the year 

VVebbwood 






Bruce 


Nov. 7, 1899 
Nov. 1, 1899 
April 3, 1900 


F. 0. Nichoi .... 




8. D. Jamieson. . 
A. Leslie 


Algonia 






North Bay 


No vacancies 















*GaeIic indispensable. 



m 



224 



Appenuix II.— list of PROBATIONERS, 1899-2UOO. 



m'''^- 



hrit 



Probation KRs. 



Hugii Brown 

William Ander80u,M. A. 

George McKay 

J. J. Coohrane, M.A. . .. 

W. T. Noble, B.A 

G. J. A. Thompson 

F. O. Nichol 



10. 
11. 
12. 



13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 

17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 

23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 



8. G. C. Little, B.A.. 



William McKiiy 

A. G. Jansen 

William Morrin 

Gilbert G. McRobbie, 
Ph. B., Sc. D 

W. J. Jamieson 

J. A. McLean 

William Black, B A.... 
S. D. Jamieson 



1- SO 

» a 



London . . 
Pelerboro' 
Maitland 
Barrie . . 



Saruia . 
Melita 



D. B. Marsh, Ph.B . 
Andrew Mucnab, M.A. . 
T. A. Watson, B.A.... 

J. P. Mclnnes 

Thomas Davidson 

C. E. Gordonsmith, 
F.S.Sc 

T. R. Robinson 

J. W. Penman . . . . 

Charles M. Wyse 

Hugh McLellan 

W. F. Orr, M.A 

D. G. Cameron 

J. A. McKenzie 



Toronto . 
Saugeen . 
Hamilton 



Orangeville. 

Rei'd Miss'y 
St.John,N.B 
Ottawa . . 
Montreal. 



Hamilton . . . 
Maitland . . . 

Guelph 

Chatham . . . 
Isorth Bay . 

Glengarry . . 



c 
a 



Settlements. 



Oct., 

(4 

July, 
Oct., 



Jan., 



1897 Time expired . 

1897i Time expired. 

1898 

1898 

1898 

18981 



1899 Pinkerton and Brant, Novem- 
I ber 7ih, 1899 

1899 Ordained Missionary at Cor- 
bettown and Riverview, De 
cember 12th, 1899 



April, 



1899 
1899 
1899 



July, 1899|Sarawak, Kemble and Lake 
Charles, August 17th, 1899. 






Oct., 



Jan., 



1899 
1899! • 
1899 
1899 

1899 
1899 
1899 
1900 
1900 



1900 



Montreal . . . 


Jan., 


1900 


Brandon . . . 


'• 


1900 


Recina 


It 


1900 


Toronto 


<< 


1900 


Hamilton . , 


April 


1900 


liindsay 


(< 


1900 



Burgoyne and Dunblane, No- 
vember Ist, 1899 



St. David's, Dec. 21st. 1899 



>J 



1' 



REPOli 



i '■!:■■ 



m. -■ 



To The r«j 
Yoiiv 



Thest 
ot'NovemI 

This is ^ ^ 

xvevt' poiu 
(jiiestions. 
iudifutiii^ 
veiuembei 

which "1 
asidi". am 
tiiiued, i1 
im\)ortau 
of ri-achii 
the Chur 



All 

done the 

Prcsbyti 

re\iovts 

taction 

these fa 

j)oi'tiou 

mistake 

cUisioui 

ret I u est 

of Scssi 

given 1 

an ind 

encoiu 

under 

BclieiE 

ntuios 

covers 

fove t' 

and ii 

8 



225 



s 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CHURCH LIFE 
AND WORK— JUNE, 1900. 








^^ 1 


m- 



. 1 

1 


ir- 




e- 







• '\< 




fi 


:e 




>. .... 





Tu Tlir Venerable The General Asaembly. 

^■om• Committee on Chureh Lite aud Work begs to report as follows : — 

QUKSTIONS SU UMITTED. 

Tliese, as prepared by the Committee, were .sent to Presbyteries in the month 
ot'November. They have been freely critici/ed by several Sessions and I'resbyteries. 
Tliis is gratifying to the Committee, as it indicates an unusual interest in their 
work. The criticism would be of more use, if the precise defect in the questions 
were pointed out. The Committee would welcome any suggestion of improved 
(jiiestions. Tho.se submitted are commended by some Presbyteries as very suitable, 
iudieating that notwithstanding defects, there is some fitness in them. Let it be 
remembered, that the object of the questions is rather to suggest directions, in 
wliicli " life and work " may be displayed. Any Session is at liberty to put them 
aside, and give its views in its own ways. But if a line of (luestions was main- 
tained, it might in time Lssue in a united policy throughout the Church on 
imi)ortant points of congregational administration. Also, it might be the means 
of reaching that inactive mass, whose sluggishness acts as a drag on the wheels of 
the Church. 

THE REPORTS FROM PRESBYTERIES. 

All the reports received from Presbyteries are excellent. Convenei*s have 
done their work ably and conscientiously. Only about half of the reports from 
Presbyteries were received when this report was begun. This delay in sending in 
reports could probably be overcome by a little exertion. The reports exi)ress satis- 
faetiou with the returns from Sessions in the majority of cases. But, accepting 
tliese favourable statements, they make quite manifest the fact that there is a large 
portion of the Church little interested in her life and work. Two points are un- 
mistakably indicated, from which the General Assembly can draw its own con- 
ehisious, namely, first, that a large number of Sessions still i)ay no attention to the 
re(|ue.st of the Assembly for a report on this subject. Second, that a large number 
of Sessions answer the questions in such a way, as plainly to show, that they have 
given little attention to them, and are little interested in them. These facts are 
an index of the " life aud work " temperature, where they are found, which is not 
encouraging. The questions submitted to Sessions deal with Church life and work 
under four general divisions. Namely : — The Congregation ; the Sabbath ; the 
Schemes ; Social (Questions. Your committee desires to treat the subject with the 
utmost brevity. But it is submitted that a report on Church Life and Work which 
covers so wide a' ^-ritory, requires not only to be condensed, but to be ju.st. There- 
fore the reporttis presented with the consciousness *^hat the task is a difficult one, 
and in reliance on the consideration of the Assembh . 





8 



226 



r\ 











■: •*' 



I 



THE CONGREGATION. 

1. Mention any evidence of favourable or unfavourable conditions of nligi- 
ous life in the congregation. 

The answers (o this question indicate, as we would expect, both favouiable 
and unfavourable conditions. 

The ({uestion is, — Which preponderate throughout the Church ? The answer 
indicated by the reports is, that the evidences of a favourable condition of ri'li>;i(ms 
life ill our congregations, are present to an encouraging extent. These are tiiinn- 
erated, but need not be repeated here as they are familiar to all. The unfavonraljlc 
conditions present are also reported. The Church recognizes her condition, it is 
not the ideal one. That has not been reached in any period. Her story is one of 
conflict. Her course is through a hostile world. Looking at our Church fiom seu 
to sea in all her widely separated and widely scattered congregations, her cxiieri- 
euce at present is that of earnest conflict. There is no outstanding testimony of 
unusual success. There is no evidence of exceptional conditions of religions life. 
There is abundant testimony to the fact that God is in the midst of her. The 
Church is holding her ground. Not indeed satisfied, there is an earnest striving 
after improved conditions, and in this universal consciou.sness of not havins; 
attained, and aspiration after a higher life and larger success, is a great element of 
hope. 

EVIDENCE OF A MISSIONARY SPIRIT. 

1. In the contributions to the Schemes of the Church. 

2. In seeking to gather in the non-church going population in yonr 

neighbourhood. 

Do the contributions of our congregations testify to the presence of the mission- 
ary spirit in tliem ? Undoubtedly they do. The reports are unanimous upon this 
point. We acknowledge with thankfulness the response made to the claims of tiie 
Gospel at lionic and abroad. Many sjjecial calls have been made upon the iieojile 
during the past year. The Century Fund, the Famine Fund, the Patriotic Funds 
have eacli appealed to the sympathies of tlie peoi)le. These in many parts of the 
country have been liberally responded to. It is evident that the religious lifo (if 
the people is manifesting its presence in the support ami dissemination of tiie 
Gosi)el, as well as in deeds of benevolence apart from the work of the Church. .\ 
missionary spirit does exist in the Church. It is present to some extent in all tmr 
congregations. It is more cons})icuous in some than in others. In some it is nuuii- 
festly in its infancy. In all it should be found in larger dimensions. This seems 
to be the substance of the evidence. 

INTEREST IN THE NON-CHURCH GOING POPULATION. 

On this point our Church has not yet adequately fixed its thought. Tiie 
rejtorts are almost unanimous in showing that our congregations do not realize tluir 
obligations to those who are outside of the churches. The Church must grow li'oin 
two sources. The outspreading of her own families, and tlie bringing in of tliose 
who are without. This is home mission work in its true sense. Every cougrej;a- 
tion should mis.sionate in its own territory. This is not felt, nor is it done to any 
noticeal)le extent in the great majority of congregations. It is more attended tn 
and more re([uired in populous centres Zeal and expenditure on distant jilai ts 
.should be accompanied by interest in those in our own neighbourhood who need tlio 
Gos])el. Tiie reports show^ that this view is not prevalent, though there are a U'w 
honoiu'able exceptions. While saying this it is to be borne in miyd, that if not 
directly, yet something is done indirectly in this connection. Also that the 



(in 



^nre oi 



which mign 
.\ny c>| 

1. 1| 

-• M 

On tiiil 

,.„c,mraM:ii>r 

growing \\\ 
irvi'i'oHcc- 

on I'lir not| 
meelinjis, 
wonl :»»'l 
Soini' are il 
subject, ai 
the test in\ 

in Ihif^ 1"^''' 



II IS 

not l>t V 
wiUinmnes 

societies, t 
their altei 
loyalty, 
tioned. ^ 
justly Uor 
from who 
lis follies, 
the attitu 

4. 



This 

fact, tha 

and ivbili 

uf ni-any 

are fuUy 

on the \ 

gations. 

the arm 

are prei 

the Icat 

f(ir a re 

the imi 

and in 

It is be 

of <'>0(l 

liusinc; 

regard 

Mastc] 

hearer 

witli I! 

their ( 

S 

There 



:.i 



227 

|iri--inc of pastoral work in our coiijjregations, hinders etlbrts in tluH direction 
wiiicli might otherwise he made. 

Any fvideiice of growing religious interest among the young as seen 

1. In a spirit of reverence for sacre<l things. 

'2. In loyal supjiort of their own congregation and chiircli interests. 

On tliis .subject the general testimony is encouraging. Indeed tliis is (lie most 
tiifduraging part ofthe reports. It is manifest to all tliai tiic rising generation is 
growing up in an atmos[ihere in wliich it is more dillicult to nuiintain a spirit of 
icvcnncc, than it was in former days. Irn-vcrcnce for sacred things is obtruded 
(III (inr notice at every step, on every side. Even in the churches, in tiu-ir social 
iiifi'lings, and in the uses made of the ciiurciu's, in tlic manner in wliich (iod's 
won! ;ind (rod's servants are treated and .spoken of, it is often painfully exldbited. 
Some are injuriously iiillucnced by it. Son>e reports speak despiuulingiy on the 
suhjtct. and it is a subject the Ciiurch should give attention to, l)Utas stated aliove, 
the testimony given is credital)lc to our young jieople. They are not degenerating 
ill tliis respect so far as the reports show. 

THKIK UoVAI/rV TO TUK CIIIKCH. 



It is also testified that they are loyal to their own church. Why should they 
not 1)( ? When they are not, possibly there is souk; lack in the cluircii. Their 
willingness to aid in all work appropriate to them, their services in tlie various 
societies, their contributions to mi.ssious, and to other objects, their j)rayer nu>etings, 
their attendance on ordinances, all are gratefidly sjtoken of as testifying to their 
loyalty. While rejoicing in this testimony, there is another side sometimes men- 
tioned. Young men do not unite with the Churcii in such numbers as might be 
justly hoped for. Pastors are discouraged at the indilference manifested by those 
tVom whom better things might be expected. The world carries away many into 
its lollies, and estrangement from Christ. But the reports indicate satisfaction with 
the attitude of the young people generally. 

4. Is a kindly interest taken by the elders in the spiritual work of the (Jhurch 
and by the deacons or managers in its financial all'airs? 

This ([uestion was submitte<l in the hope of calling attention to an admitted 
t'aet, that the success of the congregation depends to a large extent on the activity 
and al)ility of the office bearers. The reports unanimously recognize the devotion 
of many of our otlice bearers. Their valued labours and .synipathi<'s in chunth work 
ai'e fidly appreciated. It is also nuide clear that a larger attention to their duties 
on the part of many of them, would greatly cheer our pastors and aid our congre- 
gations. The existing war in Africa has shown very empiiatically how much of 
the army's success depends on its leaders. So in our congregtitions, the jieople 
are prepared to follow intelligent leadershii). and the elder and deacon should be 
the leaders of the people in all good work. The report., iiulicate that tiiere is room 
for a revival in this direction. Not a revival only in prayer or preaciiiug, but in 
the pinictual faithful attention to financial details on the jiart of many nianagers, 
ami in a more active interest in the religious life of the people, on tlu; part of elders. 
It is beyond ((uestion, that if any man in business treated his atlairsas the business 
of (iod's house is treated in many congregations, he would very soon be out of 
husiness. The service of the House of (}od, its providing, should be fir.st in our 
I'euard. The best we can bring to it of talent and labor is expectt'd of us by the 
Master. The Church, it is recognized in the reports, owes much to our ollico 
hearers. Already a great i)Ower to leaven the congregations and the community 
with a right spirit, they have still great and unused opportunities before them in 
their ofiices. 

Such is the testimony of the reports on the subject of the congregations. 
There can be no great change wrought, or visible in one year in them. The work 



I ' 



228 

haH j?ouo forward in faith and in good courage.' The people have taken uj) ihc 
burdens laid upon them with willinj!;nes8. While the reports, in their .sinciiity 
confess shortcomings, there is justly in all a loud note of thanksgiving. 
The second question dealt with is that of 



I' Iv %■ 




2. 



THE SABHATH. 

Any measures taken during the year in support of. 
In wliat special respect violated in your neighbourhood. 
tS. Any suggestion in order to the better maintenance of it. 

The reports received indicate, that except in two places no special nuuisuriS 
have been taken in its support. In tiicse cases appeal was made to the law in it 
defence. The result was not satisfactory. But while no special measures wi-rt' 
called for, every report shows that the ])ulpit has been faithful in testifying on the 
suiyect. They show also a great necessity for this. There is everywhere n con- 
sciousness of danger to the Church from the encroachments being made on tlie day. 
To a great many of our neighbours across the line, it has practically ceased to lie a 
sacred day. The railways of our country use it as they do other days. ]Many jiro- 
fessedly ("liristiau people do not regard it as to be kei)t for religious uses. It is to 
many merely a holiday. Such a condition of things is everywhere felt opeiutini; 
against the teaching of the Church and the religious life of the i)eople. The reporis 
do not present an encouraging view of the situation. They expre.ss auxitty in 
regard to it. They describe the many God defying ways in which it is violated. 
which it is not necessary to enumerate here, butthey are of such a nature as shimld 
rouse the Chunih to action. The Church is the guardian of the day, and our own 
Church is everywhere alive to her duty on the ([uestion. The Oeneral Asscnihly 
has api)ointed a special committee to deal with this subject, from which a rcpuit 
will b(! made. Your committee would call attention to the fact, which should be 
borne in mind in our complaining, that the Sabbath is well observed by our lu'dpit'. 
and there are probably few countries where it is better observed by tlie wliolc 
population than it is in the Dominion. Also that regard for the day as holy, can 
only be exi>ected from those who are alive to spiritual things. Your committee aie 
of opinion, that a united appeal by the principal pastors of all the churches, accom- 
panied by men of standing in the commercial world, made by delegation to tliosc 
corporations which most continuously violate it, might be attempted with success. 
Local elforts are of no avail. The local officers of these corporations are under 
orders, and can do nothing of themselves. The Presbytery of llock Lake recom- 
mends to the General Assembly, "that it use its best efforts to have laws passeil 
in the Parliament of Canada, to prevent any corporation or company from enij)lc)y- 
ing men to do any kind of work, on the Sabbath day, except works of necessity 
and mercy." 

Every congregation whose members are forced to work on Sabbath looks to 
the General Assembly for such protection of their right to a day of i-est, as it can 
secure for them. Your Committee with many of the Presbyteries recognizes witii 
satisfaction the forward step taken by the Lord's Day Alliance in the appointment 
of the Rev. J. G. Shearer as its agent. A fuller statement in regard to this ap- 
pointment, as well as to the whole subject, will no doubt be laid before the Geneiai 
Assembly l)y the committee appointed to deal with it. 

The third division of the questions relates to 

THE SCHKMES. 

To these reference was made under the first question, but here the questions 
deal with details not referred to there. The first point to which attention is 
called is, 



.'■*■ 



.r-%teiS1gS«^^ 



229 



1. Does tho amount contributed to the Schemes of the Chureh Itetir a lair re- 

lation to the means of the people? ' 

The question in intended to call attention to the fact, that there should he a 
liiir proportion between tl)e means of the people and the amount of (heir contrihu- 
tidiis to tlie Schemes. The reports almost without exception answer this (piestion 
in the negative. While the liberality of the peoi)le is gratefully recognized, and 
the exceptional liberality of some congregations is given due credit, yet the (lelib- 
ciatc. judgment of the reports is, that the contributions to the Schemes, in the great 
miijority of our congregations, do not fairly represent the resources of the people. 
This condition is sustained by evidence, patent to every otlice bearer and member 
of llic Church. The scale of contribution is the measure of our interest in the 
l)uilding up of the Chun-h, an*' the extension of the Kingdom of Christ. This 
interest, in too many cases, isn^t so great as it should be, and in too many, seems 
to l»e entirely al>sent. It is true that very good people may not real!/*' the import- 
ance of the Schemes. They may not appreciate colleges sunicieiilly. They may 
not understand the use or need of an Assembly Fuiul. Many do not feel any 
hunlcn even in connection witii missions, home or foreign, hence the snuill contri- 
l)utions. Education in the Schemes is evidently recpiired. It is not only more life 
tliat is needed, but more cultivation and more knowledge. A wise and ellective 
]ihm of instruction on this subject, carried out by each Session, would be of great 
service to the Church. Your Committee ho])es, that the attention of Sessions, 
Deacons' Courts, and Managing Boards, will l)e given to this subject, till a higher 
standard of giving for these objects is attained. 

The second point to wliich attention is called under this head is, 

2. How fully does your method of collecting for these elicit the liberality of 

your congregation ? 

Tlie reports make clear (1) That there is no one; system in use, or found to be 
of universal application. A great variety of methods is employed. ('J) 'That 
methods are in use whicii are confessedly inetlective. In many congregations the 
inctliods do not reach all the possible contributors. {i\) That therefore the 
lilierality of the congregations is not elicited as it might l)e, and the means in the 
congregation is not called ujion as it siiouM be. It is greatly to l)e dei)lored, in 
tile circumstances of our Church, that money vvhicli might l»e, and would be 
given to the cause of Chri.st, is not given, because of the failure of tliose who 
should collect it to seek it in the right way. 

The third point under this division is, 

3. Are there any or many non-contributors to the Schemes in tliu 

congregation ? 

The testimony on this i)oiiit is almost unanimous, namely, that there are ii; 
aUnost all our congregations, noii-contrilmtors to the Schemes, and that the number 
of these in some congregations is large. Also that many of these are found in the 
membership of the Churcli. Some reports say that as many as twenty per cent, of 
tiiose wlio ought to contriiiute, do not do so. In one instance it is said as many as 
lifty per cent, do not contribute. Xor is the cau.se iiialiility to do so. It is the 
alisence of any sense of responsibility or duty in this relation, which appears to l)e 
tile principal cause. Some even who are ollice bearers are found among tlie non- 
contributors. This state of things it is admitted is not creditable to any congrega- 
tion. Your committee believes that by united etlbit on the jiart of iiastors and 
cilice bearers, the number of non-contributors could lie reduced to very small 
dimensions. 

From the testimony of the reports on this subject the treneral Assembly will 
see, that the attention of congregations requires to be directed to the claims which 
tlie several objects included in the Schemes have iij)on the support of the members 
and adherents of the Church. There will remain, no doubt, after all our diligence, 
a portion of the people who will neglect this duty. But a persistent ellbrt should 
be made, in the judgment of your committee, by every congregation to improve 



■'I 
■1 



230 



In t ' 

\l i' . 



u mm 



iifiti 






> t ft 






the mctlj^xls of (■(ilh'cliii^ until tlio Itcst for tlicm is roadicil. And ('_') that iio ccm- 
Ki'CKiitioii should he sutislUtd, until the n(in-<-()ntril)Utory cleini'nt is rcdiu'i-d to a 
uiininiuin. Thw powcu- and usefulness of the Church depends, apart IVoni In r 
spiritual life and aRt'iieies, on the revenue she lirin)^s in to the 'rr»;asury of Cliii-i. 
No aino(Mit of s|)iritual phraseology will nuike up for the ulmeiiee of eonnnon si mm 
in these matters of detail. 

Tlie next dlvi»i«»n of questions deals with 

I'nder this head three important subjects are inquiretl into, mimely, — Tein|iti- 
anee ; the jxtlitieal life of the people, and the eondition of the eonimunity in red r- 
enee to ehastity. 

Under the subject of Temperance, the (irst question asked is, 

I. What is being don(! of a specilie kind to eiK'ourage total abstinence mi 

Clirislian grounds? 

The answers to this tjuestion are encouraging, because they show unmisiukc- 
ably, that all our Sessions regard the practice of total abstinence as one which is 
in harmony with the law of Christ. They inculcate it in all their ministralitpiis. 
and manifestly the great majority of our jtcdple carry out in thi'ir lives this jiriii- 
ciple. Manifestly also, they do so on intelligent grounds. Not because it is niiiilc 
expedient or necessary by any human legislation, but because it is in harnioiiy 
with what they believe to be the teaching of Christ. While this is so, few repuris 
speak of anything of a specilie kind being done to extend the principle. It is tauglil. 
it is exemplilied in jtersonul conduct, it is inculcated on all siiitalijo occasions. The 
young particularly are instructed in it. 'I'he whole inlluence of the Chuuli is 
pressing the duty on the conscience of the peoiile. 

II. What eHbrt is being made to strengthen teniperancfe sentiment in tlic 

community? 

This question is in i)art included in the previous one, aud so far as the reports 
indicate what is being <lone in this direction by the Church is nniinly in the use ol" 
preaching and teaching. Various kinds of temperance so<;ieties, bands of hope, ami 
similar organizations aie also employed. It does not appear that there is at i)rcsciit 
any one common method in use. Xor does it appear that any special attention 
has been given to the subject during the year, excejjt in such localities as luivc 
been engaged in contests for changes in, or enforcement of the law. 

III. The question is a.sked, " Is the lujuor trallic in your district gaining or 
losing in influence. 

It is not .surprising to learn from the reports, that in a great many parts of the 
Church, the trallic is not gaining but rather failing in inlluence. At the same time 
in many reports there is a fear expressed that it is gaining in inlluence. The 
reports take their coUmr from the .state of things in their own locality, as they arc 
expected to do, which fact makes it clear that some parts of the country are mure 
hai)i)ily situated in tliis respect than others, a fact familar to every one. 

It is gratifying to learn, that in some of the newer parts of the Dominion from 
which reports come, the trallic is not regarded as making headway. Temperanci' 
sentiment is growing. This is also true of many of the older sections of the country. 
In not a few districts it is said, the liipior trallic does not exist. The Church every- 
where is against the trallic. So that possibly, with the exception of a few localities, 
taking the whole field into account, and recognizing fully the great power which 
the trallic still exerts, the fair conclusion is, that during tlu; i)ast year there has 
been no such change in the character of the people as to Justify the conclusion thai 
the tratlic is gaining in influence. Rather we believe that the preponderance of 
testimony is on the other side. But if so, the margin of gain is not great, cannot be 



281 

in oiH' brit'f year. And any (limiiiwition of tlii' in(!iU'no«' of tlie (ralllc can only Im* 
olttiiincd l>y porHiHtent and vigilant I'tlorts on tli(> part of the Christian pcoiil*' of 
till' country. 

IV. It is auked, — Is the law as at i)rcsi'nt .-xistinn wol I enforced, or is it 
violated? And if not enforced, what is the reason? 

Tiie almost unhroken testimony is that the existing laws are not fully enforced. 
It must he borne in mind that no comntunity lives up to the letter of the law in 
iinv dcpartnu'Ut of life. In respect to the lenjperance laws it is fdt, that the 
aniiiuiit of violation tolerated is greater than it should he. A number of reusons 
JUT ^iivcii for this state of things. Tlu? failure in duty of the ollicials appointed to 
sec to its enforcenu>nt may, in particular localities, partly explain tlie fact, as is 
stilted in some rejtorts. The l>road fact remains that tlu- continual violation of the 
rc^iiilatious under llu' law, have, as might be expected, conu' to lie ac(|uiesccd in 
very gciHMally without ]»rotcst. The real rea.son of this state of things being that 
the <'onscience of the |)cople has not been educated up to the point which the law 
liiis reached. The (;onseience of the peo[>le rcciuircs to be continually rcinf(»rccd on 
this subji'ct. 

In a review of the whole situation, there has not taken place any sucii cliauge 
ill regard to this subject as to warrant any desi)oiiding feeling in rcgar<l to it. On 
tlic contrary, we have as much cau.se for thankfuliu'ss to (iod this year as we iiad 
last year, for the character and condition of our people in r«'s|)ect to tempcran<'c. 
Our reiigi(His temperature will always be tin? index of our moral standing. In lift- 
ing up the life and conscience (»f the people, their position on this subject will rise 
ill correspondence therewith. This is the hopeful element in the liig'i character of 
(Hir people on this subject, that it rests on conscience, and on, Cliristiaii principle, 
and not merely on hunum laws. Your committee submits that there are still pos- 
siitie udju.stments of the law, whicii would r«'mov»> conditions that arc complained 
III', and would l)ring nearer that deliverance of the pcoi)le from the evils of iutem- 
pcnmce. and that further suppression of the liallic. with its baleful accomitaui- 
niciils, which is the aim and desire of the Christian jx'oplc of the country. The 
sentiment of our Church on this (juestion is unchanged and inimistiikeatile. 
Ciiiistian nu'U may and do ditl'er as to ways and measures to be used in this spber«' 
1)1' Ciiristian activity, but the Church now, as in the past, will not rest satisfied, 
until the fullest enuviu-ijiation of llie i)eople from the ])ower of this trallic, and the 
ttiuplations which accompany it, that is possible of attainment, has been reached. 

The following remarks in ref«'rence to temperance, have been forwarded by 
Kcv. D. S. Fra.ser for insertion in the report : 



IHK IT.AX OK WORK, 

The workof educating our young i)eople in the [)riuciples of temperance should 
not be allowed to relax. While we may strive to secure and enforce llurbest possible 
laws to suppress the sale of liijuors, the work of education must be continued with 
zeal. The saloon is ever busy making recruits fortlie ranks of drinkers aiul drunk- 
arils, and it is of thegreatest importance that oiir children and youth should be well 
instructed in the i)rinciples of temi)erance as based on the teachings of Scrii)ture. 

The " Plan of Work " has, for some years, proved to be a very helpful nu-ans 
of carrying on this training in veiy many Sabbath Schools and C. K. Societies, 
samples, or parcels of manual, pledge cards, and pledge books, will be furnished on 
ajiplication to llev. D. Stiles Fraser, Upper Stewiacke, N.S. The ''Manual" 
explains all about the "Plan of Work" an<l how to introduce it into any Sabbath 
School, or C. E. Society. It also gives prices of necessary supplies. 

The young are fast growing older, now is the time to do work that will bear 
good fruit. 

2;:The seventh que.stion under this division has been misplaced. It should have 
lieen placed after (juestions 6 and (5, therefore we will con.sider (piestion ."> in its 
jiroper order. 



2M2 



J iV 



I* . 



■ 1! 



V. Wlinl is the stii(f (»r.tiM'ict\ in your IkxiikIh in regard to flmxlity ? 

It will lie ()l)H«'rv«>«l tliiit thin <|U(>stioii irlri-Htu tlir " stutt* of society '' in re^artl 
to this siil>j<-ct, iiihI not to tlic slatf of the Cliiirch in irl.ilion to it. iIioiikIi it Kivr- 
an opportunity tor any ol)st'rvations Si'ssionH nuiy think proper to niiikr upon ii. 
Some pastors have frit that tln'r«' is a necessity lor callinjt the allention of ihc 
Church to it. I'ossihly there does «'xist such necessity. Tint whether there lie m 
not, (he testimony ol'our Sessions is. that there is not special need tor dealing wiih 
this sultjcct so fur as the life of our Ciiurch is concerned. < hitside of the < 'liiin h 
the reports also intlicate, that in relation to this suliject, the character of our pop- 
idation stands hi^h. In some of the newer districts of the, west, as well as in niir 
cities, the subject naturally is more prominently l>rou;;ht un<ler the attentinn »\' 
the Church. It is lutt. however, neces.sary to dwell ujion it here, it is a sulijeit 
with which the Church will no dcaiitt dt'ul wisely and fearlessly wherever it is oli- 
truded on her notice. 

The deadly and fai- reaching power of the sins prohihited in the seventh cum- 
nnindment, denninds that all the churches should exercise vigilance in protecting' 
society a)j;ainst them. 




Ill 



-•.<■■■ 



VI. Is the sin of jxivinji; and receivinj; hrihes or (^tmmissions in eonnectioii 
with politics or husiness pr«'valenl in your comnuuiity ".■' What is lieini.' 
done to expose and condentu it ? 

This questi<m introdiu'es a sul>j«'ct to which. «'vitlently. the attention of oui 
Sessiiuis has not been nuich jjiven. At the sain«' tinu' the (jueslidu is an importiiiit 
one. We have been hearinj; much lately of the necessity of cultivatinuClirisliiiii 
citi/.enship. This is, t: ('relation involved in the tpu'stion. . Our Church is a p mm! 
school for citi/eiiship. The reports show that the violationsof it. referred to in liiis 
question, are n(tt found amon^ us. Nor was the (piestion asked with any expecta- 
tion that they woidd be. The sid)ject was introduced todireet attention to the fact 
that our relif^ious life is, and should be seen as c(msiiicuously and liri<;htly in (Hir 
citizenship as in any other relation. There is no locality within the scope of oui' 
returns, in which this evil has been so prominent as to have arrested the attentinn 
of the Church. There is in almost cvi'ry locality a small lunnberof the populatioii 
who may be enticed into these jiraittices. The inlluence (»f Christian peoi>le should 
render them a diminishiiifx (|uantity in every part of our land. The greater jiii ill 
lies on those, who knowing; the sin of it, and the baseness of the sin, take advaiil- 
aji;e of the jtoverty and i<!;norance of the persons they attempt to seduce. It is well 
that this i<j;noble and dangerous sin against the state, and against the divine law , 
has bi-en made a crime i)unishable by more severe jienalties. This t|uestion, and 
the one which precedes it, prei)are the way for the next, which is 

VII. Is the influence of the Church being more deeply felt, or less deejily. 
by those who are outside of it ? 

Tliis <|uestion is worthy of greater consideration than it seems from many of 
the reports to have received. The answers given to it are not very definite or in a 
very eonlident tone. They are so varied, and in many eases so imjterfect. that it 
is not possible to gather from them the mind of the Church on the subject. \or is 
it possible to pronounce with any certainty ui)on one side or the other. That the 
Church does exert a powerful inlluence on the personal and social life of the jieopif 
is beyond debate. This is everywhere recogni/ed. liut theciuestion astowliether 
this inlluence is increasing or dinnnishing is more dillicult. We know that the 
Churi^h may be outwardly prosjterous, and yet not exert, nor be capable of exerting 
any moral or si)iritual inlluence. We know further, that the Church may be dis- 
charging all her offices, and her courts be filled with worshippers, and yet that the 
influence which she exerts on the life of the people may be injurious rather than 
beneficial. 

Hence the importance of this (juestion. If tlie Church lias not higher stantUinls 
of conduct than the world demands, if she does iu>t produce lives with a higher aim 



•i.-ia 



Ml Vi-nnnl 
Kh i( yiv,., 
:<• iipiiii it, 
i<»ii I. III,,. 

l»Tl' lit' ,,| 

"liiiK Willi 

K' <'lllll(|| 

• •III- |.(,|,. 
IIS in ,,||,. 
'iilj I 

il S||l|j,.,.| 

it is'i.j,. 

"Ill Clllll- 

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I is JH'ill;. 



>ll Oflllll' 

'iporliiiii 
'lii-is(j,.|,| 

S il 0(mh| 

•> ill I his 

•'Xp('cl;i- 

tllf CilCl 

.V ill our 
••' <>r(Mir 
ttrntidii 
iiilaliiiii 
' sIkiiiIiI 
cr ;4iiiii 
iKlvinil- 
is Well 
lie liiw. 

'II, and 

lecjiiy. 



iuiy (if 
»r ill a 
tliar il 
N'or is 
It tlic 

ICOJlIc 

letlicr 
t tin- 

Ttilio 

.' (lis- 
t the 
than 

aids 
aim 



iiinl II purer Hpifit than thoHc which urow up <iutsiiU' of hi-r courts, then she can 
li;i\f ii«» power to purify or eh-vatc the pulilic conscience. 

I'he character of the coniniiiiiily in which her \vorl\ is carried on, iiut which 
in not fouiwl att«>n(liii){ on reli)(iourt services, is une important measure of her 
iiilhience. Thoii^rli Hi,, n-ports as state<l do not speak ih-liniti-iy, tliey iiiay he 
I'i'Uiitded as inciiniiiK to t lie more hopcfiii v iew of tliei|ue>lion. Hut the uncertainty 
(if ilieir deliverances shows that the more hopeful view was not so conspicuous as 
til lie at once ohsei'Mihle. 

This is the last of the series of questions siihmitted. 'riiou;;h they may not be 
us |icrtinent as they should he, they at least all'oni to Sessions a fair opportunity of 
|ircsentin|{ important aspects of the life and work of the Church. 



KKl'OltT Ol' Hl'H-COMMITTKK of THK UKNKlt.M, A.s.SK.Mlll.Y H (OM.MITTKK ON 

I. IKK AND WORK. 

IMie (■eiieral Assenilily of last yearadded to the recommendations of the Report 
(III Life and \V(U'k the followinj^ recommendation: (See min.: (J. A. ji. •'>"».) 

•• In view of th" fiu't that we arc soon t<» enter upon a new century, and that 
till' (o-neral Assenihly has taken delinite action towards the raising of a Century 
Fund, in order suitahly to mark the occasion in connection with the work of our 
Ciiiirch. the .\sseinhly definitely recoj^nizes the supreme importance of an advance 
ill spiritual life, and to that end invites to special prayer and co-operation the entire 
nicmhership. and especially the ministers and otlice hearers of our Church, through- 
out the cominj> year, that a committee he appointed whose duty it will he to take 
such action as they may deem desirahle to stimulate, direct, and secure unanimity 
in such ctl'ort." 

In accordance with this resolution a suh-committee was appointed to carry out 
lliis recommendation. 

This sul»-<"ommittee met in Toronto in the month of Septemher. As the result 
of their deliherations, they issued tlu' follow in^ circular to the clerks of I'reshyteries 
and to the pastors of the Church : — 

BARUIE, Sept. ir,tfi, 1S9i). 
To llir Clrrk of the Preshi/tenj : 

Dkak Sir : — On Itehalf of the Committee of the General Assenildy on Church 
Life and Work, I would respectfully ask you to call the attention of the I'reshytery 
at its first meet inf>- to the followinj>' facts: — (I) That in every report on Life and 
Work received liy tlu' Committee from I'reshyteries. complaint was made of the 
worldly spirit inevailiiif; in the ( 'hurch as the chief hindrance to the proj^ress of the 
iiospel. {'2) That the (Jeiieral Asscmhiy recommends that " I'reshyteries and Ses- 
sions make use of such nu'asurcs as they deem wise to revive the relij,noiis life of 
con<j;regations." Also that " they takt^ such measures as they deem eU'ective for 
the removal of the chief hindrances of the work of the gospel of which complaint 
is made hy them.'' In view of tliese fiicts, the Committee on Church Life and 
Work respectfully ask that the Presbytery take such action as it considers proper 
in the circumstances. Tn the hope that hy the united action of all llu' Presbyteries 
(if the Church the spiritual life of the Church may lie strengthened, and tin- hind- 
rance!? comidained of, at least in some measure be taken out of the way. 

I liave been instructed by the sub-committee on Church Life anil Work to send 
to you for distribution to members of Presbytery, a circular which I have forwarded 
to you. 

I am, yours very respectfully, 

D. D. McLEOD, 

Convener. 




r !■■■ L 



234 



I ':'!'■ / 






{The Circular to Pastors.) 

Baerie, September loth, 1899. 

Dear Sir : — The sub-committee of the Committee on Church Life and Work 
appointed by the General Assembly, " to carry out the last recommenthitiou of the 
report of tiuit Committee " — and " whose duty it will betotakesuch action as tin y 
may deem desirable to stimulate, direct, and secure unanimity in such effort '" 
as may be made throughout the year by the ministers and office-bearers ofoiir 
Church to promote the spiritual life of the Church, (see minutes General Assembly, 
p. 55) respectfully submit and suggest. 

1. That in eacli Presbytery the carrying out of the recommendation adopted 
by the General Assembly above referred to, be remitted to the Committee oii 
Church Life and Work in the Presbytery, or to the conmiittee which may be ap- 
pointed in connection with the Century Fund. 

2. Your Committee is aware that pastors and office-bearers are in sympathy 
with the Assembly's recommendation, and consider that it might be carried out 
with good ell'ect throughout the Church in the following manner : — 

(it) liy the preaching of one or more discourses " recognizing the supreme im- 
portance of an advance in spiritual life," making such use of the historical situation 
of the Church as may minister to that end. 

The record of what God has enabled the Church to accomplish is not so well- 
known to our ])eople as it should be. Only a church earnestly alive can enter 
hopefully on the opportunities which tlu; opening of the new century presents. 

(ft) By devoting a number of the evenings of prayer meetings — to addresses and 
prayers — with the object of awakening the spiritual life of the Church, and request- 
ing that prayer be made for the .same object in the homes of the people. 

{(') That during this time a systematic effort be made to reach by visit or 
otherwise non-church going families in the district. 

{d) \^\ these, the ordinary means of grace, directed specially to the end in 
view, with such additional means as may be available, your Committee hopes thi.i 
the object of the General A.ssembly may at least in some measure be attained. 



Yours res])ectfully. 



D. I). McLFOD, 

' Convener. 



u 






To what extent this api)eal of the General Assembly was resjionded to we arc 
notable to report. Not in any of the reports so far received is there any reference to 
attempts made in the Presbytei-ies to carry out these recommendations of the coni- 
mitti-e. But it would not be fair to the Presbyteries to conclude from that circum- 
stance that no response has been made by them to the appeal of the General 
Assembly, Xor would it be fair to conclude that the work of the sub-committee 
had been without any beneficial result. 

The period in which the Committee had to do its work was very short. It took 
some time to get the work assigned to it, formulated and distributed. In a large 
number oi congregations efforts were made to carry out the purpose of the Assembly. 
And in all the congregations attention was no doubt given to the appeal in such 
form as was possible. Tiie Assembly can Judge whether as much has been accom- 
plished in the direction aimed at as was hoped for, or as was possible in the time 
at our di.sjiosal. A revival of the life of the Church cannot be secured even at the 
order of a (ieneral Assembly, nor is it expected to be. It recjuires time to do 
spiritual work and to reap results from it. The instruction of the Assembly has 
been carried out as wisely and promptly as the Committee could do it, and probably 
as much good has resulted from the effort made as could be reasonably expected. 
This special appeal which pa.stors were asked to make, together witli the earnest 



235 



aiiiKiils luude on heimlf of tlie Century Fund and In connection witli it, have no 
(Idiibt liad a ((uickening etleet on the conscience of the Cluirch. 

CONCLUDING REMARKS. 

Tt is to be borne in mind in considering this report, that the i)rinei)>al benefit 
derived by the Churcii from the work of tlie Committer is to be found in tliese two 
directions. P^'irst, in the fact that by the questions submitted, ail tlie Sessions of 
the Church have their attention directed to the religious life of the people under 
tlicir care, and to the i)rogress wliich the Church is making in her spiritual opera- 
tions. And second, in the consideration by Presbyteries, of the admirable reports 
sul)initted to them on the imjjortant subjects embraced in the (piestions. These 
rci^orts, as already stated, are prepared with great care, and sympathy with the 
vaiious matters discussed. In manj' of them, useful recommendations are, made, 
wiiich space forbids our quotinji here ; the same reason prevents our making <|uot- 
atidiis from the reports themselves, though in nearly all of them valuable remarks 
arc made on the subjects under consideration. Also it is to be rememl)ered that 
very diiferent conditions obtain in the widely separated districts from which the 
reports come. In some parts of the Church, as is to be expecited. there is a more 
eiK'diiraging state of congregational life than in others. 

It io not to be expected that in the short period which has (dapsed since the 
reports of the preceding year were issued, that any very marked change can have 
taken place in the conditions of congregational life. The great desideratum in 
connection with these reports is, that the Sessions and Presbyteiies should take up 
tiiis subject of the life and work of the Church more seriously, and give more time 
to it, realizing that on the life of the Church the success of every detail in the 
ailniinistration of her manifold interests depends. Your Committee submits also, 
tiiat it is worthy of consideration whether some (d)auge might be introduced in the 
lorni in which these returns are required. As the Assembly is aware, tliis Com- 
mittee has remitted to it the subjects formerly reported on by four separate com- 
mittees. These dealt with the subjects of. The State of Religion ; The Sabbath; 
Temperance and Systematic Benetlcience. This Committee therefore gives a jilace 
to each of these subjects so far as pos.sible in the (jueries .submitted to the Sessions. 
Tiiis fact in a measure confines the scojie of the (juestions. It might be the means 
of giving greater variety and lil)erty of treatment to tiie subjects under Life and 
Work, ifthe Presbyterial Committees were recpiested to take up the work ea<di in 
its own way. The Assembly's Committee merely sending down a reipiest for 
returns dealing with the life and work of the congregations under the care oi"t)ic 
l'resl)yteries. Such a course would entail mu(di more work on the Convener of tliis 
Committee, but it might result in new and interesting aspects of t lie Church's work. 

The reports of this year, as of former years, indicate nundi earnest life and 
labor in all the congregations reporting, notwithstanding that in some ol' these the 
interest in vital (luestions is not so great as in others. 

If it is asked, as it should be by a Committee on Life and Work, if the ( liurch is 
maintaining her position throughout the country and making that jirogrcss which 
siiould be ex])ected. the answer must depend on how much is incimled in the 
([uestion, and how much is expected of the Cliundi. 

One fact in the record of the i)ast year makes it manifest, that whatever sliort- 
ooming may exist in localities, in contrilniting to the support of tlie (ios|)(d, the 
Church as a whoU' lia.s done Ix'ttcr in this direction than ever before. Dr. NVarden 
lias stated in the publicaticms which circulate in our congregations as follows: — 
"There has never perhaps in the history of the country been a year in whicdi 
so many special appeals have been made to our people. It was naturally exjiected 
that these would interfere to a greater or less extent with the contributions for ♦he 
regular schemes of the 'Church. It is therefore encouragiiig to know, that the 
contributions for the Schemes were larger during the year whicih r<'cently closed 
than in any preceding year in the history of the ( iiundi." This is indeed 
encouraging testimony. For we may justly conclude, ^^hat enlarging contributions 







236 










are an index of growing interest in the work of the Church. This fact should 
encourage the committees on Churcli Life and Work to continue to educate tlie 
people on the Schemes, as they have heen doing in the past. If they do s(>. the 
record of each succeeding year may be as gratifying in this respect, and as 
honorable to the Church as the r- cord of this year has been. 

This year has been as other years, in the persistent faithful pressing on iu the 
appointed duties, and in the common ways of effort, on the part of all our 
congregations. This is what is required of us from day to day, and it is this which 
has carried our Church onward through many difficulties to her present position 
of usefulness and power. The silent forces are the mightiest. The faith, the 
zeal, the i)rayor. the sympathy, the humble following of the Master in tiie 
details of life, these it is which break up the indifference and the unbelief of the 
world, and make way for the (lospel. Throughout our wide Dominion these have 
been making their influence felt. The contribution of our Church to the Life of 
our Conntry is of the highest value. The work of the Church is the formation of 
intelligent christian character. It is a work not only of converting, but of building 
up in knowledge and faith. Our circumstances as a people call for the putting 
forth of our best efforts in this direction, not content with a decorous perforniancs 
of religious ceremonies, nor with an occasional out-break of emotional zeal, Itut 
educating the con.science, and building character on an intelligent faith in tlic 
Divine word, and Divine authority. It is manifest that the Church is takinj; 
possession of her mission opportunities with wisdom and in a generous spiiit, 
though alwa\ s, our opportunities go far beyond either our ability or inclination to 
use them. In the mirrower but no less important spheres of the family, and 
congregation the life and work of the Church has been manifested as we have seen 
in many encouraging directions. The whole .survey emphasizes the teaching of 
past years, that in order to maintain and carry forward the, good work, the highest 
stanclard of culture and efficiency in the ministry must be maintained. Unintelli- 
gent pulpit or pastoral work, is very much, labor lost. The consecration of a 
cultivated pastorate to the work of the Master is the hope of the Church. A revival 
and continuance of pastoral fidelity, and of fidelity in all our office bearers is the 
condition essential to anv advanc^e. 



THE CKNTURY FUND, 

This part of the year's work need not be spoken of here, as it will be fully 
dealt witn by itself. It is only referred to, as having entered largely into the 
life and work of the Church during the past year. The effect of it on our 
congregations has been wholly beneficent. It has been highly and beneficially 
educative Just where education is most required. Your Ccmnnittee trusts that the 
expectation of the Church will be realized, the million dollars obtained, and with 
this, that the Divine bk-.sinp; wny be bestowed on all our congregations and families, 
so that a great spiritual refreshing may be enjoyed in all our borders. 



Our e 
The mann 
themselvei 
from sea t' 
pleasure, 
spirit and 
perils and 
selves, on I 
It is tl 
i-estored t(| 
opeuinj. 
Jesus Chri 
Yoiu- 
our short 
Ihivnkfulu 
ToH 



It is 
ivppear tl 
Pvosbytei 



1. T 

congrega 
members 
where it 

2. 'i 
Work of 
to them 

H. ' 
tlie tern 
total ab 
sale of i 

4. 
eneroac 
Lord's 

Al 



THE FAMINE FUND. 



This is only alluded to here because it has been the occasion of one of the most 
gratifying exhibitions of christian benevolence which our Church has ever made. 
When in addition to the largest contributions to the schemes ever given, the 
contribution to the 'Century Fund, and to the Patriotic Funds, our peoi)le 
contributed $50,000 to save the dying people of India from starvation, we cnnotbut 
recognize with gratitude to God the presence of a generous and Chiistian spirit 
in them, wiiich deserves high commendation. 



ports 
Otlav 
mom 

r 

from 



jucate tile 
|(lo s,., ti,e 

and as 

JV" ill tlie 
|i 'ill oiir 
liis wliK-li 

position 
fiiitli, (|h> 
■r ill the 
ef of tile 

ese liave 
e Life of 
nation of 

l>iiil(liiig 
' putting 
''"i'inanc« 
2«al, l»ut 
h in tile 
s tal<iiin- 
IS .spirit, 
atiou to 
ily, and 
ive seen 
ching of 

'■ liigiiest 
^uintcili- 
ou of a 
^ revival 
i-a is the 



)e fully 

itO till" 

on our 
ficiallv 
lat tlie 
fl witli 
milics. 



287 



THK NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. 



(Kir country during the past year has entered on a new page in lier history. 
The manner in which our young men in every part of the Dominion ollered 
tlieinselves in tlie service of tlieir country, the splendid loyalty of all our people 
tVoiii sea to sea, is an event in our national life wliich the Church recognizes with 
pleasure. Not only so, but the valiant conduct of our soldiers, and the admirable 
spirit and conduct they have shown, both on the field of battle, and in all the 
perils and suffering of the campaign, have reflected the highest honor on them- 
selves, on their homes, and on their country. 

It is the hope and prayer of every Christian heart, that peace may soon be 
restored to the people of South Africa, and that the issue of the war, may be the 
opening of wider doors for the extension of the Kingdom of our Lord and Saviour 
Jesus Christ. 

Your Committee submits, that on a survey of the year's work, even with all 
our sliort-comings in view, the General Assembly never had greater reason for 
thankfulness to God than it has at this time. 

To His name be all the praise. 



RECO^NIMENDATIONS. 

It is customary to conclude these reportrj with recommendations. It does not 
ajipear that tliese are taken very seriously or are acted upon by Sessions or 
Presbyteries. 

YOUR COMMITTEE RECOMMENDS. 

1. Tliat an earnest effort be made by pastors and office bearers in all our 
(•(iiigregalions, to secure contributions to all the Schemes of the Church from all the 
imnibers and adlierents, and ihat the methods for collecting for the Schemes, 
wiiere it is necessary, be so adjusted as to secure this desirable end. 

'2. That pastors bring before the congregations the subject of the Life and 
Work of the Church as brought out in the reports, in such a manner as may seem 
to tiiem best fitted to engage the interest of the people. 

8. That • pastors continue to use such measures as they deem wise to strengtlien 
tiie tempe-ance sentiment of the people, to inculcate the privilege and duty of 
total abstinence, and to ripen public opinion for a furtlier advance in restricting tlie 
fiale of intoxicants. 

4. That continued diligence be used in every congregation to <'oinbat 
enoroacliements on the Sabbath : and that wherever possible, branches of the 
Lord's Day Alliance be established. 



All of which is respectfully submitted. 




■ ■ \ ■ v-i. 



D. D. McLEOD, 

Convener, 



most 
nade. 
I. the 
i'opJe 
•tbut 
qurit 



SUPPLEMENT. 

Since prei)ariug the above statement on the Life and Work of the Churcli, re- 
ports have been received from the following Synods. The Synod of Montreal aiyl 
Ottawa, of Toronto and Kingston, of Hamilton and London, and at the last 
moment of British Columbia. 

These reports, as might be expected, are admirable compendiums of the returns 
from the Presbyteries within their bounds. They contain views of the Life and 



238 











Work of th(' Churcli, us exhibited in lier operations during the past year, very imicli 
in agreement with tliose presented in tlie report ol" jour eonunittee. 

The Synod of Montreal and Ottawa adopts eleven reeomniendations dculiiig 
with points in the rejjort. It states that "on the whole the reports from I'nsliy 
teries are favorable. They summon us to make, if possible, more strenuous illoiis 
than ever before, to work for the Master." 

The Synod of Toronto and Kingston adopts eight recommendations in con- 
nection with its report. These, like those of the Synod of Montreal and Ottawa, 
deals with j)iiases of the work referred to in tiie report. Tiiey deplore the evils 
therein alluded to, and express thankfulness for ble.ssing enjoyed, and work accdin- 
plished during the year. One suggestion of the report is, that larger promiiituco 
l)e given to the doetriiui of sanctitieation in the teaching of the Chureh, and diu' 
recommendation is, that I'resbyterial committees might be appointed with advant- 
age, to consult with and assist any congregation within the bounds, that might ask 
their aid for the better working of their linaneial afl'airs. 

The Synod of Hamilton and London speaks in very hopeful terms of the ((in- 
dition of the Church witiiin its bounds. Its recommendations take eogni/.aiu't- of 
the encouraging condition of the Church, and express thankfulness to God for it, 
Tiiey also commend the appointment of the Rev. J. G. Shearer as Field Secretary 
of the Ontario Lord's Day Alliance,. and the action of the General As.senibly in its 
ellbrts to raise a million dollar twentieth century thank.sgiving fund. 

The re})()rt of the Synod of British Columbia is a particularly interesting docM- 
ment. Ft sets forth the peculiar diflicultics encountered by the Church in that jiart 
of the field. The conclusion of the report is, that notwithstanding these ditliciii- 
ties, the inlluence of the Chuich is every year being more deeply felt. The report 
closes in the following terms : " We have sought at your direction to lay our hands 
on the pul.-se of the Ciiurch, iis it beats in these reports, and we declare the iuavt 
strong and tlic healtii increasingly good. There are still many .sores on the body 
which call for skillful treatment. The upbuilding process seems often painfully 
slow, but when we look back a few years, and set the i)resent beside the past, we 
have everywhere much reason to thank God and take courage. Our deepest grati- 
tude we owe to God who has not withheld Jiis Holy Spirit from us, notwithstaml- 
ing our many sins, and has given us to be laborers with Him in the furtherance of 
tlu! Kingdom of Heaven." The recommendations " urge that increasing etibrts lie 
made to promote the great ends the Church has in view, and to permeate busincs.s 
and ,so('ial life witii the .spirit of the Gos])el of Christ." I append to the report tiic 
following report from the Itev. J. Pringle of Atlin, from which the (general 
Assembly will learn the conditions under which our missionary in that held ha.< to 
carry on his work, and the .spirit in which he is doing it. 



CHURCH LIFE AND ^'-^ORK. 

Atlin, B.C., March S 1st, 1900. 

We have a cnngretjafinn here in rhe simple, jn-imary sense of the word. There 
is no organization except a managing committee whieli has been recon-structed live 
times within the year, each time out of almost new material. The professing 
Christians here and at Pine City believe in mi.ssions, especially home missions, in 
every kind of aggressive Ciiristian work ; but the camp is so poor, and the calls 
upon us for cases of local need so numerous, that nothing could be done for outside 
interests. I have been long in the West, and I have never known a community 
give so mu(!li, in projxjrtion to its means, for the relief of real human need as has 
Atlin. 

The people are interested in religion. One is startled sometimes to find, that 
peo' 'f he thought indilferent, and some he thought antagonistic, are more deejtly 
i' .rested in religion than he is. The irreligiousuess of professing Christians, their 
loose or inditt'erent lives, are our greatest hindrance and weakness. If members of 



289 



Churches would display their btuiners a little more openly, the evil we deplore 
would not be so great, or its iuttiieuoe so pernicious. 

TlV-' Sabbath is a quiet day here. But in the busy season a great deal of work 
is (lone on that day, " The season is so short," is the excuse. That is eminently 
satisfactory as you can see, disposes of every objection, for it puts the blame on 
God. If he had only put Atlin in the "Banana Belt" we could keep the Sabbath 
(lay lioly. 

The evils of drink are more apparent here than in any field I have ever served 
ill. The license law seems to i)ernnt of an unlimited number of bars in a com- 
muuity. Our boys are away from home restraints, living where there are. lew 
oiipDitunitics for the enjoyment of clean or even rational i)leasures, and they drift 
into lh(* bar and many of them to the devil, or to use what is thought a more ele- 
1,'ant and less profane expression, "to the dogs." You .'<ee there are no homes 
licie as yet, there is no resort but tent, cabin or saloon. Every nussionary sent to 
•tiierim" ought to have money enough placed at his disposal, to build at once 
oil iiis arrival, on the best lot for his purpose whulevcr ita cost, a good, brijrht, whole- 
soiiu- home for the Church to which the boys could come to read, rest or write. 
Wo are handicapi)ed because of our penury. 

'file saloun is always ahead on the choice lots, i.e., where the people <tre. 1 have 
no love for the West End location. The missionary with an anxious look on his 
lace, and enough money in his pocket to buy pork and beans for two or three 
months, sidles up to ihe saloon keeper and asks him ior his place for service. He 
frets it, but every such favour askecl is an additional strand to the string which the 
devil has on the missionary when he has to liglit evil. 

Then the inevitable subscription list, the anxiety about lots, and the snare 
(Iriim ill the East beating the advance for saiarj/ in the missionary's ears. We house 
ill a tent, on lots where they may be had for nothing if possible. Sawdust floor, 
roufili board seats without backs, a stick with a board on its end for a pulpit, and 
we go into the fight against the devil who goes about, and the devil in human 
lieaits, with his lielpers, the bar and dance hall, they have good solid smooth fK)or, 
{■oinlbrtable chairs on which a man can tilt himself back and with feet on window 
ieili;e, feel a touch of home, counters with hardwood tops — everything, whi(;h can 
lie procured and moved so far, to draw and hold men. Oh I know all about the 
(lilliciilty of getting money and the truth that God uses "the things that are not 
to bring to naught the things that are." But the firm starting business through its 
aiieiit in Atlin, ought to see that he and his outfit worthily represent the firm and 
its interests. I believe that such a course will reiuilt in large dividends. Ask the 
British American Corporation, Parson's Produce Co., Wilson Brothers, the Banks 
alumt it, and note what they say. And their fight for business is nothing to the 
strenuous, unintermittent and infinitely imjiortant fight for the souls of men. 

The unblushing impurity of the lives of r?o many men and women in this land 
makes me sick, nauseates me. 

And yet. the gospel is appreciated. There is a great number true to the 
Saviour. A large proportion of our population attend Church. Seven-eighths of 
the people here respect him who stands right up to the devil, whose blood is up in 
the cause of righteousness^ and whose life is a reflection of Christ's. Strange though 
it may appear, I have learnt to be almost extravagantly hopeful since coming here. 
Kvil cannot win. Good must. However poor and weak and half-hearted its 
ai{eiits — it must win, it alone has in it the pi>omise of death to its foes, and of life to 
the world. 

JOHN PR INGLE. 




240 



!in • 



REPOIJT OF COMMITTEE ON SABBATH OBSER- 
VANCE AND LEGISLATION. 



To the Venerable the General Assembly : 

Your Coinmittee on Sabbath Observance and Legislation appointed a year 
ago, " In view of the unusual iiinmds being made on the sanctity aud integrity df 
the Lord's Day in Canada, aiul in view of the desirability of having the convic- 
tions of the Tresbyterian Church adequately and ellectively represented before the 
Government of tiie Dominion and Provinces in co-oi»eration with simihir com- 
mittees of otlu'r Churcljcs and organizations, wwrking for the preservation of tlic 
Lord's Day," desire to present tlie following report : 

(1). No circumstances have arisen calling for any such action on the part (tf 
your Committee as thuir appointment contemplated, and thus, so far as any definite 
work done by them is concerned they hnve no report to offer. 

(2). Owing, however, to the supreme importance of the right observance of 
the Lord's Day, and the danger that the day of rest should be made a day partly 
of toil and gain or i)artly of pleasure-seeking, and the critical uncertainty of our 
laws upon the question, your Committee deem it wise to present : 

I. — Some hopeful and encouraging signs. 

II. — For the information of members of the Court, a memorandum of the 
Statutes in the Provinces of Canada, for which, as for some other details, we are 
much indebted to Mr. A. E. O'Meara, Solicitor of the Ontario Lord's Day Alliance. 

III. — A statement of the present condition of legislation on the subject. 



I. — Hopeful and Encouraging Signs. 



r '' * '■ 



(a). Your Committee corresponde'd with various labor organizations throuiili- 
•out our country, e.g., branches of Trades and Labor Councils and Trades and Lalioi 
Congress of Canada, and received si'.ch replies as these : Mr. C. Wlieat, Secretiiiy 
Trades and Lab«)r Council, of Toronto, says: " I do not know of any body of 
organized men who do not oppose Sabbath labor at any aud all times." Mr. II. 
Terry, Secretary London Trades and Labor Council, says^ " This Council does not 
favor anything in the way of Sabbath labor. Almost all the organizations atl'il- 
iated with us have })laced in their constitutions demands for double time for work 
on the Sabbath as a protest against it." Mr. Geo. W. Dower, Secretary Trades 
and Labor Congress, says : " Our Congress is on record as opposing the Sabbath 
labor, aud as emphatically opposing the seven days a week." Mr. D. J. O'Dono- 
ghue, who has a long and honorable connection with the Trades and Labor organ- 
izations, and is an uncompromising upholder and advocate of the right observance 
of the Lord's Day, not only from the workingman's standpoint but from a religious 
point of view, gives a copy of the resolutions passed in 1899 at the annual meetini; 
of the Trades and Labor Congress of Canada, in Montreal, as follows ; •' That this 
Congress protests against the inhuman practice of compelling men to work seven 
days in succession, aud affirms that one day of rest in seven is a natural law aud 
an absolute necessity of common life and cannot be broken with safety. Therefore 



241 



>BSKR. 



ed a year 
tejj:rity cf 
e coiivj,.. 
I)eibre tla- 
liliir fuin- 
iou of (he 



>« l»ait of 
»y tleliiiite 



rvaiu'(> of 
ay l)ai'tly 
ity of ouV 



be it resolved that it be au instruction to all organizations affiliated with this body 
to co-operate with all and any association or society to secure legislative enact- 
ment providing for one day's rest in seven." 

Surely these facts supply a point of contact with the laboring men for which, 
as a Cliurch, we should be devoutly thankful, and, as Ministers, we should seize 
and hold, that we may enlist on our side in defeBce of the Sabbath this mighty 
army. 

(2). Tile success of the Dominion Branch of the Lord's Day Alliance, and in 
particular uf tlie Ontario Lord's Day Alliance, in creating, arousing and crystal- 
lizinjr public seiiliinent in the matter of the right observance of the Lord's Day. 

Tile Ontario Branch was formed in 1895 and in the end of ""SQa had twenty- 
four Brunches. The etlicient work of the Rev. J. G. Shearer, as General Organizer 
during the early part of 1899 until his appointment as Field Secretary in the 
autumn of 1899, brought the number of Branches up at the close of the year to 
nearly eighty, and tlie number is steadily increasing. Besides, the Alliance has 
already secured important legislation, e.*/., the Act in 1897 making it impossible 
for any street or electric railroad to secure a charter after that date to have 
Sunday privileges. It has frustrated also the applications of several parties asking 
l)ermission for unneces.sary labor and business. 

(3). Your own action in appointing this Special Committee to voice your 
feelings officially when occasion demands is another hopeful sign by which we 
should be encouraged, as indicating tlmt the Church as i' whole is seized with the 
importance of the situation. The figlit that is to mean everything for the well- 
being of our ("liureh and pure religion in our land is now on. Let no Pre.sbyterian 
minister or congregation be found indifferent when the foe is attacking on every 
hand, but encouraged by these cheering signs redouble the efforts in its defence. 




m of the 
s, we are 
Alliance. 

ct. 



II —MEMORANDUM OF STATUTES IN PROVINCES OF CANADA. 



throujih- 
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Mr. ]J. 
Joes not 
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ONTARIO. 

The following English Statutes are in force (see Reg. v. Barnes, 45 U.C, Q.B.) 

1 Chan, i, cap. 1. -'An Act for punishing divers abuses, committed on the Lord's 
Day, commonlij called Sunday."' 

"Forasmuch as . . . the holy keeping of the Lord's Day ... is 
profaned by a disorderly sort of people in exercising and frequenting, bear-baiting, 
bull-baiting, interludes, common plays and other unlawful exercises and pastimes, 
and many quarrels and bloodslied, etc., have grown . . . there shall be no 
meetings, assemhlies or concourse of people out of their parish on the I^ord's Day 
. for any sports or pastimes whatsoever, nor any bear-baiting, bull-baiting, 
interludes, common plays, or other unlawful exercises and pastimes by any person 
or persons within their own parish." 

3 Chas. 1,'cap. 1. ".in Act for the further reformation of sundry cdmaes committed 
on the Lord^a Day, commonly called Su7iday." 

" Forasmuch as the Lord's Day, commonly called Sunday is much broken and 
profaned by carriers, carters, etc., be it enacted that no carrier with any horse or 
horses, nor waggon men with any waggon or waggons, nor cartnien with any cart 
or cai'ts, nor wainmen with any wain or wains, nor drovers with any cattle shall 
by themselves or any other travel upon the said day," 



S9 Chas. 2, cap. 7. 
monlv calbd Siindav." 



"^4h Act for the better observance of the Lord's Day, com- 




al-')'^. 



HIIW: 



m 



242 

'*For the better observation and keejAng holy the Lord's Day, commonly called 
Sunday, be it enacted, 

(2). "That all laws enacted and in force concerning the observation of th« 
Lord's Day be carefully put in execution. 

(3). " And that all and every person whatsoever shall on every Lord's Day apply 
themselves to the observation of the same, etc. 

(4). "And that no tradesman, artificer, workman, laborer, or oth«r person what- 
soever shall do or exerciHti any worldly labor, business or work of their ordinary 
callings upon the Lord's Day or any part thereof (works of necessity and charity 
only excepted). 

(6). ' ' And that no person or persons whatsoever shall publicly cry, show forth or 
expose for sale, any wares, merchandises, fruit, herbs, goods or chattels whatsoever 
upon the Lord's Day or any part tliereof. And it is further enacted tiiat no drover, 
horse-courser, waggoner, butcher, higgler, their, or any of their servants sliall travel 
or come iuto his or their iun or lodging upon the Lord's Day or any part tliereof. 

(2). " And that no person or persons shall use, employ or travel upon tiie 
Lord's Day witii any boat, wherry, lightci- or barge, except it be upon extra- 
ordinary occasion to be allowed by some Justice of tlie Peace, etc. , 

'•Provided, that notliing in this Act contained shall extend to the prohibiting of 
the dressing of meat in families, or dressing or selling meat in inns, cook-shops, or 
victualling liouses for such as otherwise cannot be provided, or to the crying or 
selling of milk before nine of the clock in the morning or after four 6f the clock in 
the afternoon. 

"Provided, that if any person or persons whatsoever wliich shall travel on the 
Lord's Day shall be then robbed, that no hundred of the inhabitants thereof shall 
be charged with or answerable for any robbery so committed." 

21 Geo. 3, cap. 49 (1781). 

Sec. 1. — " Any house, room, or any other public place which shall be opened 
or used for public entertainment or amusement, or for public debating, or any subject 
whatsoever upon ony part of the Lord's Day called Sunday, and to which persons 
shall be aihnifted by the payment of money, or by tickets sold for money, shall be 
deemed a disorderly house or place." 

The keeper is liable to a penalty of £00 pounds, the manager to one of 100 
pounds, etc., to be recovered by " such person as will sue for the oame." 

Sec. 2. Advertising public entertainment or amusement prohibited. 



"u4n Act to prevent the profanation of the 



Revised Statutes of Ontario, cap. S46, 
Lord's Day." 

Sec. 1. — "It is Hot lawful for any merchant, tradesman, farmer, artificer, 
mechanic, workman, laborer, or other person whatsoever, on the Lord's Day to 
sell or publicly shew forth or expose or offer for sale, or to purchase any goods, 
chattels, or other personal property, or any real estate whatsoever, or to do or 
exercise any worldly labor, business or work of his ordinary calling (conveying 
travellers or Her Majesty's mail by land or water, selling drugs and medicines, 
and any other works of necessity and works of charity only excepted.)" 

See. 2 \)roh\h\ts public political meetings, and also certain acts likely to disturb 
public quiet. 

Sec. 3. — "It is not lawful for any person on that day to play at skittles, ball, 
foot-ball, rackets, or any other noisy game, or to gamble with dice or otherwise, or 
to run races on foot or on horse-back, or in carriages, or in vehicles of any sort." 

Sec. 4 prohibits hunting and shooting. 

Sec 6 prohibits fishing. 



2V.i 



" The word "owner " in this section shall include a corporation. 

"This section shall not apply to ferries or to steamboats when employed 



b?!C. 6 prohibits bathing in any public place. 

(1). Sec. 7. — ^^ Sunday excursions by steamboats plying for hire, or by railway, 
or in part by any such steuraboat and in part by any railway, and havimj for t-heir 
only or principal object the carriage of Sunday paasengera for amtutement or pleasure 
only, and to go and return on the same day by the same steamboat or railway, or any 
utlier, owned by the same persons or company, shall bo unlawful, and shall not be 
deemed a lawful conveying; of travellers within the meaning? of the Act. 

(2). "The owner of any steamboat or railway by which any such Sunday 
excursion is wholly or partly made shall, for each offence against this section, 
forfeit any day the sum of f^OO, to be recover«d in any Court having jurisdiction 
in civil cases to that amount, by any person suing for the same under this section 
and for the purposes thereof 

(3). "The action lor the recovery of any penalty incurred under this section 
sliall be brought before a Court having jurisdiction, as aforesaid, in the place from 
which the steamboat or train emj)loyed in the unlawful excursion on which the 
action is Knuided, started, or througli, or at which it stopped in the course thereof. 

(4). " All sums of money recovered under the provisions of this section shall 
l»e appropriated as follows : One moiety thereof to the plaiiitilf, and tlie other 
moiety thereof to the municipality of the city, town, village or place from which 
tlie unlawful excursion started, to be applied for the purposes of the municipality. 

(5). 

(6). 
thereon. 

(7). " The captain or other person in charge of any steamboat and the con- 
ductor or other person in charge of any train used for the purpose of any such 
excursion shall be liable to the penalties prescribed by this Act for violations 
thereof : and the said penalties shall be recoverable aad applied in like manner as 
other penalties under this section." 

Sec. 8. — {Note. — This became law in 1897). 

(1). "No street car company or tramway company, or any electric railway 
company, except where it is necessary for the purpose of keeping the track clean 
of snow or ice, or for other acts of necessity or charity, shall run cars or trams 
upon the Lord's Day. 

(2). ' ' The foregoing sub-section shall not app'y to companies which have before 
April 1st, 1897, regularly run cars on Sunday, nor shall it confer any rights so to 
run cars on the Lord's Day not now possessed by them, nor sliull it affect or apply 
to any company which has by its charter or by any special A«t the right or 
authority to run cars on Sunday, nor shall it affect the right (if any) of the Toronto 
Railway Company to run cars on the Lord's Day, if, or when, sanctioned l)y tlie 
vote of the electors under 55 Vic. cap. 99, and 57 Vic. cap. 93. But this proviso 
sh?ll not confer upon the Toronto Railway Company any right to run cars upon 
the Lord's Day which it does not now possess (if any) if sanctioned by such vote. 
Nor shall this section apply to or affect any of the provisions of the Electric 
Railway Act, 60 Vic. cap. 14, sec. 95." 

Sec. 9. — " All sales and purchases, aud all contracts and agreements for sale or 
pui'chase of any real estate or personal property whatsoever, made by any person 
or persons on the Lord's Day, shall be utterly null and void." 

Sec. 10.— Penalty $1 to $40. 

Sec. 11. — Penalty goes one-half to informant and one-half to municipality. 

Sec. 12. — l^rovides for hearing by Justice of the Peace, and also contains 
following provisions : 

" . . ..or the said Justice on view of the offence, may verbally order, or 
if on the complaint of a third party, then may, in writing, order the offender to be 
at once committed (although it be on the Lord's Day), to the common gaol of the 



244. 

place, or Into othe safe custody, there to remain until the morrow, or Home other 
day. according to circumstances, until the case be heard and disposed of." 
R.S.O., 1887, cap. 208, sec. 11. 

Sees. 18, 14 and 15 provide for form of conviction, etc. 

Sec. 16. — Prosecution must be comintiiiced witliin one mouth. 

Sees. 17 and 18 relate to iictioiis for nets douc under tlie Stafute. 

Sec. 19. — Act not to extend to Indiuus. 

Eleciric Railway Act, R.S.O., cap. 209. 

Sec. 9. — (2) "The total acreage of lands acquired by the company for park 
purposes shall not exceed 300 acres ; and no such park or pleasure grounds sliall 
be open to the pul)lic on the Lord's Day to be used for games, picnics, concerts, 
excursions, or other public entertainments," 

Sec. 136. — (1) "It shall not be lawful for any company to which this Act 
applies to'operate its railway on tlie Lord's Day." 

(2). The rinining of cars before 10 a.m. and after 5 p.m. for the transporta- 
tion of milk exclusively, ])ennitte(l. 

Sub-Sees. 3 and 4. — For vi ilatioii company to forfeit !?400, to be recovered in 
county court and one-half to go to iilaintiil'. one-lu.lf to niunicii)ality. 

Sub-Sec. 5. — Conductor in charge to be liable to penalties under cap. 246. 



auiX 



V. i 



•■» 



QUEBEC. 

In accordance with Reglna v. Barnes, 45 U.C., Q.B., 276, English law would 
appear to be in force. 

See Imperial Act 14, George 3, cap. 83, sec, 11. (Consolidated Statutes Canada, 
page 13.) 

Revised Statutes, Vol. 2, page 111, "Sale of goods on Sunday." (General 
heading is " Good order in and near places of public worship and sale of goods on 
Sunday.") 

Sec. 3498. — "Except the sale at church doors of country parishes on Sundays 
of the effects arising from public gatherings for the benetit of Churches, or those 
destined for pious purposes, no shop-ke(^per, pedlar, hawker, or other person shall 
sell or retail any goods, wares, or mercliandise during Sunday, under a penalty 
not exceeding $20 for the first offence, and not less than $20 or more than $40 for 
every subsequent oftence." 

Sees. 3499 to 3501 provide as to penalties similar to those in Ontario. 



II 


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NOVA SCOTIA. 

Revised Statutes, Srd series, cap. 159. General he-^ding is "Of the Criminal 
Law and the administration of criminal justice." 

" Of the oflfences against Religion." 

Sec. 2. — " Any person who shall be convicted before a .Justice of the Peace of 
shooting, gambling, or sporting, of frequenting tippling houses or of servile labor 
(works of necessity and mercy excepted) on the Lord's Day, shall for every ofl'ence 
forfeit not less than $1 nor more than $8, and in default of payment shall be 
committed to jail for a term not less than twelve hours nor more than four days." 



24.-) 

iitatiitr 1889, cap. 57, extends cap. 169 to corporation*. 

Statute 18U1, cup. 5«.— Set-. 1. "Ciip 159 of H.S, of N.S., Hitl Sorien, Is hereby 
aiiii-ii*li (I Uy a<kliii<; tlioreto the I'ollowi:!;: M'ctioiis : " 

Sec. 7. — "Any parson who amploya or hires or prouurea auy uihcr person to 
jxrform servile labor (works of neceHHity and marcy azoepted) on Sunday, or who 
(lirects, allows, permits or procures any one or mora of his servants, workmen oi 
fiiiployees to perform servile labor (works of necessity and mercy excepted) on 
Sunday, is guilty of performing servile labor on Sunday within tha meaning of tha 
Bpoond section of this Act, and shall for the tirst offence, 'jtc." 

Sec. 8. — "Any body corporate which employs or hires or procuras any paraon 
to perform servile labor (works of necessity Mxd mercy excepted) on Sunday, or 
which directs, permits, allows or procures any one or mora of its servants, 
workmen, or employees to perform servile labor (works of necessity and mercy 
excepte.d) on Sunday, is guilty of performing servile labor on Sunday within tha 
meaning of the second section of this Act, and shall for the first otfeuce, etc." 



NEW BRUNSWICK. 



Consolidated Statutes, page 1082. General heading is " Criminal Law." 

'* Of offences against Religion." 

Sefc. 2. — " Whoever shall openly desecrate the Lord's Day, commonly called 
Sunday, by shooting, gaming, sporting, playing, hunting, drinking or frequenting 
tipj)ling iiouses, or by servile labor (works of mercy or necessity excepted), shall 
for every oflence pay a tine not exceeding forty shillings, or be committed to jail 
for a term not exceeding four days." 



Statute 1899, cap. 11.- 
Day." 



-"An Act to prevent the profanation of the Lord's 



Sec. 1. — (1). "No person shall on the Lord's Day, commonly called Sunday, 
sell or publicly shew forth or expose or otfer for sale or for purchase any goods, 
chattels, or other i)ersoual property or other real estate wliutsoever, or do or 
exercise any worldly labor, business, or work of his ordinary calling (conveying 
travellers or Her ^Majesty's mail by land or by watc, selling drugs and medicines, 
and other works of necessity and charity only, excepted)." 

(2). " The word 'person' in this Act shall not he construed as including cor- 
porations except where tiie context requires a contrary interpretation ; and anjrj 
corporation which requires or permits its employees to carry on the business of 
such corporation, or to labor or .work therefor, contrary to the provisions of this 
Act, shall for each oflence forfeit a sum not exceeding $100." 

(3). "Nothing herein contained shall prevent the delivery of milk or ice to 
customers on Sunday ; or shall prevent telephone or telegraph companies from 
keeping open their offices for the purposes of receiving, transmitting, and de- 
livering messages ; or the keepers of livery stables and cabs from letting on 
Sunday horses and vehicles with or without a driver for purposes other than that 
of doing business or work ; or the proprietors of daily morning newspapers or 
theii employees from doing such kinds of work as may be necessary for the 
purposes of preparing and printing a Monday morning's edition of such news- 
paper ; or any clergyman or physician from exercising the work of his ordinary 
calling on Sunday ; or any paid organist from playing in any church or in connec- 
tion with any religions service, or any paid singer from singing in any church or 
in connection with any religious service ; or any sexton from performing the ordinary 
work in connection with any church ; or the putting forth to sea of any vessel for 
any destination without the limits of the Province ; or to prevent any vessel from 



246 

• 

coming into port, or any pilot or pilot-liout or any tiiK l)oat from going in Ht'tirrli of 
vessels making tor port, or fVom bringing any vi-^tsf! into port or from talking Iut 
out of nort on i$nn<iay ; or hIuiII prcvt-nt t lie carrying on in any mill or nuiniiruc- 
tory, of any nninnt'actiiring |)r(K:fHu of hik'Ii a ;)aturo that it i8 onsoutial to itnucnl 
with the work and dovcliipniont tlieri'of contiDUounly for a period ov(M' hIx <luys lo 
prevent injury or damage to tliu material ho in course of manufacture', or tin; 
operation in any mine of any pumps ; or from steam driving ; or from towiii;,', 
booming or freighting any lumber or raft of luml>er or timber when the siiint- is in 
transit, and it is easential to proceed witli the transport of the same to |)n'v*iit 
injury thereto, or to prevent such delay in getting the same to its place of (l<stiiia. 
tion as would be liable to lead to the loss or injury of HU(!h lumlwr ; or ahull n|)|ily 
to the loiiding or unloading of ((Hhing KniackM or l)oats ; or to the moving of throiiKli 
freight trains in the Provin<;e of New Brunsiwick." 

Sub-8ec. 4 permits sailing of steamships under contract with Canadian Gov- 
ernment. 

Sees. 2 to 6 pratically identical witli sees. 2, 3, 5, 7, 10 of Ontario Act. Pol- 
itical meetings are not i>roliibited and limit of fine is $20. 

Sec. 7. — "Nothing herein contained shall relieve omi)loyees or servants wlm 
violate the provisions of this Act from the penalty thereby imposed in case of sutii 
violation." 

Sec. 8. — Section of Consolidated Statutes above set out shall remain in force. 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 



Statute 1780, cap. S. (Revised Statutes, Vol. 1, page 34.) 
due observance of the Lord's Day." 



"An Act for the 



" VVhereiia the due ol»sorvanee of the Lortl's Day in this island has been hitherto 
much neglected, and many abuwes of the sanv l«"ve been coniniitted, to the mani- 
fest prejudice and disliuuor of religion ami the shameful violation of public 
decorum and good order. 

Sec. 1. — " 13e it therefore enacted by the Governor, Council and Assembly, in 
order that all persons may be restrained from such indecent and irregular conduct 
in future, and may l)c permitted to apply themselves to the rational duties of 
relijiion and true piety, botli iniblidy and privately, no tradesman, store-keeper, 
or liny other person or persons whatsoever, siiall hereafter open or cause to be 
opened his, her or their shop or storehouse, either by himself or herself or by his 
or her servant or servants, child or children, sell, expose or ofler to sale, upon any 
bulk, stall or shed, or send or carry out any manner of goods or merchandise on 
the Ijord's Day or any part thereof. Provided, nevertlieless, that this Act shall 
not extend to prohibit any persons Jrorn selling or exposing to sale, milk and fresh 
fish before the hour of nine o'clock in the morning and after five o'clock in the 
afternoon of the said day. 

Sec. 2. — " And be it further enacted by the atithority of the aforesaid, that no 
trucknuui, driver of carls, laborer, or other person whatsoever, shall hereafter do 
or perform any labor, work, or business appertaining to his or their respective 
ordinary callings or professions or other worldly labor, or sutler the same to be 
done by his, her or their child or children, servant or servants, either by land or 
by water (works of necessity and charity only excepted), or practise or suflfer to be 
practised any sport, fowling, fishing, game, play or pastime whatsoever, in any of 
the county towns or other parts or places wheresoever within this island on the 
Lord's Day or any part thereof, upon pain that every per.son so oU'ending, upon 
conviction thereof by the oath of one creditable witness, before any of his magis- 



.Jul- 



247 

tmtefl, JuBtireR of the Peace in this island, or upon view of Buch JuHtico, shall for 
♦■vt'ry Hiuih otl'cnce forfeit, eU'." 

Statute 1801, cap. 7, aec. 10 (Vol. 2, page 420) proliil>it8 setting, etc., of nets. 

Statute 1808, cap. H, repeals exception us tu fish in StaMite 1780, above. 



MANITOBA. 

Revised Statutea, page Ig^O. — Municipal Act, sec. 604 empowers council of city, 
town, etc., to pass by-laws for "preventing perHons carrying on tlicir ordinary 
tniilcs, caliingH, or occupations on Sunday, and tlio violation of the Sabbath I)ay." 

Statute 1895, cap. SS, see. 11. 

" No car operated l)y horses or by electricity or other motive power as a Htreet 
cir or tram car shall be run or operated on the day Icnown oh Sinnlay or the 
l.did'H Day under a penalty of $100 and costs of prosecution for eacli oflence. 
Siicii penalty may Ix; r«!e()v«"red from the person, company, partnersiiip or corpor- 
ation owning an»l operating tlie cars whicli are rini or operated in eontraventicm of 
tills section, and also severnlly from each otHcer, s(;rvant or agent of the naid 
luTson, j)artnersliip, or company, or corporation, who is in any way engaged in 
tlac work of running or operating such cars in contravention of this section." 

Statute 1S!)8, cap. 27. — "An Act to provide for the better observance of th« 
Lord's Day." 

Sec. 2. — "It is not lawful for any merchant, tradesman, artificer, mechanic, 
workman, laborer, or other such person, on the Lord's Day or the day commonly 
ciillcd Sunday, to sell or publicly shew forth, or expose or ofler for sale or to 
purchase any goods, chattels, or other personal property or any real estat.: wiiat- 
«)(i'ver, or to do or exercise any worldly labor, business, or work of his ordinary 
calling (conveying of travellers or Her Majesty's mail ' v land or by water, selling 
drugs and medicines, and other works of necessity and of charity only excepted)." 

Sec. 8 prohibits games to which admittanco fe« is charged or for price or 
reward, and races for prize or reward. 

Sec. 4 proliibits advertising public amusements and opening any building for 
purpose of public amusements when admittance fee Is charged. 

See. 5. — Sale of real estate void. 

Sec. 0-11. — Penalties similar to those In Ontario Act. 

Sec. 12 repeals above provisions of Municipal Act. 

Seo. 14. — Act not to be held to repeal any laws in feroe. 



NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES. 



Consolidated Ordinances, cap. 91. — "An ordinance to prevent the profanation 
of the Lord's Day." 

Sec. 1. "No merchant, tradesman, artificer, mechanic, workman, laborer, or 
other person wbatsover, shall on the Lord's Day sell or pubHcly shew forth or 
expose or oti'er for sale or purchase, any goods, chattels or other personal proper^, 
or any real estate whatsoever, or to do or exercise any worldly labor, business, or 
trade of his ordinary calling, (travelling or conveying travellers or Her Mityesty's 



248 



¥,. ^v- 



Vnn. 



mall, selling drugs and medicines, and other works of necessity and works of 
charity only, excepted)." 

Sec. 2 forbids games, races, etc., in public places. 

Sec. 8. — Contracts made on Sunday to be void. 

Sec. 4. — Fine may be $100. 



Ili 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Revised Statutes, page 2011, applies only to old Province of British Columbia 
—enacts that following English Statutes shall be in force : 

1. Chas, 1 cap. 1 — see under Ontario. 

8. Chas. 1 cap. 1 — see under Ontario. 

■ 29. Chas. 2 cap. 1 — see under Ontario. 

11 and 12 Vic. cap. 49 (Ale House Act.) 

See also R.S., page 1304 (liquor — Sunday closing — exception as to "bona tide 
travellers.") 

NEWFOUNDLAND. 




The English law is in force by Statute of Newfoundland. 

Statute 189S, cap. 2S. "An Act to prevent the killing of seals on Sundays." 

"Be it enacted by the Governor, the Legislative Council and the House of 
Assembly in legislative session convened as follows : 

Sec. 1. — " No seals shall be killed by the crew of any steamer or sailing vessel 
or of any number thereof on any Sunday (that is to say from twelve o'clock on 
Saturday night until 12 o'clock on Sunday night) in any year, nor shall seals so 
killed be brought into any port in this colony or its dependencies in any year, 
under a penalty of $2,000 to be recovered in a summary manner by any person wlio 
shall sue for the sum before a Stipendiary Magistrate from the master or such of 
the crew of the said steamer or sailing vessel who have violated the provisions of 
the Act." 

Statute 1896 — St. John's Street Railway, sec. 33 — provides for operation 
"Sunday's excepted." 

English Statutes are in force in Regina v. Barnes is good law- -English 
Crimintd Law introduced by Statute. 

Ill, — Present Condition of Legislation. 

In 1897, at the instigation of the Ontario Lord's Day Alliance, the Govern- 
ment of Ontario introduced an act to amend the Lord's Day Act, making (1) cor- 
{>orations. (2) all classes of persons subject to its restrictions and penalties. A very 
arge delegation of various companies brought strong opposition and the Goa xM-n- 
ment withdrew the bill, giving pledge, however, that soon one of similar import 
W'culd be introduced. 

^ Since that time the Metropolitan Railway Company, despite the Act of 1897, 
forbidding Sunday privileges to ail street or electric railways not previously 



249 



works or 



possessing the same, began ruuuing their railway. They quoted in justification 
thf niliug of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia in the case of the Halifax Electric 
Tnimway Company in which it was decided that legislation dealing with such 
matters was ultra virea of the Province and belonged properly to the Dominion 
Pailiameut under "Criminal Law." 

This was a new situation altogether, and at the request of the Alliance the 
Attorney -General determined to submit a test caee to the Court of Appeal to settle 
the matter of Provincial jurisdiction, and also various other questions in dispute. 
The Attorney-General appointed, at the expense of the Government, John A. 
Patterson, M.A., Chairman of the Legal Con:mittee of the Lord's Day Alliance, 
aud Mr. A. E. O'Meara, B.A., Solicitor of the Alliance, to argue the case. The 
argument is now going forward. The following is a copy of "An Order-in- 
Couucil iu the Court of Appeal for Ontario signed by His Honor, Lieutenant- 
Governor, the nineteenth day of May, A.D., 1899 : 

"Whereas, in the case of Regina v. Halifax Electric Tramway Company, 
the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia recently held legislation regarding the Lord's 
Day passed by the Legislature of that Province since Confederation to be ultra 
vires, aud in the recent case of Regina v. Metropolitan Railway Company before the 
Court of General Sessions of the Peace for the County of York, the authority of 
the Legislature of Ontario to enact such legislation was called in question, and it is 
deemed desirable to ascertain whether and to what extent the Legislature of 
Ontario has jurisdiction on this subject. 

" And whereas, should it be held that the Legislature of Ontario has not such 
jurisdiction, it appears that, under section 129 of the British North American Act, 
the Consolidated Statutes of Upper Canada, chapter 104, still remains in force in 
Ontario : 

' ' And whereas, in various proceedings in the courts of this Province, from 
time to time the questions hereinafter set out, numbered from 3 to 7, have been 
raised regarding the true interpretation and effect of language used alike in 
section 1 of said Consolidated Statute and in section 1 of chapter 246 of the 
Revised Statutes of Ontario, 1897, and it is deemed desirable to ascertain the true 
meaning and eflect of section 1 of said Revised Statute, which ever may now be 
the law of this Province : 

"The following questions are pursuant to chapter 84 of the Revised Statutes 
of Ontario, 1897, submitted for the opinion of the Court of Appeal : 

1. "Had the Legislature of Ontario jurisdiction to enact chapter 246 of the 
Revised Statute of Ontario, 1897, entitled ' An Act to prevent the profanation of 
the Lord's Day,' and iu particular, sections 1, 7 and 8 thereof? 

2. (a) " Had or has the Legislature of Ontario power by the aforesaid Act, or 
any Act of a similar character, to prohibit the doing or exercising of any worldly 
labor, business or work o\\ tlie Lord's Day within the Province upon and in 
connection with the operation of lines of steam or other ships, railways canals, 
telegraphs and other works and undertakings to which the exclusive legislative 
authority of the Parliament of Ciinada extends under the British North American 
Act, section 91, sub-section 29, and section 92, sub-section 10, a, b, c? 

(6) " Had or has the Legislature of Ontario power to prohibit the doing or 
exercising of any worldly labor, business or work oi the Lord's Day within the 
Province when such prohibition would effect any matter to which the exclusive 
legislative authority of the Parliament of Canada extends, under any other sub- 
section of said section 91, as for example sub-sections 5, 10 and 13 ? 

3. "In section 1 of said Statute, R.S.O., chapter 246, or the Consolidated 
Statute of Upper Canada, chapter 104, as the case may be, do the words ' other 
person whatsoever ' include all classes of persons other than those enumerated 
who may do any act prohibited by said section, or is the meaning of these words 
limited so as to apply only to persons e^uadem generis with the classes enumerated ? 

4. "Subject to the exceptions herein expressed, does such section 1 prohibit 



250 







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indivirluals who for and on behalf of corporations do the labor and work . 
exercise the business of carrying passengers for hire from doing such labor and 
work and exercising such business on the Lerd's Day whether the corporations, 
for or on behalf of which the labor or work is done, are or are not within the 
prohibition of the said section ? 

5. "Do the words "conveying travellers," as used in said section 1, apply 
exclusively to the carrying to or towards their destination of poidous who are in 
the course of a journey at the commencement of the Lord's Day? 

6. " Does the said section 1 apply to and include corporations? 

7. (a) " Do the words ' work of necessity,' as used in section 1, apply bo as to 
include the doing of that which is necessary for the care or preservation of pro- 
perty so as to prevent irreparable damage other than mere loss of time for the 
period during which the prohibition extends ? 

(b) " If so, is the necessity contemplated by the statute only that which arises 
from the exigency of particular and occasional ciicumstances, or may such 
necessity grow out of and be incident to a particular manufacture, trade or 
calling? 

(c) "If such necessity may grow out of or be lucident to a particular manu- 
facture, trade or calling, do the words 'work of necessity,' apply exclusively to 
the doing on the Lord's Day of that without which the particular manufacture, 
trade or calling cannot successfully be carried on during the remaining six days of 
the week?" 



EXPLANATORY REMARKS. 



^ 






The case of Begina v. Halifax Electric Tramway Company was decided in 
January, 1898, ac'. arose from an attempt to enforce legislation of 1889 and 1891, 
bringing corporations and other employers of labor within the provisions and 
penalties of the Lord's Day legislation in force at Confederation, The main 
ground of the judgment is that such legislation belongs to the Dominion Parlia- 
ment under ''Criminal Law." 

The case of Regina v. Metropolitan Railway Company was a proceeding by 
inditemenfc to eo^brce against this company the legislation of 1897 prohib- 
iting Sunday operation by electric railway companies, etc. It may be of 
interest to note that the Metropolitan Railway Company has on two occasions, 
viz., when incorporated in 1877 and again in 1895, asked the legislature for power 
to carry passengers on the Lord's Day, and has on both occasions been refused. 
This Company is now one of the prime movers in attacking Provincial legislation. 

Sec. 129, B.N. A. Act enacts in .substance that the laws in force in the 
Provinces at Confederation shall continue in force thereafter, until repealed or 
amended by the Dominion Parliament or Ontario Legislature, according to their 
respective powers. This section is of great importance if it rfhould be held that 
the Provinces have not jurisdiction, for in most of its leading provisions the 
present Lord's Day Act is the same as that passed in 1845, which was in force at 
Confederation. 

Be Q JESTIONS ABOVE. 

1. Section 1 is that which contains the main body of the law. Sections 7 and 
8 are particularly mentioned because they were enacted by the Provincial Legis- 
lature in the yeurs 1885 and 1897 respectively. 

This question raises the broad general issue of the jurisdiction of the Pro- 
vinces. The B.N. A. Act assigns "Criminal Law" to the Dominion, and "Civil 
Rights" to the Provinces. The main question to be considered is under which of 
these such legislation falls. The answer mainly depends upon what is considered 
the real body of the legislation. If it be to stamp as irreligious or immoral certain 



251 



nets of individuals done on the Lord's Day, and therefore to make them offences, 
there is no doubt great force in the contention that the legislation belongs to the 
Biibjcct mutter " Criminal Law." If, on the other hand, the true object be, as we 
biliwVG it is, to preserve for all people the right to enjoy th« Lord's Day 
as a day of rest, and opportunity for worship, and if the legislature seeks to 
accomplish this result by regulating the exercise of "Civil Rights" in carrying on 
business or doing work, the legislation would seem clearly to fall within "Civil 
Rij,'lits." 

It is important to note that this discussion involves a question fundamental to 
the \v lole subject and a judgment holding that Lord's Day legislation comes 
within "Civil Rights" will have a valuable indiiect effect in strengthening the 
position of those who seek to uphold such legislation. 

2. These various matters, no doubt, belont;- to the Dominion as subjects for 
legislation, but it by no means follows that i^r^rsons engaged in these various 
classos of business and work are therefore for all puri)ost's made subject to the 
oxchisive legislative authority of parliament. The iraporta'it question yet remains 
wlutlier in spite of railways, etc., being as such made subject to parliiinuMit, tlioso 
eiiiiiigod upon them are not at the same time subject to the law of the Province 
which regulates the carrying on of all business and all work so as to preveut it on 
the Lord's Day. 

As to ships the question is a practical one at present. The Alliance has just a 
few days ago had representations made from Fort William as to 150 to 200 men 
being obliged to labor there last season on the Lord's Day in loading and unloading 
vessels. 

Until recent years in all these matters the law of the Province has to a 
very great extent been complied with, but recently there has been a great devel- 
opment in Sunday labor in all these. 

As to (!anals, in 1883 an attempt was made to enforce the law of the Province, 
and one, Berriman, a lock tender on the Welland Canal, was lined. Tiie convic- 
tion was afterwards quashed by the High Court on the ground that the defendant 
was a servant of the Crown. We dispute the soundness of this decision, and 
propose to contend that the Provincial Act does apply to those laboring on the 
canals. 

In (6) the matters referred to are postal service, navigation and shipping, 
international and interprovincial ferries. 

3. This is one of the most vicious principles ever applied to the interpreta- 
tion of the Act. It seems quite clear that part of the very genius of the Act 
ought to be its impartial application to the w'hole community. There is not i. 
particle of doubt that the words were originally intended to be general. Under 
this rule many classes are exempt. For example, the cab driver, musician and 
street car company. In the Hamilton case, Judge Osier based his judgment upon 
ejusidem generis, .Tudge INIacleMnan based liis judgment upon the point that corpor 
ations as such are not allected by the Act. Jliief Justice linrton took both 
grounds. By this rule the .\ct is practically limited to the classes enumerated, 
although theoretically, others may be brought in as being ejusdem generis. Some 
of the highest courts in England have in recent years taken a view upon the 
ejusdem generis principle entirely different from that adopted by our Co.urt of 
A])peal. There ia therefore good ground for hoping that ultimately the words of 
the Act will be interpreted in accordance with the real intention of the Act. 

4. In the Hamilton case two judges expressed the view that as the penally 
sections of the Act cannot be made applicable to corporations, therefore corpora- 
tions are not within the prohibition of section 1. In case this view should ultim- 
ately prevail, it is intended by this question to ascertain whether those employed 
by the corporation would be within section 1. In the Midland elevator case the 
Queen's Bench Divisional Court held that as a railway company is not within the 
Act (i.e., on the Hamilton case) the servant of the railway company is not within 
the Act. With due respect to that Court, it does not seem to us that there is any 



252 



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reasonable ground for taking this position. It is perfectly consistent with what is 
said in the Hamilton case, that an individual should be within the Act, provided 
the business or work done by him is included. 

5. This question suggests a definition of the words "conveying travellers." 
which we think to be the only sound one. In the Hamilton case Judge Rose was 
of the opinion that the i)cr.son carried a few hundred yards on the street is a 
"traveller." An important fact, however, is that in the Court of Appeal tlip 
present Chief Justice, who then presided, expressed a .strong opinion in favor oC 
the contention of the Alliance, although in that case in was not necessary for him 
to express any opinion on the point. 

6. It does not seem necessary to add to what is said above. 

7. This question speaks pi-etty well for itself. It is an attempt to settle tlie 
principles upon which the words "work of necessity" are to l»e interpreted in 
their api)lijcation, more especially to one matter, viz., manufacturing industries. 

If the one word " 'iccessfully" were .struck out from (c) it would seiMii 
reasonable to answer all thret- points of the question in the aHirmative. It would 
probably serve no useful purpose to attenijit in a short memoranthim to discuss tiie 
very complicated matters which it will be necessary to consiiler inider this 
question. One point, however, is reasonably clear, and that is, that however 
these questions may be answered there will still remain in the case of each manu- 
facturing industry the particular question of fact whether certain work is or is not 
" of necessity." 

The word "successfully" is not in the draft of questions prepared by the 
Alliance, but was inserted by the Attorney-General. The great ditliculty about 
this word seems to be that it needs itself to be defined. 

Your Committee has no recommendation to offer. That belongs more fittingly 
to the Committee on Church Life and Work. 

We desire to thank very heartly Mr. A. E. O'Meara for his " Memorandum of 
the Statutes of the Various Provinces," as well as for facts about the "Present 
Condition of Legislation." We note with pleasure the forward step whicli tlie 
Dominion Lord's Day Alliance has taken in appointing the Rev. J. G. Shearer 
Field Secretary, and we hereby pledge him our hearty support. 

Believing that a day of weekly rest and the opportunity for public worship 
safeguarded by legislative enactment is a possession of priceless value to the sons 
of toil and to all others, especially in this busy age, we earnestly ask all members 
of our Church to heartily support all efforts at safeguarding its sanctity and 
preserving it for the future free from the inroads of unnecessary labor, pleasure- 
■eeking and gain. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

D. R. DRUMMO^■D, Couvemr. 



253 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SABBATH SCHOOLS, 

1899-1900. 



To the Venerable the General Assembly : 

The report uow placed in your hands contains much that is exceedingly 
encouraging. There are features of it, however, which demand very serious 
thought from our whole Church. 

1. The increase in the number of Schools and of scholars reported is grati- 
fying. The question might be asked, however, is this increase due to increased 
activity in Sabbath School work or is it due to more accurate reports than in the 
preceding years? It is also necessary to note that even yet, if we compare the 
report with the lacts contained in Mr. Peck's appended statement, there are many 
of our Presbyterian children who are not in our Schools. Where are they? Many 
no doubt are being taught at home,, but very many are to be found either in the 
schools of other denominations, and are in danger of being lost to the Presbyterian 
Church, or are receiving no religious instruction at all, and are in danger of being 
lost altogether to the Church of Christ. 

This is the Hrst year we have a column which contains reports regarding the 
Home Dei)artment. The meagreness of these reports shows that this very im- 
portant branch has not yet taken firm hold of our Church. It is hoped that it 
may be rapidly extended in our congregations, as it not only makes provision for 
those who are not able to attend the Sabbath School, but it is calculated to unite 
more closely the Sabbath School and the home in the religious training of the 
young. 

2. The Training in the Schools. — It will be noticed that there is a dec"ded 
increase in the number of those committing Scripture to memory, also the Shorter 
Catechism. It is generally felt, however, that there is serious defect in the sys- 
tematic study of the Bible, and that ignorance of its simplest truths is sadly 
prevalent. This is perhaps partly due to the fragmentary nature of the lessons in 
the past. There is an improvement in this respect and we hope for better things 
in the future. Our best and most faithful teachers say it is due very largely to the 
fact that no systematic etlbrt is being nuide to train the teachers to teach : that 
witli only about half an hour each week at theii disposal tliey cannot hope to 
accomplish much, unless they are familiar with the best methods of imparting 
instruction. They are pleading earnestly for the establishment of classes where 
they can receive the instruction which tliey so nuich need. Can something not be 
(lone to render more efficient the labours of the devoted men and women who are 
teaching in our Schools? 

A discouraging feature of this '•eport is the decrease in the number of those 
who are coming into full comnuniion with the Churcih from the Sabbath School. 
Since 1896 the number has each year been decreasing. Why is it? Are the claims 
of Christ and His Church urged upon the young as they shonld be? Surely all our 
labour is in vain if it does not result in the surrender of these young lives to Him 
who died for them and lives fcv them. No forward movement which claims our 
advocacy is to be compared in importance with that which will secure the leading 
of the children to Christ and building them up in Christ. 

3. Loyalty to the Missionary Work of Our Church. — The reports show that a 
considerable sura has this year been raised for missionary objects in advance of last 



254 



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year. With the exception of cboiit $2,000 this increase is tl»e outcome oi' tlio 
Children's Day coUection for the Century Fund. It is j^ratiiyiug to notice tliat tlic 
collection on Children's J)ay did not in the least interfere with the sum raised lur 
Schemes of the Ciiurch. It has been, no doubt, a stimulus to uiu" people in tluir 
giving to the Century Fund that tbe children, who with the ministers took the 
lead, resi)onded so nobly. It is sitcserely hoped that next Children's Day will 
indicate tiiat the interest the young have taken in this forward movement of llic 
Church has deepened and widened. A comparison with other Ciuirches in Canada 
and the I'liited States will show that much yet renuiins to be done in the direction 
of educating the young to give. In the United States in some of the Churchis 
they have the Sabbath School organized as a missi<»nary association and give the 
children systematic instruction in the Sfcliemes of the Church. No doubt that is 
done with us to a certain extent, but not by any means as thoroughly as it should. 
If we had more deiinite instruction with regard to the work our Clnnv^h is doiiiu 
in the iiome and thi^ foreign field, not only would v/o have larger contributions now, 
but the young would be led to see that tliere is no mission work more important 
than that in whicii our Church is engaged, there is none more wisely or economi- 
cally administered, and there is none the results of which are more satisfactory. 
We need to sound in our Sabbath Schools the note of loyalty to our Church in lur 
missionary work. 

There are other features of the work in the Schools which already exist, to 
which, did space permit, it would be well to call attention. Tliere' is one subject 
whicl) has occupied the thought of your Committee which must not be overlooked, 
namely ,Sa/>6<»//( School Extension. In the older -jarts of our coiuitry there are many 
large congregations where the people drive four and live miles to church. 'I'lic 
children find it impossible to attend the central school. In many cases they are to 
be found in the schools of other denominations in the neighbourhood, and in not a 
few instances they afterwards leave the church of their fathers and become faithful 
members of the church which in their childhood made provision for their spiritual 
instruction. In many of these large congregations branch schools have been 
organized. This has, however, not been done as universally as could be desired. 
If we are to hold the young for our own Church, there must be a forward move- 
ment in this direction. Then, in the newer parts of our country which are beini; 
opened up and rapidly settled, there are many districts where it will be impossible 
for some time to establish i-egular Sabbath services. In every one of these 
districts the Sabbath School could be made a powerful agency in keeping the 
people in touch with the Church and with spiritual things. There is not a 
locality, it matters not how sparsely settled, where there could not be found 
godly men and women who would undertake this work, if schools were 
organized and if they felt they had the .sympathy, prayers and co-operation of the 
whole Church. Sabbath School extension in the newer parts of our couutry is an 
absolute necessity if we are to hold our Dominion for Christ. 

The question might be asked, what is your Committee doing to help forward 
the work in our Scliools? The reports appended show what has been done during 
the past year. The Statistical Report reflects credit on Mr. Peck, the statistical 
secretary, and also on the ditlereut Synod and Presbytery conveners. The 
accurate and full returns are the result of most pefseveriug etlbrt on the part of 
all. Your Committee, by correspondence with all the Presbytery and Synod 
conveners, endeavoured to .secure Presbyterial visitation of the Schools. The statis- 
tical returns show that we have only been jtartially successful, but where it has 
been accomplished the most gratifying results have followed. The visiting has 
not been inquisitorial in its nature, but has been such as to encourage and stimu- 
late. It is hope 1 thai during this ye;u' many more Schools will be reached in the 
older parts of the country. In the more siiarsely settled districts it seems impos- 
sible, owing to the great distances, to accomplish much by this instrumentality. 
It is strongly I'elt that something more thorough and systematic in the w-ay of 
ov'ersight .;hould be attempted than has hitherto prevailed. In other churches 
agents have been appointed who have devoted their whole time to the oversight 
of schools already in existence, and to the organizing of new schools. The results 



255 

have been such as to justify the appuiDtmeut. This method of overtaking the 
work in our Church was suggested and so forcibly advocated in your Committee 
tliat it was unanimously resol"?d that all the facts regarding the condition of our 
Schools should be laid before this Assembly. In accordance with that resolution 
tlie paper prepared by Mr. Peck has been appended to this report and the 
Assembly is respectfully asked to consider it. Your Committee does not suggest 
what should be done, but it is felt that our Church only needs to know the facts in 
order that she may be roused to action. 

A forward movement in Sabbath School Avork is needed. When Sabbath 
Schools were first organized they were intended for neglected children. 
They have become an integral part of the Church, and we have now 
rea(!hed a point where, if we do not make our schools elHcient, the future oj" our 
Church will be seriously affected. It is true that, after all, the success of the 
Sabbath School work jjrimarily depends on the minister, superintendents and 
teachers in the individual Schools, with the active co-operation of the parents in 
the home. No man or number of men or committee can make the work successful, 
if there is not fidelity there. Yet it is felt that some supreme effort ought to be 
made to so reach every School that every Sabbath School worker and every 
scholar in the remotest parts of our country would feel the warm heart of our 
Cliurch beating in sympathy with the work in which they are engaged. 



STATISTICS. 

Rev. W. W. Peck, Secretary of Statistics. 

In presenting their report to Assembly on Sabbath School Statistics your Committee 
would ask attention to the very marked increase reported in nearly all departments of 
the work. It is evident that in a number of our Synods and Presbyteries, Conveners 
and their Committees have done faitlif ul service during' 1899. For a summary statement 
of Sabbath School Statistics your attention is directed to the table that is appended. 
The foUowiui^ analysis will explain, however, some features of the report. 

SCHOOLS. 

For 1899 we report 2,(598 ordinary schools — an increase of 2fiO— and 120 Home 
Department Schools, a total increase of 380 scliools. The increase of 200 ordinary 
schools is distributed as follows : 

Synod of Maritime Provinces .30 

Montreal and Ottawa ;]6 

Tor .ito and Kingston 57 

Hamilton and London 54 

Manitoba and North- West 56 • 

British Columbia 27 

Of the 2,098 schools 135 are not reported in the returns for 1899. Repeated eftbrts 
to secure reports have brought no response from them. The 1.35 schools are distributed 
as follows : — 

Synod of Maritime Provinces 39 

" Montreal and Ottawa 41 

" Toronto and Kingston 28 

" Hamilton and London 5 

" Manitoba and North-West . .' 17 

" British Columbia 5 

• 
It is but fair to add that in the Western Synods the small number of non-reportiug 
schools does not indicate that all schools have reported. It rather indicates that, on 
account of distances, etc., there area number of schools still unknown to Conveners. 



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266 

OKKICKRS, TEACHERS ANI» HCHOt.ARS, 

In 1899 in tho 2,503 ordinnry schools that have r ported we Imd 21,010 oHicerH ami 
teachers — a j?ain of 2,025— ind 177,098 scholars— a gain of 17,548. Counting the ."{."N- 
roported in Home Department Hchools we have in the reported schools 202,490 in fit 
tendance--an increase of 23,355. This increase, due largely to better returns, is (lis 
tributed a. follows : — 

Synod Maritime Provinces 3,070 

" Mcmtreal and Ottawa 2,2(M» 

" Toronto and Kingston 9,431 

" Hamilton and London 3,303 

" Manitoba !:ad North-West 4,0()5 

" Britiah Columbia 1,340 

SCHOOLS OLOSKl) DUHINO PAKT OK THE YEAR. 

Of the schools reporting 1,047 are open all the year and 91(5 are closed during i)art nf 
the year. The schools closed during a part of the year are mainly in the cities and ()ii 
mission helds. 

COM.MITTING HCRIPTUKE. 

One thousand nine hundred and four schools report 78,740 children — a gain of 
27,333 — committing scripture to memory. Six hundred and tifty-nine schools make no 
report and the conclusion is that in these schools no attention is paid to this matter. 

COMMITTINii SHORTER CATECHISM. 

One thousand seven hundred and seven schools report 07,981 scholars committing 
the Catechism to memory. This is a gain of 0,(i30, though 85(5 schools — one third of all 
reporting — make no mention of scholars committing the Catechism to memory. 

GRADING OF SCHOOLS. 

Nine hundred and thirty-six schools report that they are graded by age, andr491 
report that they are graded by recitation, or by age and recitation. The remaining 1,13(J 
schools did not seem to know whether they were graded or not. At least three of our 
Synod Conveners claim that the reports show that there are very few schools "graded" 
in the pedagogic sense of the term. 

NUMBER OK NEW COMMUNICANTS. 

Of our 2,503 schools, 937 report 3,777 scholars becoming members in full communion 
during 1899. Seemingly from 1,020 of our schools there were none that could be 
reported. 

Special attention is drawn to the reports of the last four years. ^ 

In 1890 with a total attendance of 108,225 we reported 4,728 new communicants. 
In 1897 " " 17:^,118 ' 4,027 " 

In 1898 " " 179,141 ' 3,847 " 

In 1899 " " 202,490 ' 3,777 " 

Our attendance has been constantly increasing and the number entering into full 
communion has been constantly decreasing. In 1890 of every 10, 1 in attendance 281 
became members in full communion during the year. In 1899 of e. . 10,000 in attend- 
ance 180 becune members in full communion during the year. 

teachers' meetings. 

♦ 
Of the 2,503 schools 288 regularly hold \ichers' meetings for the study of the lesson, 
and for consultation as to how Sabbath School work may be done more efficiently. 
Seemingly the remaining 2,275 schools are satisfied with present riiethods and results. 



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257 



SKSSIOX A I, VIJSITATION. 

Lust yetir the A98eml)ly recommended "to nil Syiiodsand PreHhyterie8 the personal 
(tviTsij^ht of their schools l)y personttl visitHtion while in session." In Hccordance with the 
(vhove, schools were iisked to report as to whether or not they had l»een visited (a) l»y a 
rejiresentative of the Session (l>) by a representative of Presbytery's Sabbath School 
t'oimnittee. 

Of the 2,5G;5 schools reporting,' 257, or about ten per cent. , report that they have been 
visited during the year l)y a representative of the Session. The Rules and Forms of 
I'rocedure adopted by the General Assembly of 1H8!> states that "the duty of the Session 
is to watch over and promote in every scriptural way the spiritual interests of the con- 
i;re!,'ation, to care for the religious instruction of the young, including the oversight of 
Sfibl)ath Schools, etc." ' ■ 

I'KKSHYTKKIAI, VISITATION. 

In thirty-one of our Presbyteries no visitation of Sabl)ath Schools by a represent- 
ative of the Presbytery's Committee was attempted. In all 199 schools in twenty-one 
Presbyteries were visited. The Montreal Presbytery reports that eighty-four of its 
schools were visited. The Ottawa Presbytery reports that forty-four of its schools 
were visited. Nineteen other Presbyteries report seventy-one achoojp visited — an aver- 
age of about four for each Presbytery. There is reason for thinking that the four 
schools in each Presbytery were either on the tield occupied by the I'resbytery's Con- 
vener or on a field occupied by some member of his Committee. 

CONTRIBL'TIONS. 

In 18*J9 for the support of Sabbath Schools, congregations contributed .^11, 10.'^ and 
the Sabbath Schools themselves contributed 854,7<J2. This was a decrease on the part 
of the congregations of §2,055 and on the nart of the Sabbath Schools of $."},775. It 
would seem to indicate that our schools are not only becoming se''-8upporting but also 
are spending less on themselves. 

In 1809 $28,071- an increase of $4,070— was contributed by 1,101 schools to the 
Schemes of the Church. It would seem thai 1,402 of our Sabbath Schools gave nothing 
to the Schemes of our Church. 

Witli regard to contributions for all other purposes $18,1^04 was contributed. This 
is an increase of $8,498 and ilii:j increase is largely due to the fact that amounts contri- 
buted by Sabbath Schools to the Century Fund have been placed in this column. * 

For all purposes our 2,503 schools contributed $101,137 during 189!). 

I.— litp]Rat(;re. 



SABISATH SCHOOL LIBUARIES. 

Your Committee realizing the importance of securing as far as possible suitable 
books for our Sabbath School libraries, appointed a Sub-Committee to compile a list of 
books which could be safely recommended to our schools. That Committee has not yet 
finished its work, but it is hoped that before next meeting of Assembly such a list will 
be published. 

SABB'iTH SCHOOL HKLl'S, KTC. 

At botli the September and April meetings of your Committee resolutions were 
passed strongly recommending our own Sabbath School publications. In recommending 
these it was felt that we were not only loyal to our Church but also to our country, as 
these publications are not only satisfactory in theii relivious teaching but they are also 
thorliughly Canadian in sentiment. We hope soon to see them introduced into all our 
scnools. 

children's day. 

A Sub-Committee consisting of Revs. John Neil, T. F. Fotheringham, R. D. Fraser, 
and J. C. Tibb, are at work preparing the programme for Children's Day. It is hoped 
that this year we may be able to secure that Children's Day, as appointed by the General 
Assembly, may be observed in all our schools. 

9 



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258 



H.-inaHEH RELTGTOUS INSTRUCTION. 

In view of the action of kst Cienoral Assembly, your Committee decided to drop tliu 
Hchoine of Higher lleligious Instruction. Before, however, it was po8sil)le to take action, 
it was found that a large number of scholars had entered on the quarterly examinations 
of last year and were committing the Shorter Catechism to memory with a view tn 
securing Diphmias. Feeling contident that it would be the wish of the Ansemhly tlmt 
faith should bo kept with those who had entered on the work, all who had begun were 
permitted to complete the examinations. The correspondence in connection with tliig 
proved to the Committee that there is a very strong and widespread desire that some- 
thing should be done by the Church to encourage the memorizing of Scripture and the 
Shortor Catechism. Hence the recommendation which will be brought before the 
Assembly with regard to Diplomas. 

III.— FINANCES. 

It is gratifying to be able to report that the contributions received in response to 
the appeal made in connection with Children's Day amounted to 810,844.05. De- 
ducting the amount for printing and other accounts, $(>75.08, there remains a balance 
of $10,108.07, which, with interest §55.79, has been transferred to the Century Fund. 

Since the closing of the books on March .'Ust, accounts amounting to $!)5.4ti have 
been paid. These were part of the unpaid liability reported to the last Assembly. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

The following recommendations are suggested for adoption by the General 
Assemlily : 

1. That Synods and Presbyteries exercise care in the selection of Sabbath 
School (conveners, and that, for greater etlectiveness in the work, these be not too 
frequently changed. 

2. That all Sabbath Schools be visited while in session by representatives of 
Session, and also, where possible, of Presbytery ; such visitation not to be inquisi- 
torial, but for the encouragement of the teachers, officers, and scholars, and the 
improvement of methods of work. 

3.' That a Home Department be established in connection with each school, as 
tending to develop family reMgion ; to increase interest in and attendance at tlu 
Sabbath School and public worship ; and, through companionship of young and 
old in study, to stimulate to more systematic and thorough searching of the 
Scriptures. 

4. That pastors and SabbUth School superintendents be urged to encourage the 
memorizing of Scripture and of the Shorter Catechism by the young ; and that as 
a stimulus to this : — (1) A diploma from the General Assembly be given to any 
pupil of a Sabbath School who is certified by the superintendent or minister iu 
charge, to have accurately repeated the whole of the Shorter Catechism at one 
continuous sitting ; and (2) A similar diploma be given to any pupil who is certi- 
fied by the superintendent or minister in (charge, to have accurately repeated 
Scrii)ture memory vei'ses, to be specially selected, to the lumiber of two hundred, 
or thereabout, at one continuous sitting ; candidates to be eligible for both 
diplomas. 

5. That the General Assembly heartily commend for use in Sabbath Schools 
and families the series of Lesson Helps and illustrated papers now provided by the 
Committee on Sabbath School rnblications, as furnishing excellent assistance iu 
the study of the Scriptures, and as calculated also to interest the young in their 
own Church and its enterpises, and to foster an intelligent Christian patriotism. 

G. That parents and teachers be exhorted to more earnest and p' .lyerful effort 
to bring the young, through the influence of the Holy Spirit, to a saving know- 
ledge of the truth and to a recognition of the claims upon them of Christ and His 
Church. 



269 



'\ drop the 

» view to 
3Jlll)ly t),,jt 

egun Wore 
with this 

H'ld the 
f'>''e the 



7. That, in view of the fact, as made cvidt'iit in the Kojiort, tliat there !• still 
rciDiu for a wider extension of Sahhatl' ■*cliool worl\, and as a lirst step towan Init 
cimI, it bean instruction to Sessions an<l Presbyteries to endeavour to organize such 
Imuieli schools or new schools us there may be need for, especially in missionary 
districts. 

8 That the General Assembly express satisfaction with the general and liberal 
response of the Sabbath Schools oi. Children's Day to the claims of tli° Century 
Fund, and this without dimiinition of, l)ut rather increase in, their ordinai,> contri- 
butions, and urge upon the schools, in the disposition of their moneys, to give jtrior 
claim to the Schemes of their own Church. 



All of which is respectfully submitted. 



JOHN NEIL, 

CoHvener. 



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APPENDIX 11. 

SYNODICAL SABBATH SCHOOL MISSIONARIES. 

The followitisj is -in abatr-tct Ukeii fro:u the "Minutes of Proceedings" ni the 
September meeting (1891)) of the rjenenil Assembly's Sabbath School Committee : 

"The Rev. \V. W. Peck gave notice of motion that, in view of the reports received 
from the Synodical and Presbytery Conveners, he would move at the next regular meet- 
ing of this Committee, that this Sabbath School Committee recommend to the General 
Assembly, the appointment of Synodical Sabbath School Missionaries, the salaries and 
the expenses of uaid missionaries to be paid out of " Children's Day Collection." 

I wish to bring before you, as a member of this Assembly's S. S. Committee, sdnie 
facts as to the present condition of our work. I wish to point out what other branclu-s of 
the Church are doing, and try to show that, whether the above motion is or is not carried, 
the present condition of our work calls for some decided action on the part of the 
Committee. 

I. THE CONDITIONS CALLING FOR 1>KCIDED ACTION. 

By resolution of the last General .Vssembly the Synod Conveners wert 3commended 
to consult together in regard to "enrollment," "conduct" and "contributions' of 
schools within their respective bounds. Their attention was drawn by letter to tlie 
following position and, they were asked to report to the September meeting of the 
Committee : 

First, — According' to the ref)ort presented to the last Assembly, our " enrollment' 
is far behind what it might be. One half of our young people of " scho(.)l age " are not 
reached at all. 

Second, — Under the head of "conduct" it appears that only about one-third 
memorize Scripture or Catechism, a large propor.ion of schools close part of the year, 
remarkably few "teachers' " meetings are held and a very small number of scholars are 
joining the Church. 

Third, — Under the head of "contributions" about $L*5,(XJ0 of the collections have 
been given to the Schemes of our Church and §10,000 to other objects." 

The letter continues, "These defects are not now and you may have been trying to 
overcome them, therefore your experience and that of your committee will be valuable ; 
what would you suggest to be done ! " 

The following are extracts taken from the answers of the Synodical Conveners :— 

1. Maritime Provincen. — Recommends formation of Synodical S.S. Associations and 
that each presbytery hold a meeting once a year for discussion of doctrinal and practical 
topics in the best interests of Sabbath School work. He adds, "Undoubtedly sutiiciLiit 
attention has not been given to our Sabbath School work in the past. " 

2. Montreal (Did Otlaiva. — Recommends systematic visitation of all schools and that 
Teachers' conventions and institutes be held by all Presbyteries, and adds: "So many 
things need to be done that one is apt to be disheartened. Our enrollment is defective. 
Our school rooms and their appliances, such as heating, blinds, seats, maps, black- 
boards, reading matter, etc., etc., need consideration. We need to emphasize Teacner 
Training, Home Department, Cradle Roll, Supplemental Lesso .. , Collections for 
Schemes. * * * It does seem that the desire for Sabbath School workers, or 
agents, or missionaries, expressed in some districts, deserves very careful consideration. 

3. Toronto and KiH(iston. — The Convener suggests the emphasizing of systematic visi- 
tation of all schools. Presbytery Ctmventions, Home Department Work and Grading of 
Schools, and adds "The consideration of the whole field and its present condition leads 
to the conclusion that Sabbath School missionaries to oversee the work are needed in 
each Synod." 

4. Manitoba and North-West, — The Convener refers to the great distances of the 
West and points out that visitation of schools is desirable but almost impossible by busy 
pastors. He writes : " The question of Presbyterial visitation is deemed quite out of 
the line of what is practical, except in connection with general exchanges these ministers 
may make. Others have not time, nor generally the means, required for direct Sabbatli 



School visit! 
each other,! 
tribute, 
on what is < 

,-). Bri\ 
families, tli 
after six ml 
aries spokel 
district is fl 

In thel 

September! 
ami \Vork,l 
thou and al 
There is aJ 
services in 
This is th 
cheering." 
As sec 
prepare fi 
Sabbath S 
"Tht 
number of 

1. Hf 

Canada ? 

Accoi 

These ret 

Presbyter 

i:U,0i»2, 

The Domi 

between t 

Presbyter 

In 1H'.>8, 

.■j,r)00,000 

Schools. 

2. V 

ance in t 
Acci 
national 
Scotia, ^ 
171 rept 
denomii 
V),U8 
in the 1 

:5. 

other d 

Sir 

1.488, ( 

inc(mie 

auce at 

Tl- 

factorj 

vcsulte 

own m 

and pf 

Depar 

metho 

"The 

T 

our C 



*i%^i^*^' 



263 



School visitation. The cost of .acquaintance with our church courts, to say nothing of 
ench other, puts both missionaries and their lielpers in all work under considerable 
tribute. * * * It is very true that much now depends, in our settling communities, 
on what is done with our children and young people." 

5. Britiult Columbia. — The Convener writes: "Last year, to reach the scattered 
families, the Home Department was tried at fifty places where no schools existed, but 
after six months we had to give it up for lack of money to buy supplies. The mission- 
aries spoke in gratifying terms of the benefit." * * * The real need of this whole 
district is a Sabbath School missionary to visit all our schools and neglected districts and 
supervise the work. But for lack of money we would have had one before now." 

In the "Pastoral Address" of Rev. Dr. Campbell, Moderator of Assembly, issued 
.September, 1899, there is the following : " Other messages come to us through the Life 
and Work, the Sabbath School and the Young Peoples' Societies' Reports." " Come 
thou and all thy house into the ark " is the first special word which is set before us here. 
There is apathy. There is indifference. There is a falling off in attendance at Sabbath 
services in some quarters. Our ranks are not being filled as we might reasonably expect. 
This is the undertone which runs through reports that have much in them that is 
cheering." 

As secretary of the Committee on Statistics I was asked by Rev. R. D. Fraser to 
pre()ar3 for the Teachers' Monthly, (February, 1900), an article on " Attendance at 
Sabbath Schools." The following is an extract : 

"The teachers and the Church will sutt'er four plain questions in reference to the 
number of scholars enrolled in our Sabbath Schools. 

1. Has the attendance kept pace with the increased Presbyterian population of 
Canada ? 

According to the last census returns (1890) the population of Canada was 4,83.S,2.'i9. 
Tliese returns also estal)lished that out of every 10,000 people in Canada, l.oO.S were 
Presbyterians. In 1890, then, there were 755,320 Presbyterians in Canada, and of these 
l.")4,0!(2, or less than eighteen per cent., were reported as attending our Sabbath Schools. 
Tlie Dominion Statistician points out that four-tenths of the Canadian population are 
between the ages of five years and twenty years ; if so, then in 1890 there were 302,130 
Presbyterian children, taking tbut term as indicating those between the ages mentioned. 
In 1898, though, it is estimated that the population has increased from 4,833,2.39 to 
.5,000,000, we reported to the General Assembly but 160,150 children in our Sabbath 
Seliools. 

2. Has the attendance in our Sabbath Schools kept pace with the increased attend- 
ance in Canadian Sabbath Schools as a whole '. 

According to accurate reports made by Provincial Associations to the Ninth Inter- 
national Convention, held at Atlanta, Georgia, in April last, in the Provinces of Nova 
Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Quebec and Ontario, 113 counties out of 
171 reported 002,312 children in attendance at Sabbath Schools organized by various 
denominations. Taking the census of 1890 again as a l)asis, of these 002,312 children, 
1'), 148 ought to be Presbyterians, and perhaps were, but instead of reporting 1(50,148 
in the 113 counties, we reported to the last Assembly 140,012 in the 171 counties. 

.3. Has the advance in C-bbatli School attendance ke[)t pace with the advance in 
other departments of our Church s work ? 

Since the Union of 1875, the number of our ministers has increased from 64() to 
1,488, or 1.30 per cent., our membership from 88,228 to 212,020, or 140 per cent., our 
income for all purposes, from 8982, ()72 to ^2,511, 175, or 155 per cent. ; but the attend- 
ance at Sabbath Schools only increased from 79,204 to 100,150 or 104 per cent. 

The reports received from conveners for 1899 continue to emphasize the unsatis- 
factory condition of our work. While better methods of collecting statistics have 
resulted in more schools reporting, still in nearly all the cities we are not holdinu our 
own numerically, and there seems t<i be the same ajjathy as before on the part of sessions 
and parents. In many places, judging from the answers received, the nature of Home 
Department work is unknown. There are very few Teachers' meetings to discuss 
methods or improvements. As the Convener of the Synod of Montreal and Ottawa writes, 
"The returns show that our Schools simply do not know what it is to be graded." 

The .Montreal Presbytery is perhaps the best organized on Sabbath School work in 
our Church, yet this month (March, 1900) a committee, after visiting eighty-four schools 



M 



t ^ If • -I 




^' 




b 



'^' 



264 

during the year, reported: "Our present position, at least in the city, 'S grave, and 
something has to be done. In the country there are schools closed that ought to ije re- 
opened, and there are schools closed in winter with no good reason."' 

A Presbytery Convener from the Maritime Provinces writes: "Influences in our 
Presbytery have been directed in the past towards inter-denominational work to such an 
extent that the time and strength of our church have been largely diverted from objects 
which really demand our entire energy. I believe our chief need just now in the 
Maritime Provinces is a travelling secretary who could get in touch with all the ministers 
and win them to ardent work among the young. That seems to me to be the remedy for 
a good many deficiencies. I believe the Church mast move in that direction, and look- 
ing to the future I believe she should move that way now. That is practically the only 
means of putting a spirit of enthusiasm in the weaker Sabbath Schools and congreLja- 
tions." 

Hamilton and London. — "There is no doubt that our Sabbath School work 
recjuires the immediate attention of the Church. It is undoubtedly suffering from lack 
of oversight, of method, of aggressiveness, as well as from too narrow an aim and range 
of view. What is needed is something to rouse not only the Church to see the need of 
the Sabbath School for her own sake ; but to rouse schools to understand their strength, 
the place they might take and the purpose which they might serve ; to help to unify the 
forces which nre at present being largely dissipated through side channels or into thin 
air ; to create a common interest and enthusiasm which mig'it i.uike it easier to introduce 
truer methods of study and a higher standard of teaching. Synodical missionaries 
would seem to me, persona'ly, the best way to accomplish this end, though if nothing 
else could be obtained, a Superintendent of Sabbath Schools would doubtless be of great 
service in pulling the work together and giving it the added power and efhciency which 
comes from order and oversight." 

WHAT IS BEING DONE IN OTHER BRANCHES OF THE CHURCH. 

1. Ill Canada. The two strongest Protestant churches in Canada are the Methodist 
and the Presbyterian. Attention is drawn to the following features of Sabbath School 
work in the Methodist church in Canada : , 

In 1875 a fund known as "The Sunday School Aid Fund" was established for "the 
purpose of assisting poor schools in remote and destitute neighbourhoods and to secure 
papers and periodicals with which to carry on their work. The principle of self help is 
adopted to as great an extent as possible and schools receiving aid are expected to con- 
tribute one half of the amount of the grant. In this way the schools assisted have 
contributed during the past four years the sum of $10,055.66." The following extract 
is from the report of 1892 : 

" I know of no fund of so small an amount which is doing so large an amount of good 
as the Sunday School Aid and Extension Fund. Its income is about $5,000, yet l)y its 
aid during the year ninety-four new schools have been established, and about 240 more, 
in remote and destitute places, have been assisted with books and papers. In many 
places instead of having the surfeit of books and papers which many possess, these 
Sunday School papers are almost the only reading of any sort that they get. By means 
of this Society, schools have been planted, out of which, in many cases churches have 
grown, among the fishing villages along the stormy coasts of Newfoundland and Nova 
Scotia, in the lumbering settlements of New Brunswick and the Upper Ottawa, among 
the scattered farmsteads and ranches of Manitoba and the vast North-west Territories, and 
among the mining camps of British Columbia. I get many letters which touch my eyes 
to thankfulness and tears, exprespiag the good which is being accomplished by means of 
these papers, from such romot j ano ' mely places as Topsail Harbour, Nipper's Cove, 
Seldom-Come-by Inlet, in New' jundiand, and from Red Bay, Labrador, to the Upper 
Skeena and Naas River on the borders of Alaska. By these means many devoted Sun- 
day School workers are aided and cheered, who, in isolation and loneliness, far from the 
knowledge of the praise of men, but not unnoticed by the eye of God, are seeking to lay 
broad and sure and stable the foundations of the commonweal in righteousness and truth 
and the love and fear of God — the great principles which are the corner-stone of our 
national greatness and which are the pledge of the stability of our institutions." 

Now that our "Publications Debt" is paid, why cannot "Children's Day" collection 
be at letst partly devoted to helping weak schools and starting others where none exist ? 
Sabbath School missionaries under direction of Synod or Presbytery Committees could 
visit outlying fields and make a report on which action could be tdl'en. 



Ag»i"i| 
Schools an<j 
work is spt 
The fob 
;j,,l,oiutmeJ 
' "Onel 
,iuadrennii[ 
l,ers as cor 
there were 
7.1 Til meml 
interest inl 
others wh{ 
The f| 
is'.i8, and] 
tendeuce 

In U 
scholars, 
schools, 2 
IOC, 0(17. 
were Met 

2. NV 

For 

tlie churc 

The folio 

Minneap 

Duri 

Synods, 

aries hav 

force of t 

SynodicH 

also the 

Pres\)yt< 

liounds I 

without 

Th< 

r, ard i 

nussion 

of earn 

Chvistii 

01 iviima 

experit 

wisdon 

Tl 

where 

literat 

evang 

laboui 

emph 

I'resl 

in a ' 

will 8 

uatui 

undf 

cimif 

enie 

prill 

so fi 
ivel 
nioE 
inal 
and 
bee 



265 



fit to ije re- 
cces ill our 

to such an 
lorn oltjects 
low in the 
ministers 
Remedy f,,,- 

and U,„\(. 
ly the only 

coiigreua- 

ool ivorlv 
from iHck 
*iid range 
3 need of 
strength, 
unify the 
into thin 
introduce 

ssionaries 

f nothing 

3 of great 

icy which 



'lethodist 
h School 

for "the 
to secure 
If help is 
' to Con- 
ed have 
; extract 

: of good 
by its 

[) more, 

n many 

, these 
means 

'S have 

I Xova 

anioui^ 

3s, and 

Y eyes 

ans (if 

Cove, 

"jiper 
(Sun- 
Hi the 

;o ]ay 

truth 

four 

ction 
xist ? 
ouhl 



Again, in 1805, the Rev. A. C. Crews was appointed General Secretary of Sundry 
Schools and Epworth Leagues, and his work in organizing and directing Sabbath School 
\v(irk is spoken of in the highest terms l)y the last General Conference. 

The following item regarding the growth of "The Home Department" since the 
ii[ppointment of some (jne to devote his whole time to Saljbath School work is interesting. 

" One of the most gratifying features of our Sabbath School work during the past 
([Uadrennium has been the growth ot the Home Department, which now has 7,151 nn^m- 
Ijers *s compared with none in 18'.)4. In 1895 there were 1,850 members. In 1890 
there were jX'tl!) meml^ers. In 1897 there were 5,4.% members. In 1898 there were 
7, l.")l members. In 1899 there were 10,204 members. This department is intended to 
interest in the study of the Sabbath School lessons, parents, invalids, travellers and 
others who from various causes are unable to attend the regular ses.sions of the School." 

The following comparison of statistics, taken from Minutes of General Conference, 
ls!)8, and Assembly Report, 1899, is also interesting, as showing what careful superin- 
tendence can accomplish : 

In Methodist Church in Canada — schools, .S..'?22 ; officers and teat hers, .'32,87.'^; 
scholars, 207,509 ; average attendance, 100,007. In Presbyterian Church in Canada — 
schools, 2,.'370 ; officers and teachers, 28,827 ; scholars, 157,490 ; average attendance, 
10(;,007. (In 1890, according to Census returns, of every 10,000 people in Canada, 1,754 
were Methodists and 1,503 were Presbyterians). 

2. What is being done by the Presbyterian Church in the United States ? 

For years the Church has been supporting Sabbath School Missionaries. Last year 
the churches Contributed $31,939, and the Sabbath Schools on Children's Day, 852,000. 
Tiie following extracts are taken from the report presented to the General Asseml)ly at 
Minneapolis, May, 1899 : 

During the past year the work of this Board has been conducted in twenty-three 
Synods, covering portions of twenty-nine States and Territories. The Board's Mission- 
aries have laboured within the bounds of sixty-seven Presbyteries. The total missionary 
force of the Board in the field on April Ist, 1899, was seventy-nine. Of these twelve are 
Synodical Sabbath School missionaries labouring within the bounds of Synods, and having 
also the oversight of the work carried on by Presbyterial .nissifmaries. The number of 
Presbyterial Sabbath School missicmaries is sixty-seven, all of them labouring within the 
l)ound8 of particular Presbyteries. No missionary under any circumstances is appointed 
without the consent, as the case may be, either of Synod or Presbytery. 

The Committee would here call attention to the exacting care exercised by the 
B ard in the selecticm and appointment of its missionaries. Fully one-half of the Board's 
missionaries are regularly ordained ministers of the Church ; the other half is cf>mi»osed 
of earnest, consecrated laymen, who have given evidence not only of irrej)roachable 
Christian character, but of the possession of such intellectual gifts and attainments as to 
command the respect of those among whom they are called to labour. All are men of 
experience in Christian work, and the results of their labour in general fully justify the 
wisdom of their appointment. 

The work of the.se Saljbath School missionaries consists in the organization, and, 
where necessary, the re-organization of Sabbath Schools, the distribution of Christian 
literature ; house to-house visitation • formation of Home Departments ; holding of 
evangelistic services ; opening of preaching stations, and other varieties of evangelistic 
labour incidental to the main purpose of organizing Sabl)ath Schools. This fact deserves 
emphasis : These missionaries of our Board of Publication and Sal)bath School Work are 
Presbyterian missionaries, dointc a distinctively Presl)yterian work ; they are not engaged 
in a nondescript evangelization. They are engaged in the work of planting .seed that 
will spring up into Presbyterian schools and Presbyterian churches. From the very 
nature of the case, it sometimes hapjiens that the school organized must be of a union or 
undenominational character. This, though not the best, may be the best under the cir- 
cumstances. But only where a distinctively Presbyterian school is impossible is a union 
enierprise encouraged. It is better than nothing. But the Board proceeds on the 
jirinciple, and the Conmiittee is confident that the Assembly will approve the policy, that 
so far as is practicable, Presbyterian money should be spent for the spread of a distinc 
ively Presbyterian Gospel. This policy is in no wise inconsistent with the truest and 
most generous catholicity. There is neither virtue nor sense in any form of interdenom- 
inatiim which ignores or belittles denominational conviction and denominational loyalty 
and self-respect. Union schools and union churches may sometimes be necessary, 
because of certain peculiar circumstances, but not infrcijuently has it been found that 




1 r**! 



.;>* 



8t ,| 



i:.'^' 



.266 

their tendency is to produce a type of Christianity sadly lacking in vigorous and aggres- 
sive activity, and cliaracterizod mainly by intellectual inanity and pious sentitnentitlisni 
and insipidity. 

During the past year the missionaries of the Board organized 848 Sabbath Schools, 
and re-organized 319 more, with u total enrollment of 42,079 scholars and teachers. 
They distributed 5,873 copies of the Word of God and 14,433 other volumes of Christian 
literature. They also distributed 5,699,781 pages of Lesson Helps, tracts and periodicMJs 
published by our Board. In their house-to-house visitation in localities destitute of the 
regular ordinances of the Gospel, they found entrance into 74,828 homes, and in eacii 
of these they left some seed which, by God's grace, may spring up to the glory of His 
name. They delivered 12,049 public addresses, travelled 015,273 miles, and report 1,88- 
conversions. As illustrating the practical efficiency of the work of our Sabbath Schoo 
missionaries the fact may be cited that in this State of Minnesota alone, out of the l,.5(J0l 
schools organized by the missionaries of the Board during the past eleven years, 140 have 
grown into churches, 108 of wliich are Presbyterian, with an approximate membership 
of 3,000. About sixty of these Presbyterian congregations have erected houses of wor- 
ship with an estimated value of $140,000, a sum vastly in excess of all that the Board 
has expended upon the work in this State. 

The report of 1896 says : "Since we began this work eight years ago, there have 
been 1,539 new Presbyterian churches organized, including those reported from Foreign 
Mission Fields. Of this total 418, or twenty-six per cent., have grown out of our Sab- 
bath School missionary work. Brethren, this tree is a fruit bearer." 

The report of 1900 says : *' We have positive information of the existence at the 
present time of 3,790 Sabbath Schools organized by the missionaries of this Board and of 
459 Presbyterian churches which have been developed from these churches. A lari,'e 
number of churches of other denominations have also grown out of schools o-'janized l)y 
our missionaries." 

HOW COULD WE MKET THE EXPENSE ? 

In 1898 the Children's Day Collections were devoted to the payment of the balance of 
the Publications debt. In many places the response was slight, yet §4, 194.37 was raised. 
In 1899 the Children's Day Collections were devoted to the Century Fund, and 810,000 
was asked to be raised du"ing the year. From July 1st to March 1st — eight months— 
$10,242.01 was raised. See March Record, page 93. Those who ought to know claim 
that if a forward movement of Sabbath School work were rightly presented to our 
schools there would be a far greater response. 

These facts and figures are presented to you to remind you of the present condition 
of our Sabbath School work and to point out that my motion does not ask for some 
uncertain and untried thing. To ask pastors or laymen already burdened with work to 
undertake this additional Sabbath School work is manifestly a mistake. We need care- 
fully selected men to devote their whole time and energy to this work — men who will 
organize and lead forward the forces that now exist and are but waiting for leadership. 

Hoping with you, that some action may at once be taken to appoint some person or 
persons to devote their whole time and energy to this work of placing our schools, in 
membership and in effective work, in that position their importance demands. 

W. W. PECK. 



267 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON YOUNG PEOPLES' 

SOCIETIES, 1899 3 900. 



fo th'' Venerable fhe Oenend AssevJilij: 

The Young Peoples' Societies reporting to your Committee may be classified as 
follows : 

1. Young Peoples' Societies of Christian Emleiivour 75)0 

2. Junior Societies of C.E 45 

'A. Young Peoples' Associations (iO 

4. Young Peoples' Home Miosionary Societies 2."} 

5. Boys' Urigades 8 

0. Guilds :i 

7. Mission Bands and Children's Hour 5 

8. Missionary Associations .'i 

STATISTICli. 

Total membership reported HI, 185 

Active members in C.E. Societies 18,2."{4 

Associate and other members in C.E. Societies 10,364 

Young men who are members of Senior Societies !),140 

Young women who are members of Senior Societies 16,7!*5 

Boys in Junior Societies 1,75.S 

Girls in Junior Societies 2,084 

Number of members in full conununion. . l(i,t)81 

Total amount contributed for Schemes of Church §!12,9.'}2 

Total amount contributed for all purposes ^^0,424 

1 >etailed statistics will be f(jund at the close of this Report. 

The Committee in looking over the various Reports are chieHy impressed with their 
incompleteness. 

Notwithstanding constant reminders many societies fail to report. One Presby- 
tiuy's Convener says : " This year forty-five blanks were sent out to the different churches 
Hiid mission stations, and l)Ut fourteen were returned with the desired information." 
Tlicn, many reports that come in are so carelessly prepared, so contradictory on the face 
of them, as to be of little value. This may be said also of some Presbytery Reports. 
A different method of computing meml)ers makes a seeming lose of ;S00 members in one 
I'lesljytery where there has been an actual increase in active and associate memljers. 
ISomotimes total mimbership is reported with no division into active and associate 
inoiiil)ers ; frecjuently there is no report of the number of members who are young men 
Kiul young women, or who are church members. 

Little reliance, theref(jre, can be placed on the statistics given, and they afford 
a jjoor basis of comparison from year to year. 

DECREASE IN MEMBERSHIP AND INTEREST. 

Though there is a slight increase in the immber of societies reported as known, it is 
evident from the tone of all Presbytery Reports that the "growing time" for 
young people's societies has passed, and that in many sections of the Church there is 
serious and rapid decline. 

The Young People's Society of Christian Endeavour has taken a firm hold of the 
eastern section of the Church, and holds its own there much better than in the West. 
Halifax is the banner Presbytery with fifty-six societies of all kinds, and is closely^ 
followed by Truro with fifty-four and Prince Edward Island wita fifty-three. Truro* 
Presbytery is an illustration of what is possible in the way of organized work among 
'he young yeople. With twenty-two congregations and four mission fields, there are 
forty-eight senior societies and six junior locieties of Christian Endeavour, an average of 
two societies for each congregati<Mi and mission field in the Presbytery. One Presby- 




I> 







k-^U 



?l'f 






268 

tery in the East speaks of decrease and likens it tu ''galloping consumption," whjlo 
many Presbyteries in the centnvl and western sections of the Church speak of decline 
in membership and practical work. 

This falling off in numbers and enthusiasm is traced by some to the passing nwny nf 
the novelty connected with any new movement. They believe that the foam and frotli 
of a first enthusiasm having been scattered to the winds, the young people an; now 
settling down to quiet, unromantic, every-day work for Christ and the Church, and are 
doing better, more solid work than ever. One good feature of the present Report is, 
that with a decrease of membership there has been an increase in contributions. But 
the majority of Presbyteries feel that there is a real loss of interest, that Christ and tiie 
Church are not holding the attention of our young people, or drawing out their eflort in 
work and study as at one time we had hoped. In many congregations Christian 
Endeavour Societies are disbanding or dwindling to a vanishing point, and too often 
nothing is taking their place. One Presbytery asks, " Is the training for service and the 
awakening of interest among the young people of our congregation which has in recent 
years proved such an inspiration to all engaged in the Master's work, and which ij;ave 
such i)romi8e for the future, to be only a thing of a day ? " 

There are some who would dismiss the whole subject with a wave of the hand say- 
ing, " The Christian Endeavour movement has run its course and is exhausted." lUit 
those to whom the future of Christ's Kingdom is dearer than life, and who, tlierefure, 
can never cease to be anxious about the state of religion among the young, feel that they 
must go behind such statements and seek the causes of exhaustion. 

CAUSES OF DECLINE. 

Presbytery Reports suggest, among others, the following causes of decline in 
numbers and interest : 

" Not suiHcient practical work to enlist and keep the interest." 

' ' Desire to be entertained rather than to give thought and study to the Word of (Jod 
and etibrt to the work of Christ." 

"Too many meetings, something must be neglected." 

" Cards, dancing, dress and jewelry." 

" Blame does not lie at the door of the constitution of the Christian Endeavour 
Society, but in the heart of those whose loyalty to Christ and the Church once linwed 
forth in devoted service, but who now love too much this present world." 

/ reason given by fully one half of the Presbyteries that speak of decline is that 
sessic. .8 and older people do not take the interest they should in the young people und 
their work. 

" Is there not ground to believe that, dispite all influences to the contrary, more 
faithful eflort on our part would result in a more encouraging Report. — Presb\jii'iij nf 
Frinre Edvord IsUind. 

" The trouble is not so much due to lack of interest and loyalty upon the pvrt of 
young people as on the. part of those who have the oversight. If sessions expect youii;; 
people to he loyal to the church and its work, the young people have a right to expect 
that sessions will be loyal to their interests, and offer such guidance and help as they 
may re((uire." — Presbytery of Huron. 

" The young people are not getting all the help they reijuire. Some sessions are 
leaving the young people severely alone." — Presb[itery of Homilton. 

And many others to like effect. 

From all this it is evident that two things are essential, if the young people of our 
Church are to fulfil the promise '•' past years in Christian life and work. (1) There must 
be a turning of the hearts of the fathers to the children, and of ministers and sessions to 
their young people. (2) There must be a revival of Christian zeal and missionary sjiirit 
through the direct operation of the Holy Ghost in the hearts of those among our young 
people who already confess Christ. 

PROBLEMS. 

The fact that with less than a thousand societies reported as known to exist, about 
800 are known to be Societies of Christian Endeavour and forty-five junior Societies of 
Christian Endeavour, clearly indicates that Christian Endeavour is still the young peoples' 
society of our Church. In some Presbyteries, however, there seems to be a reaction 
against the Christian Endeavour type of meeting and the pledge ; and the ger.eral fall- 
ing off" in interest has raised the question whether 'he Christian Endeavour is any loiif^er 
the best form of society to express and develop '•■^■y Christian life of our young people ; 



'»« of tlecline 

SSillg Hway „f 

a and frotl, 
'oplo art' now- 
Tch, aiui are 
Re|iort is, 
udons. ({uj 
"8t find tht' 
leir effort in 

Christian 

id tof) often 

■^ ice and the 

as m recent 

which (fave 

le liand say- 
sted." Hut 
tlierefcire, 
el that they 



decline in 
i'ord of ( ;od 



Endeavour 
)iice flowed 

iiie is t!i;,t 
Jeojde and 

'^n> more 
?sbyti'nj ,,f 

>e part of 
3ct youni,' 
to expect 
p Hs they 

sions are 



'e of our 
ere must 
ssions to 
•ry spirit 
r young 



t, about 
ieties of 
peoples' 
'eaction 
-al fall- 
loncjer 
)eople / 



269 

DoubLless a majority of ministers and societieu still feel, as was expressed last year, 
that there is nothing yet in sight to take the place of the Y.P.S.C.E. with its strict and 
solemn pledge and pliable organiz^ttion ; but in some fifty or sixty instances there have 
been modifications. A few societies have become young peoples' associations in which 
the literary and social element predominate. (3thers have abandoned the pledge but 
remain distinctively Christian associations working upon lines very similar to those 
of the past. 

One or two have added a literary meeting to the Christian Endeavour, and a couple 
of others a normal class. Several ministers wishing to coiicentrate all strength in the 
weekly prayer-meeting, have amalgamated the Christian Endeavour with it. Mere let it 
1)6 said that in many small congregations and outatatijns the Christian Endeavour takes 
the place of a weekly prayer-meeting or of a Sunday evening service, and old and young 
are members of the society active and associate. 

In St. John Presbytery there are five societies for the study of religious knowledge, 
under the leadership of the pastor, reported to have been a great success this past year ; 
and the Presbj'tery recommends that where the usual Endeavour work seems to lose hold, 
a course of Biblical and religious teaching be, as far as possible, given to keep the 
interest up and educate the members of the societies. 

In Ottawa I'resbytery nearly one third of the societies are Young Peoples' Associa- 
tiims which have meetings alternately, devotional, literary, social. It is noticeable that the 
Christian Endeavour societies have given chiefly to the Schemes of the Church, and other 
societies chiefly to congregational objects. The Committee of that Pres'oytery go on to say 
that whatever change in constitution or methods may be necessary to meet present condi- 
tions, they "are not hopeful of the success of any young peoples' organization which exists 
chiefly for social objects, for literary pursuits as for the purpose of raising money. If 
our young people are to be held together, especially if our young men are to be enlisted, 
they must be enrolled with a motive more abs<jrbiiig than these, more virile and more 
worthy of their time and energies. The supreme aim should be to bring the young 
people of our Church to Christ, to build them up in Christ and in intelligenl ccumunion 
with the Church, to send them into the world to work for Christ and to take an active 
part in the great enterprises of cur Church at home and abroad." 

The Assembly's Connnittee fully sympathize with this conviction. Societies with 
any lower aim are not likely to be permanently successful, and they do not deserve to 
be, as they are of no permanent value to the congregation as the work of the Church. 

Some Presliyteries are asking that the Young Peoples' Societies be made of greater 
educational value, and that a more systematic study of the Scri})tures have place in the 
weekly meetings. In this connection it has been questioned whether there is any need 
of Young Peoples' Societies. Are not the Sabbath School and the Bible Class all that 
we need for the religious training of the young outside of the home ? 

An answer to this question is given in the Report made to the Kingston Presbytery. 
" The aim of the Young Peoples' Society is to train not teachers but workers, and this 
by having them take responsibility and do work. If we can help train even a few of our 
young people, who shall feel a deep sense of responsibility and learn as in a technical 
school the lesson of systematic division of labor, let us by all means have Young Peoples' 
Societies in every congregation — call them by what name we |)lease. Specific instruction 
may be given as well or better in B'ble Class and Sunday School, but without a Society 
the young people themselves are not taught the significance of church work by actually 
doing that work." 

I'RACTICAI, waiiK. 

Under this heading, a quotation from the Report to the Synod of Toronto and 
Kingston sums up all that need be said : 

" The work done by Young Peoples' Societies has been so often summarized in 
reports to Synods and General Assemblies that it seems unnecessary to traverse the same 
ground again. Although nothing specially new in the line of work has been reported, it 
is very evident that young people are hard at work, and that their energies are wisely 
directed according as the local needs and circumstances seem to demand. Many an 
invalid's time would drag more wearily, many a church would be more dreary, many a 
sailor on our great inland lakes would bo more lonely, many a lumberman would jtass 
his evenings and Sundays less profitably, many a pastor's hands would be weakened, 
many a church member would be more disheartened, many a dollar less would be found 
in the church creasuries, many a pulpit would look more bare and uninviting, many a 
stranger would be made less welcome in a congregation, many a wanderer from home 




iifir I 






• .'•?, 



r'^lll' >.* 




2T0 

would have fewer restraining^ and uplifting intluences thrown around him were it not for 
the loving ministries, the kindly thouyhtfuliiess and the consecrated enthusiasm of niem- 
mombers of Young Peoples' Societies." 

PLAN OF STl'OY. 

At the last meeting of the General Assembly the following commendation and 
suggestion was made : 

"The General Assembly would repeat the commendation given by previous 
Assemblies to the Plan of Study in its general features, and, in view of the demand fnim 
several quarters for a more systematic study of the Scriptures in the Young I'eopli-s' 
meetiii!,'H, would suggest to the Committee to consider whether this may not 
be arranged for in the Plan of Study, in addition to the ground already coverod 

The Committee, at their meeting in Septenilar, 1809, gave much consideration to tliia 
([uestion of introducing a more systematic study of the St. 'tures in the Young Peoples' 
meetings, but were convinced that the time had not yet come when any large number nf 
our societies would be willing to set aside the "Uniform Topics" suggested by the 
United Society of Christian Kndeavo ir, for some more systematic course of study. 
Accordingly the Plan of Study was tiHnued on the same general basis as befoie a 
question each week from tho Short*: '. ktechism and special monthly topics on the 
missions of our own Church, the Bible a ' he Book of Praise, as follows : 

For week beginning 

.January 21 — Century Fund Evening. 

February l.S — Korea .)ur latest Foreign Mission Field. 

March 18 — llo' ae Old Testament grow. 

April 15 — Hiyrtf the New Testament grew. 

May 'JO — Work and Workers in the Yukon »nd Northern Gold Fields, 

June 17 — How we got our English Bible. 

July 15 — The Presbyterian Cliurch throughout the World. 

August 19 — The Place of Soiig in Christian Worship. 

(The History of Sicred Song from Apostolic Days until the 

Present, suggested as a Study.) 

Our Work among the Indians in N. W. Territories and 
British Columbia. 



September 1(5 



Ootobei 



21 — The Book of Praise— The Psalter. 



-suggested as a Study ) 



(" The Psalms in History " 
November 18 — ( )ur Honan Mission. 
December l(i — The Book of Praise — Hymns 1-34. 

An article on each monthly topic appears in the preceeding month's Jtecurd. The 
Committee desire to expre,ss their thanks to the writers who in response to the ro(iuest 
of the Convener have so willingly rendered this service to the young people of 
our Church. 

The total number of societies reported as having adopted the Plan of Study in wlxdo 
or in pari, is 352, al)out one society in tliroe. Truro Presbytery reports: "Twelve out 
of forty-tive Christian Endeavour Societies tried the Plan, sonid with excellent results. 
One society re{)orts failure in its adoption and the Plan has been abandoned. An 
impression seems to be current in some quarters that the Plan is out of harmony with 
the general spirit of the Christian Endeavour movement, and for this reason certain 
.societies have refused to adopt it. Some object to it because the subjects assigned are 
too difficult." The Convener then adds, " Surely such Endeavourers cling to first prin- 
ciples and are loath to leave them and press on to higher attainments." 

Barrie is the banner Presbytery in this matter, twenty-six out of forty-five 
societies having adopted the Plan of Study. 

Owen S )und Presbytery request their Committee to recommend at the June meet- 
ing some desirable plan of consecutive Bible reading for the use of all the young people 
of the Church. 

The Report presented to the Synod of Hamilton and Loudon says : — "The bill of 
fare supplied at our Y'oung People's meetings has not sufficient nourishing food in it to 
sustain a vigorous Christian life. There is not enough meat in the soup. The subjects 
of the Topic Card of the United Society of Christian Endeavour are all interesting 
enough, but there is no logical order ; no consecutive line of study. There is no oppor- 
tunity for systematic Bible study. Passages can be read bearing on these subjects every 



Balance 
From ^ 
Commi 
Balanci 



Travel 



To be 



^ I 1 

wettk in the year, and littlo more knuwn either about the su))jecta or the Uible in the 
enil than at the beijinning. Thoughtful young people are aHking what is the proHt. 
Ami feeling they are not repaid for the hours spen^ in theHe meetings they withdraw. 
In [nirt the AsHenibly'H excellent Plan of Study meets the dilHculty, but there is urgent 
need for its extension to cover twelve months instead of twelve weeks." 

.But the fiuestion arises, if only one-third of our societies can bo induced to adopt a 
niDiithly plan of study, could we expect a large numV)er to adopt a weekly ? Perhaps if 
H >,'i>()d Bible class conducted by the minister or some competent person could be made 
an integral part of the work of the Young Peoples' Society that might prove the best 
solution of the problem. The Committee are anxious that some time might be given in 
AHseinbly to discussion of this most vital ([uestion. 

TOPIC CARDS A.M> IIOOKLKTS. 

At the request of the Committee, Rev. R. D. Fraser, editor and manager of our 
Siibba^h School publications, has pul)liahed and issued a series of Topic Cards and 
Booklets, embracing the " Uniform Topics" of the United Society of Christian Endeavour, 
and the plan of study outlined by the Committee. Up to May 4th, (•,;500 Topic Cards 
and 14,500 Booklets had been sold, a considerable decrease on the previous year. 

INSTRUCTIOX OF CHILnKEN. 

The last General Assembly again reminded ministers, .sessions and Young Peoples' 
Societies of the urgent need of providing for some systematic instruction of the children 
in the great missionary enterprises of the Church, and instructed its committee to consider 
and propose to the Church such means as may seem titted to forward these desir- 
able ends. 

The Committee after due consideration passed the following resolution : — 
" While this Committee is c